MARKETING 2016 Guest Q&A with Antonio Sciuto, Nestlé Waters

Carlton Doty

The customer journey is vital to success in the age of the customer, and as technology advances, collecting data can help personalize the experience from start to finish. At MARKETING this week, Antonio Sciuto, CMO of Nestlé Waters, will share insight into the company’s brand new ‘war room’ that displays real-time data showing customer journeys and tracking customer touchpoints.

You don’t want to miss Antonio’s talk on Tuesday afternoon. I had the chance to chat with him to get the inside scoop on how he’s leading his organization with a customer-obsessed mindset, from real-time data to customized customer journeys. Here’s what he had to say:

Q: Some may find it hard to see the applicability of customer journey analysis to a product as "simple" as bottled water. When did you first begin focusing on the customer journey? Why?

Antonio Sciuto: Digital is accelerating and changing several aspects of our lives.  In the US consumers are now spending 52% of total time on digital media channels. This is evolving the consumer journey shifting marketing focus from building databases to fostering communities. We aim to offer a seamless brand experience evolving from “simple” bottle water to healthy hydration solutions across all touch-points, online and offline.

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"Sustainability" - What Does It Mean For Your Business?

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.
Forrester is kicking off research on what it means to be a sustainable business and why it matters. In short, it matters because customers and investors care. But what do they care about? And, what does sustainability mean to them, and to the companies they do business with? 
First stop in exploring the definition of something is, of course, a search for the term. “Sustainable” means that something can go on, and continue and “be maintained at a certain rate or level.” For consumers, that might mean their health, their environment, or the health and environment of others -- but also their budgets. The literature on sustainability often refers to three pillars: social, environmental and economic. But how does this translate into business metrics?
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MARKETING 2016 Guest Q&A – The Next Wave: Age Of The Customer

Carlton Doty

You might have read my blog post last month about why you should attend this year’s MARKETING Forum in New York. The event is just around the corner, and I’m looking forward to all the sessions we have in store that will help marketers learn to deliver brand promise in every customer touchpoint.

I recently caught up with a few of our guest speakers to chat about their sessions, their brand strategies when it comes to innovation and personalization, and how leading their organizations with a customer-obsessed mindset has brought them success.

Be sure to check out The Next Wave: Age of the Customer sessions that will close out the event on Wednesday afternoon, which will feature talks from Anna Fieler, EVP of marketing at POPSUGAR Inc. and Michael Medenhall, CMO at Flex.  

I hope to see you at the Hilton Midtown next week – register here! In the meantime, here’s a sneak peek of what to expect at the Forum.

Q: Personalization is one of POPSUGAR’s core strategic pillars. Can you explain how you create personalized experiences for your customer base? Some make a distinction between "personalization" and "individualization" -- what do those terms mean to you?

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No Change, No Gain: Stop Your Siloed Approach to Digital Measurement

Cinny Little

The number of tools, technologies, and techniques for measuring digital customer experience has exploded, but many firms continue to build out their growing capabilities in separate silos, such as campaign measurement, web analytics, mobile, social listening, voice of customer, online testing.  My colleague James McCormick and I have just published a report that lays out the full range of metrics of a mature digital intelligence measurement framework (see figure below).  Take a look.  How many of these measurements do you work with today?

Your firm may have capability to produce many - or all of these metrics - but are you using them to improve customer experience and business value?  Several vendors we’ve talked to recently, who represent a cross-section of digital measurement technologies and services, described what they hear about this from prospects and clients. A (scary) summary:  the firms report that they now have boatloads of data and a growing number of digital measurement technologies, mostly in silos  – but don’t think they’re getting enough value from what they have.  It’s as if some firms are paralyzed.  This can’t continue.  Operating silos of separate digital measurement approaches is not good enough any more. You risk falling behind competitors who are successfully combiningg approaches and continuously maturing their digital intelligence. 

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What Should I Order? A Tasting Menu Of Customer Analytics Techniques

Brandon Purcell

The primary objective of customer analytics is to transform data into valuable insights that impact organizational goals.  With an abundance of organizational goals, petabytes of data at their disposal, and a whole slew of potential techniques for analyzing that data, customer insights professionals often (quite ironically) find themselves in a state of analysis paralysis.

Forrester’s updated TechRadar™: Customer Analytics Methods, Q2 2016, originally published in 2014, aims to help CI pros by highlighting 15 customer analytics techniques their peers are using to extract insights from their data.  In this edition, we have emphasized the need for customer entity resolution, a foundational precursor to many of these techniques.  We have also broadened sentiment analysis to text analytics to reflect the move toward more actionable categorization of unstructured data.  And we have updated examples of relevant technology and services vendors, the estimated cost of implementation, and our assessment of where each technique sits on the analytics adoption curve.

The techniques run from descriptive to predictive, and employ structured, unstructured, and geospatial data.  Potential use cases run the customer lifecycle gamut from acquisition to personalization to loyalty and retention.  Since customer analyses don’t exist in a vacuum, the report describes the interrelationships and dependencies between different techniques. 

CI pros who face an ever-expanding list of stakeholder requests should use read this report to help plan and prioritize customer analytics projects.

Before You Reorganize Customer Insights, Press “Pause”

Cinny Little

“Organizing is what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it is not all mixed up.”  - A.A. Milne  

There’s good food for thought in that statement.  “Organizing” is a topic that customer insights (CI) professionals and their marketing, digital, and other business partners are asking about. And one frequently asked question is “what’s the best way for us to organize?”

