Presenting the 2013 Forrester Wave on Webconferencing

Philipp Karcher

Webconferencing is an important, multipurpose technology used by a quarter of information workers, half of which use it for work every day. It is a mature technology, with several vendors' products making it into the Leaders category of our evaluation. The Forrester Wave report updates our previous evaluation of the market and includes 11 products:

Adobe Connect, AT&T Connect, Cisco WebEx, Citrix GoToMeeting, FuzeBox FuzeMeeting, IBM Sametime*, IBM SmartCloud Meetings, InterCall Unified Meeting, Microsoft Lync, PGi GlobalMeet, and Saba Meeting.

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Deutsche Telekom ought to play a more central role as energy sector ecosystems manager

Dan Bieler

By Dan Bieler and Holger Kisker

At its annual Energy Analyst And Sourcing Advisor Event in Berlin, Deutsche Telekom/T-Systems re-emphasized its commitment to service the energy sector with a dedicated offering. Over the last three years, Deutsche Telekom has spent significant resources in building up expertise to become a platform and service provider for the utility sector. Our main observations during the event were that Deutsche Telekom:

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iOS7 on iPhone 5s Amps Up Apple's Focus On The Business Mobile Ecosystem

Ted Schadler
Apple's announcement yesterday of a new high-end iPhone running its new iOS7 operating system got lots of attention for improvements in things that consumers care about: fashion, entertainment, photography, device protection, and health, for example. My colleague Charles Golvin went deeper to analyze what these improvements mean to Apple's prospects as a premium phone maker.
 
Perhaps lost in the coverage was what the combination of new hardware and new software means for how businesses can use iPhones at work. The battle now is for business application developers and vendors, and Apple is on it. The formula for business success has become great products + great features for developers to harness + a great way to distribute and sell custom and commercial business apps. Apple's announcement yesterday focuses on the first two elements of that formula:
  • A focus on management APIs in iOS7 gives business software vendors new hooks to provide business-ready solutions. My colleague Christian Kane has written a Forrester report on the five major improvements in the control APIs. While an iPhone will never natively provide all the lockdown that a security-conscious CIO might want, Apple has consistently listened to the needs of mobile device and mobile application management. With these new APIs, the ecosystem of security and management vendors can ramp up their products to support CIOs rolling out BYO iPhone programs. Already, MobileIron has talked about what it will do to take advantage of this.
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Getting The Most Out Of Open Data: Adaptive Intelligence For Better Social Outcomes

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Earlier this summer, I participated in Convergence 2013 in Paris with Christian Frisch, cofounder and CTO of Data Publica. In our session, we discussed the evolution of open data programs looking at the changing goals of cities and other public sector organizations as well as the persistent challenges they face. 

The momentum for open government and open data has certainly grown over the past few years. The initial push for open data was to know exactly where the government was spending money. With the economic downturn of 2008, that was imperative — and still is. In the US, USAspending.gov and Recovery.gov published government budgets and allocation of spending from the US Recovery Act. In the UK, Where Does My Money Go? similarly publishes government spending by department and region. Yet open data does more than increase transparency and accountability. We’ve seen some great strides in civic innovation — new apps for finding out when the bus is coming or where the nearest toilets are. Open data generates business innovation as well — new lines of business for existing companies and new startup businesses in a wide range of industries from healthcare to real estate to financial services. 

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Meet The Mobile Mind Shift In Forrester's Podcast Series

Ted Schadler
A mobile moment occurs whenever someone reaches for their smartphone or tablet. And happens anytime they have an itch to scratch. And it's happening more frequently than ever as your customers and your employees are undergoing a mobile mind shift -- "the expectation that I can immediately get what I want in my personal context on my mobile device."
 
If it's your customer that's having a mobile moment, then you want to be there, don't you?
 
At Forrester, we've been spending a lot of time analyzing how mobile devices change the way companies engage their customers and employees. Across every role we serve, we're probing on what makes mobile different from PCs, different from Web, and different from traditional channels. My colleague Julie Ask and I spent some time recently with Tom Pohlmann, Forrester's Chief Marketing & Strategy Officer, to talk the mobile mind shift and what to do about it. You can hear that conversation in its entirety (episode 1) or in topic-sized chunks (episodes 2, 3, and 4) below.
 
 
Episode 1
Title: Embrace The Mobile Mind Shift
Description:  When it comes to mobile, most companies are simply doing “old things in new ways.” Mobile’s great promise is provide new value where organizations will internalize mobile to do “new things in new ways.” 
 
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Introducing a New Program for CIOs at the World's Largest Firms

Sharyn Leaver

As the Practice Leader for the CIO role at Forrester, I have talked at length with many of our CIO clients about how they’d like to engage with Forrester - particularly when it comes to our Forrester Leadership Board community. Our current CIO Group is a robust community and I wanted to learn more.

A pattern quickly emerged - our CIO clients with 250+ FTEs want to interact with Forrester differently: their needs are focused on developing their team, and they want different deliverables than our core CIO Group.

