Gaylord Hotels Prioritizes And Delights

Paul Hagen

I recently talked to a business analyst at Gaylord Hotels who shared how the company is changing its customer interactions using sentiment analysis derived from its Clarabridge software. Three points were particularly illustrative of a company maturing in its delivery of customer experience:

  • Success is about being great at key interactions, not every one. Originally the hotel believed that during a stay, guests experienced 100 different things — 80 that staff needed to do great and 20 that staff needed to do satisfactorily to satisfy customers. After watching sentiment data for the past couple years, the company realized that in fact only five activities most strongly correlate with guests recommending the hotel to others. For example, the first 20 minutes is absolutely essential, a period that the hotel had broken into several discreet steps but that guests viewed as a single experience. Hotel management now works with staff on executing on these five critical activities perfectly, while on the other 95, they only need to perform adequately.  
     
  • Prioritizing investments based on target customer needs saves misspent money. While some managers felt that it was necessary to renovate rooms in a wing of the hotel to transform the property and improve customer satisfaction, analysis showed that the hotel was getting no negative comments about it, particularly from its most important segment of guests. Based on the findings, the hotel decided to invest that large sum of money in other areas, such as a technology solution that helped people find their way through the hotel, which was generating more negative sentiment.
     
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Setting And Meeting Experience Expectations

Paul Hagen

One of my favorite customer experience graphics here at Forrester speaks to companies “making promises” through marketing and branding channels, while “keeping promises” by delivering value through other channels. However, there are external forces at play that raise people’s expectations. Companies like Google make us wonder why we can’t have good search when looking on a manufacturer’s site for a product; Trader Joe’s makes us wonder why floor staff at other stores isn’t as friendly and helpful; and Zappos makes us wonder why products don’t always arrive ahead of schedule.

I’ve taken liberties and updated the graphic to reflect that the “promises” companies make are really “expectations” that they set, and those are influenced by lots of external factors. In order to meet customer expectations — thus delivering a good experience — companies have to account for those factors that may lay outside of the firm or even the industry.

 

Why Does It Matter?

About 67% of companies that we surveyed describe their customer experience goal as simply trying to differentiate from competitors in their industry. But, they must also factor in the expectations set from outside of their firm or industry. Does this mean that every company needs to deliver a Zappos-like experience? Absolutely not! But it does mean that companies need to understand clearly what their customers really expect from them.

Live Streaming From Forrester Customer Experience Forum 2010 — Day Two

Harley Manning

It’s Day 2 of Forrester’s Customer Experience Forum 2010, and I'm incredibly excited to see this morning’s opening speech by our own James McQuivey. He's going to demo Microsoft’s new interface that uses gestures and natural language commands with help from the company that built it, PrimeSense. You may have heard of this as Project Natal or Kinect — but hearing about it does not do the trick. You have to see it and then hear James’ take on what it means for e-tailers, financial planners, media companies . . . wow. Forgive me if I seem a little blown away, but I’ve been watching the rehearsals, and all I can say is that I have to have one of these! Check back throughout the day for more about this speech and others.

Today's Live Stream

8:30-8:35 a.m.
Day 2 Opening Remarks
Harley Manning
, Vice President, Research Director, Forrester

8:35-8:45 a.m.
What Our Ethnographic Research Tells Us About . . . You!

Victoria Bough
, Vice President, Practice Leader — Customer Experience & Customer Intelligence, Forrester

8:45-9:30 a.m.
How Radical New Interfaces Will Transform Consumer Product Experiences

James McQuivey, Ph.D.
, Vice President, Principal Analyst, Forrester

Sponsored by RightNow

Live Streaming From Forrester Customer Experience Forum 2010 — Day One

Harley Manning

Welcome to all of you at Forrester’s second annual Customer Experience Forum in New York City! And to all of you who can’t be here — we’ll miss you. Sales for the event were so far beyond our goals and expectations that we are flat out amazed. There are about 900 people here from many industries, especially financial services. Attendees come from many professional roles: We’re seeing a good mix of people who work in marketing, eBusiness, customer intelligence, and customer experience (of course), including a strong contingent of senior managers and executives. So please keep checking in here for the latest updates and discussions around our theme of customer experience breakthroughs!

Today's Live Stream

8:30-8:50 a.m.
Welcome And Setting The Stage 
Harley Manning
, Vice President, Research Director, Forrester

8:50-9:35 a.m.
Engage Online Customers With Emotional Experience Design

Ron Rogowski
, Principal Analyst, Forrester

Sponsored by Rightnow

Entries For Forrester's Voice Of The Customer Awards 2010 — Wow!

