Are big companies in big cities different in emerging markets?

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Jennifer Bélissent [Posted by Jennifer Bélissent]

In a recent discussion with execs at Intel about how to position netbooks into emerging market, someone raised the question about how different technology buyers in metro areas in emerging markets are from those in mature markets.  Are tech buyers in the Tier 1 cities in China — Shanghai, for example — any different from those in New York, London, or Paris?  I was reminded of this discussion when reading one of Mark Beckford’s Disruptive Leadership blog entries, “10 Things You Must Do To Win in Emerging Markets”.

Mark looks at Shanghai and says that it is more like New York and Paris than like rural parts of China.  In my new blog entry at B2B Beyond Borders, I examine this claim and the how different economic drivers influence purchases in different markets and regions.  I encourage you to give it a read.

Videoconferencing Heats Up

Claire Schooley

by Claire Schooley and Ted Schadler

This podcast cover's Cisco's recent acquisition of Tandberg and what it means for Cisco moving forward. The podcast also covers different forms of Web conferencing from Telepresence to single computer HD conferencing. The podcast concludes with expectations for the market and advice for companies who are considering video conferencing.

http://a964.g.akamaitech.net/f/964/714/1h/www.forrester.com/role_based/images/author/imported/forresterDotCom/Podcasts/IKM/Claire%20Schooley_Ted%20Schadler_Videoconferencing_Heats_Up.mp3

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Reaching real tech buyers in emerging markets virtually. Really!

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Jennifer Bélissent [Posted by Jennifer Bélissent]

Not all technology buyers in emerging markets are accessing the internet from mobile phones or dial-up connections.  In fact, many places in countries considered "emerging markets" are rapidly resembling more mature markets, in income levels and especially in mobility, internet access, and now broadband penetration.  Shanghai, for one, is probably better connected than some cities in the middle of the US.  What does that mean for technology marketers?  It means that they can leverage their complete toolbox of marketing tools to reach those audiences -- and increasingly they are doing just that.

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Does The Federal CIO Set The Transparency Bar Higher For Everyone Else?

Sharyn Leaver

by Sharyn Leaver

Sharyn-Leaver It has been an interesting year – who would have thought that the federal government would have done such a thing – provided a Federal IT Dashboard of allocation of federal IT dollars to investments for all of us out there in citizen-land to read? Federal CIO, Vivek Kundra, announced it and the keyword of the effort that made the headlines is "radical transparency."  It’s very clever in its design and visuals – "mashup ready." It would be especially appealing if the shell of the software would be made available to anyone who wants it – since some real (taxpayer) money went into this project.

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What keeps your customers up at night?

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Jennifer Bélissent [Posted by Jennifer Bélissent]

Adapting marketing messages to specific audiences is a topic I’ve written on here and in a few of my Forrester reports.  Getting the messages right requires an understanding of the drivers and motivations of buyers.  And, going into new geographical markets means that you’ll need local knowledge; you can’t assume that you know what will resonate in a particular market.  Recently I came across an example that illustrates the point in The Blue Sweater: Bridging the Gap Between Rich and Poor in an Interconnected World, by Jacqueline Novogratz, Founder and CEO of Acumen Fund.

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The State Of US Workforce Technology Adoption

Ted Schadler

Ted-Schadler by Ted Schadler

Did you know that among US information workers that:

  • 35% use laptops and 76% use desktop computers?

  • Only 11% use smartphones?

  • 57% are optimistic about technology, but 43% are pessimistic?

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Gen Yers Won’t Make Companies Collaborative – Tools Integrated Into Business Processes Will

TJ Keitt

A few weeks ago, my colleage Ted Schadler caused a bit of a stir when he revealed – shockingly! – Gen Xers were actually leading the social technology revolution for information and knowledge management – not Gen Yers. I want to double down on this idea: Gen Yers aren’t driving the business use of any collaboration technologies. In a report that I’ve just completed, we show that despite their much ballyhooed technical savvy, Gen Yers are just as apathetic toward all of the fancy new collaboration software – like web conferencing and team workspaces – as their older colleagues. You’ll note I said “apathetic.” Well, beyond email and calendars, information workers really aren’t using these tools. If that gives strategists and marketers at the software giants that produce these tools pause, the fact that Gen Yers still see their organizations as collaborative, even though they don’t use “collaboration tools,” should be alarming.

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Bridge the Financial Divide with Netbooks

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Jennifer Bélissent [Posted by Jennifer Bélissent]

There was a great mobile banking article in the Economist last week.   It reminded me of a report written by GSMA on its Mobile Money for the Unbanked initiative that came out a few months back.  The GSMA report points out that mobility penetrMobile penetration and financial accessation is much higher in emerging markets than is access to financial services — an opportunity for mobile operators and banks to work together to bridge the financial divide.  So, I began mulling the opportunity that these trends provide for netbook adoption:  why don’t netbook vendors partner with local banks to deliver financial services via 3G-enabled netbooks.

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Have CIOs Scared Vendors Into Silence?

Sharyn Leaver

by Sharyn Leaver

Sharyn-Leaver

We had a pretty good idea recently (or so we thought) to look at the relationship between CIOs and their strategic vendor partners. The idea was to take a different perspective — ask the vendors for best practices and for not-so-great practices — hoping for examples that could be used to guide CIOs.  So we made a list of likely strategic vendors for CIOs — the likes of HP, IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP — and pushed a request out to multiple vendor analyst relations contacts.

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Cisco Buys Tandberg On Its Way To Be Your B2B Video Conferencing Partner

Ted Schadler

 

Ted-Schadler

by Ted Schadler

 

I spent a day with Tandberg management last week and came away very impressed with some things I can't share and also some things that I can share. Tandberg has:

  • Great HD videoconferencing solutions in room-sized all the way down to Webcam. Yep, a Webcam image looks great in a telepresence room. These guys get telepresence and end point integration.

  • A management toolkit that works at enterprise scale. It's an appliance + video network management solution. This is based on the Codian products that Tandberg acquired. They call it "infrastructure" but I think of it as the NOC for video.

  • A commitment to video standards. Take note, Cisco: This will be CRITICAL to business adoption of video for partner collaboration.

  • A strong focus on interoperability among network protocols, end points, and video codecs. The Codian acquisition clearly gave them some serious engineering. The goal is to keep the old stuff in the mix as firms build on out their new stuff. It looked good in demo, anyway.

  • Strong financials, customer base, and growth. This company is well run and winning share in its market. That team will remain in place.

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