Therefore, we designed a new program for these CIOs with more than 250 FTEs: The CIO Executive Program.

Offered exclusively to CIOs at the biggest global companies of $5b+, The CIO Executive Program addresses the unique challenges and opportunities faced by technology leaders at the world’s largest firms: a need to support and develop the leaders on their team, no time to read research or talk to analysts themselves, a desire to bounce ideas off of and be challenged by true peers, and a need to benchmark their IT organization against others.  

If you are interested in learning more about this program, to find out if you qualify, or would like to recommend someone for this exclusive program, please email us at flb@forrester.com.

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Nokia Solutions and Services after Nokia

Dan Bieler

As many market observers had expected for sometime, Nokia closed the chapter on what can only be described as a dramatic climb-down for what once was the world’s leading mobile player. Nokia agreed to sell its Devices & Services business to Microsoft for 5.4 billion euros. What does this mean for Nokia Solutions and Services (NSN), formerly Nokia Siemens Networks? I have several observations:

  • I expect that more change for both Nokia and NSN lies ahead. Nobody can accuse Nokia of shying away from fundamental transformations: from pulp producer, to electronic component supplier, to mobile phone company, to now what resembles a holding company looking after a network infrastructure business (NSN), a cloud-based mapping service (HERE), and a patents and a licensing operation (Advanced Technologies). I see no synergies between these operations. Hence, a breakup of Nokia followed by an initial public offering of NSN could be one possibility. At the Mobile World Congress 2013, NSN presented itself in a manner what - to me - looked like dressing up for an IPO: a lean and mean provider of mobile broadband network solutions.
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The Battle To Serve Your Digital Self

Frank Gillett

Forrester’s surveys show that individuals all over the world are using personal cloud technologies to store their personal and work stuff — files, contacts, photos, music, and videos — in online services. In the US, 77% of online adults use one or more of these services, while in Europe 61% do so. As a result, there’s now a new Internet gold rush to help you build your “digital self” — to help you access, manage, and benefit from your digital information using any smartphone, tablet, PC, or web browser.

Once your digital self is stored in online services, it becomes possible for providers to serve you with not only automated storage but also advice. These providers do things like automatically uploading your digital photos, synchronizing your contacts everywhere, and automatically assembling your expense report from photos, scans, or emails of receipts. Or even advising you on the right financial strategy or workout times based on your spending logs and work calendar.

The companies offering these services are a mix of leading startups, big tech companies, and new players.

For example, Phil Libin created Evernote to help you remember everything easily after he grew frustrated at fiddling with files to organize information from work and home. Now Evernote has 45 million accounts and a new deal to serve Telefonica’s wireless customers worldwide. When you enter new notes, Evernote suggests related notes from your notebooks and those of coworkers you’re linked to.

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Microsoft Buys Nokia Devices As A Major Building Block Of Its Devices+Services Strategy

Ted Schadler

Microsoft acquired Nokia's devices business for $7.2 billion (which is only 27% of Microsoft's 2013 earnings and just 9% of its cash and short-term investments). Microsoft bought the devices and some of the services along with the services of former Microsoft Office leader Stephen Elop, who will run Microsoft's Devices business. By all accounts, Stephen was a much-admired Microsoft executive when he left to run Nokia in 2010.

I'll leave telecom industry analysis of the deal in the worthy hands of my colleagues Thomas Husson and Charles Golvin. I'll leave journalistic speculation to the media. I'll leave personality analysis to the pop psychologists. But as a software+devices+services industry analyst, I'll share my analysis of how this acquisition changes Microsoft's position in the mobile mind shift.

  • First, this acquisition is a clear stepping stone in Microsoft's transition from a software company to a software-led multiproduct company. Apple pioneered the model of vertical integration in devices: device+software+services. Google quickly mastered it. Microsoft has now proven that it is willing and able to make the tough decisions to make a vertically integrated product a cornerstone of its business model.
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It's Harvest Time For Vodafone In The US

Dan Bieler

Alas: It has finally happened. Vodafone has sold its 45% stake in Verizon Wireless to Verizon for $130 billion in a part cash ($58.9 billion) and part equity deal. The deal values the 45% stake at 9.4 times EBITDA. Markets had been speculating about this deal for years, so why has it taken place now? Arguably, the decision was made easier by Verizon’s share price, which is at a decade high, as well the the potential for rising interest rates. From Vodafone’s perspective, our main observations are that:

  • The deal is strategic for Vodafone and financial for Verizon. While the deal is a strategic transaction for Vodafone – it has decided to exit the US market – it is a financial transaction for Verizon: It already controlled Verizon Wireless through its 55% stake in the business. But after Vodafone’s exit, Verizon can keep the cash and no longer needs to pay out a dividend to Vodafone. It can instead use this retained dividend cash flow for capital expenditures and other investments to help boost its position in an increasingly competitive US wireless market (e.g., Softbank + Sprint; T-Mobile + MetroPCS).
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