Why is that question so top of mind?  Consider this: Forrester research shows that despite continuing investments in people, big data, and technology, companies are not driving enough insights to actions. For example, 74% of firms say they want to be “data-driven,” yet only 29% say they’re good at connecting insights to actions.  In addition, business satisfaction with analytics went down 21% between 2014 and 2015.  These numbers show that there’s an insights-to-action disconnect, and it’s an expensive problem.

In addition to organization, CI pros also frequently mention two day-to-day pressures they experience:

  1. They can’t keep up with the volume of stakeholder requests.
  2. There’s what one CI pro described as “the black hole” between insights and actions: CI pros may never know what action, if any, resulted from insights they provided. 
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The “Quantent” Quandary

Brandon Purcell

Last week, I had the opportunity to attend a teleconference highlighting IBM Watson’s success stories over the past year.  Most of them are under NDA, so I can’t go into the details, but I will say they covered an incredibly broad range of use cases.  One use case that I was hoping they would cover and didn’t was content analytics for marketing, aka “quantent.”

In the customer analytics arena, we often talk about “getting the right message to the right customer at the right time.”  This is only partly true.  Well-built and rigorously tested propensity models will deliver you the right customer and the right time.  Behavioral segmentation models may even specify the best channel to use to deliver the message.  But that still leaves the message itself.  Whatis the right message?

Content analytics begins with entirely different data than customer analytics, and the two analytical streams merge just prior to the point of action.  Whereas customer data contains information about customer profiles, transactions, and behaviors, data about content characterizes tone, length, wording, dates, products mentioned, type of offer (if applicable), and other key themes within the content itself.  Most importantly, content that has been subject to A/B testing also creates data about the success of the message on an individual customer basis.

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Musings on Mobile World Congress 2016: IoT Generates Insights From Cows To Customers

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

More than 100,000 people descended on Barcelona, Spain last week to be part of Mobile World Congress (MWC), one of the world’s largest annual technology events. My new report, IoT And Insights Are Two Sides Of The Same Coin, recaps some of  the MWC 2016, including expectations for new 5G networks, the Internet of Things (IoT), and applications that will deliver value from the multitude of connected things — and people. A few of those highlights include:

5G Networks Promise Speed But Require Patience. 

Telecom operators and network equipment providers eagerly discussed the faster speeds and lower latency of new 5G networks.  And, fast it will be. While reports vary, network tests show download speeds peaking at more than 20 Gbps; average 5G speed is expected to be 100 times faster than current 4G networks. With that kind of speed, true video streaming becomes a reality for consumer and business uses. And, that reality can be with virtual or augmented: AR and VR were all over the exhibit hall. I successfully fought with a dragon but had to bail out of the helicopter I was flying as the experience got a little too real.

But alas, these good things only come to those who wait. The 5G standards will not be finalized before 2018; and commercial availability not before 2020 at the earliest. Large-scale network rollouts will likely take much longer. For now, we’ll all have to live with 4G reality as it is.

Interest In The Internet Of Things Is Exploding – Well Beyond Things.

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Hot Off The Press – The Forrester Wave™: Customer Analytics Solutions, Q1 2016

Brandon Purcell

We have all this valuable data about our customers, but we need to make better use of it.

This is the most common theme I hear on inquiry calls, at conferences, and in advisory sessions.  At this point, companies are fully aware that their data contains enormous value.  In fact, I like to think that data has a potential value much like the concept of potential energy in physics.  In physics, the conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy requires force.  In business, customer analytics is the Force that unlocks the hidden value in your customer data.

Because customer analytics often relies on advanced machine learning algorithms, it used to be the domain of statisticians who could write code in R or Python.  Today, thanks to the 11 customer analytics solution providers in The Forrester Wave™: Customer Analytics Solutions, Q1 2016, customer insights professionals are applying these techniques to their data to address key business objectives.  This report, which is only available to Forrester clients, evaluates the customer analytics solutions of Adobe, AgilOne, Angoss, Alteryx, FICO, IBM, Manthan, Pitney Bowes, SAP, SAS, and Teradata.

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Apple Does The Right Thing To Defend Customer Privacy

Fatemeh Khatibloo

By now, most of you have read about Apple's powerful public statement of refusal to comply with a court order compelling the firm to help the FBI gain access to the data stored in the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone 5. Specifically, the FBI requires Apple’s help disabling the device’s data auto-erase function after 10 incorrect password attempts, and Apple is refusing to modify the software to enable this.

Over the past three years, Apple has hitched its brand wagon to privacy, because the firm believes that a) customers care enough about privacy to vote with their dollars and b) as the steward of people’s most personal, sensitive data, Apple has an obligation to serve their best interests. While this isn’t the first time that Apple has found itself targeted by regulators over privacy, this is the firm’s staunchest defense yet against government intrusion. Forrester believes that, with this move:

  • Apple is putting its money where its mouth is. Until recently, there has been plenty of debate about whether Apple has simply been paying lip service to privacy. But this move — along with its recent shuttering of the iAds business — proves that Apple is making serious product and business model changes in support of user privacy. Tim Cook is holding fast on the line he drew in the sand last year at the EPIC’s (Electronic Privacy Information Center’s) Champions of Freedom event in Washington, DC, where he said:
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