Harley Manning

We just finished judging the entries for Forrester's Voice of the Customer Awards 2010. Announcing the winners will have to wait until we’re onstage at the Customer Experience Forum in New York on June 29. But there is something I want to announce right now: I am really impressed by the entries! :-)

Because I was also a judge last year, I couldn’t help but notice some big changes from last year. Here they are in no particular order:

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Trends In Customer Experience

Paul Hagen

I’m moderating the “Trends in Customer Experience” panel at the upcoming “Customer Experience Forum” in New York on June 29th and 30th… and couldn’t be more excited.  In preparation for the event, I’ve been talking with my panelists, who include: Kathleen Cattrall, Vice President of Branded Customer Experience for Time Warner Cable; Neff Hudson, Assistant Vice President of Member Experience at USAA; and Janice Brown, Manager of Channel Strategy and Orchestration at FedEx. Among others, here are three reasons to come see this session:

  • Building an organization-wide customer experience movement. Kathleen is a powerhouse who describes her work in terms of a grassroots revolution. She credits, in part, Time Warner Cable’s 14-point CxPi jump this past year to her success at making customer experience the key agenda item for a 3-day set of sessions with 400 senior leaders company-wide.
     
  • Orchestrating cross-channel strategy. Janice devotes her waking hours to orchestrating customer experience across channels, which makes her a treasure trove of ideas about getting buy-in from a diverse group of leaders company-wide.
     
  • Integrating marketing, sales, and service. Customer experience veteran Neff Hudson focuses on this integration, ensuring quality across all customer touchpoints, including social media, call center, IVR, Web, mobile, and face-to-face. He has great perspective on bringing the customer voice into new product design, which includes USAA’s launch of Deposit@Mobile, a mobile app that lets members deposit checks using the camera in their smartphone.

Returning To Forrester

Paul Hagen

I’m delighted to return to Forrester and its Customer Experience team after eight years of running my own business and technology strategy consulting practice.  

I’m returning to the same group in which I worked before with Harley Manning and his team. It was in that group that I helped develop and implement Forrester’s Web Site Usability methodology, wrote reports like “Must Search Stink?” and “Smart Personalization,” promoted the use of customer data intelligence and CRM systems to drive proactive interactions that I called “Tier Zero Customer Service,” and reported on the uses of early community-based tools for customer service (today it's "social CRM").

A frequent question that I've been asked in the scores of phone calls over the past several weeks since my return has been: What are you going to cover? The short term answer is primarily four topic areas: 

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CEO As Chief Customer Officer

Harley Manning

In preparation for our upcoming Customer Experience Forum in New York at the end of June, I’ve been having phone discussions with our speakers and their people. Yesterday Robinette Dixon from Sprint pointed out something I hadn’t quite realized. Two of the companies that are speaking have a lot in common despite the fact that they could hardly be in more different industries.

First there’s Sprint. Dan Hesse took over as CEO of Sprint, which is headquartered in Kansas, in December of 2007.  He immediately made customer experience a priority and set out to ingrain customer experience into the company’s culture and processes. You can see evidence of the results in the 15 percentage point rise Sprint made this year in our Customer Experience Index.

Then there’s H&R Block. Our Day Two speaker, Sabrina Wiewel, is Chief Tax Network Officer at that company, which is also based in Kansas. But the bigger coincidence (no, this isn’t a post about Kansas) is that H&R Block also got a new CEO recently: Russ Smyth, who took over in August of 2008. Like Hesse, Smyth made customer experience a priority. Among other changes he literally flipped the corporate org chart upside down to put customers at the top, and re-engineered how the field offices interact with customers.

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US Consumers Aren't Satisfied With Web-Store Shopping

Adele Sage

Forrester surveyed US consumers about their satisfaction with Web-to-store and store-to-Web transitions in three retail segments — apparel/accessories/footwear, consumer electronics, and wireless phones and service.

The results: Satisfaction with both Web-to-store and store-to-Web shopping is low.

  • Consumer electronics: 66% satisfied with Web-to-store shopping, and 55% satisfied with store-to-Web shopping.
  • Apparel/footwear/accessories: 60% satisfied with Web-to-store shopping, and 53% satisfied with store-to-Web shopping.
  • Wireless products and services: 54% satisfied with Web-to-store shopping, and 48% satisfied with store-to-Web shopping.

Some of our other findings:

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What Makes A Centralized Customer Experience Team Successful?

Megan Burns

Last week I met with a group in charge of driving improvements to the company’s enterprise customer experience. They’re a small team with a big task – make the company culture more customer-centric. What makes the challenge even harder is that this team lacks the formal authority to force other organizations to change the way they do business. Instead they have to make people want to do things differently.

During the meeting they asked a question that I often hear from clients – what have other people like us done that has worked?  I had just completed a new report on that topic and was able to share some of the key findings from that research. Here’s a quick summary of what I told them:

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