Telstra Analyst Event 2013: Report From The Customer Advocacy Journey Triathlon

Dan Bieler

With Dane Anderson, John Brand, Tim Sheedy, Clement Teo, and Bryan Wang

During his keynote at Telstra’s recent annual analyst event in Sydney, the CEO compared Telstra’s customer advocacy strategy to a triathlon that the firm has just begun. We believe this is a fitting analogy for progress communicated at the event. Our main observations are:

  • Telstra’s transformation remains a work in progress. Telstra is not unique from other incumbent telcos that transform away from traditional — and declining — sources of revenue. Its strong domestic position seems secure for now. But its prospects in new market categories, both inside and outside of Australia, are less certain. Telstra is not particularly innovative compared with telcos in the US or Europe. Yet Telstra benefits from a credible transformation strategy, which it is gradually implementing. For instance, Telstra has built a large IP-based digital media file exchange platform to serve global broadcasters and content providers.
  • Telstra ought to use its Net Promoter Score to drive cultural change. Its strategic goal to push for world-class customer advocacy is a key differentiator and convincing. However, we believe Telstra needs to use the NPS also as a driver of internal cultural change. For instance, Telstra should analyse transactional processes of device purchasing from branded retail stores. Moreover, Forrester research indicates that NPS has limits when it comes to explaining the “how” and “why” of customer experience.
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Where Is IBM’s Sweet Spot In Asia Pacific?

Tim Sheedy
Over the past few years, IBM has certainly copped its fair share of criticism in the Asian media, particularly in Australia. Whether this criticism is deserved or not is beside the point. Perception is reality — and it’s led some companies and governments to exclude IBM from project bids and longer-term sourcing deals. On top of this, the firm’s recent earnings in Asia Pacific have disappointed.
 
But I’ve had the chance to spend some quality time with IBM at analyst events across Asia Pacific over the past 12 months, and it’s clear that the company does some things well — in fact, IBM is sometimes years ahead of the pack. For this reason, I advise clients that it would be detrimental to exclude IBM from a deal that may play to one of these strengths.
 
IBM’s value lies in the innovation and global best practices it can bring to deals; the capabilities coming out of IBM Labs and the resulting products, services, and capabilities continue to lead the industry. IBM is one of the few IT vendors whose R&D has struck the right balance between shorter-term business returns and longer-term big bets.
 
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Ericsson is pulling away from its core competition — but this brings it closer to new competitors

Dan Bieler

Ericsson is well on its way to being a prime driver of transformation in the Networked Society, as Ericsson describes its vision. I do not question the leading position of Ericsson’s core network activities. But compared to last year’s EMEA Analyst Event, Ericsson has made noticeable progress in its ambition to become a network-focused provider of ICT services because it:

  • Has a clearer perspective of what it is trying to achieve for its enterprise customers. Ericsson is much more specific about which types of enterprise customers it is catering to with what types of services. It targets sectors that face a high degree of mobile disruption and that rely on secure networks for real-time information transmission. In addition to the public and media sectors, which Ericsson has been focusing on for some time, it serves utilities and transport and logistics companies. At the event, Ericsson showcased its strong capabilities and vertical expertise for the media sector in the form of media delivery networks and broadcasting services.
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Winners Of The 2013 Forrester Groundswell Awards (Business-To-Employee Category)

Philipp Karcher
Every year Forrester’s Groundswell Awards recognize the most innovative social and mobile programs with a measurable business impact. Once again in the business-to-employee (B2E) category we received many outstanding examples of companies empowering their employees with these technologies to solve customer and business problems. This year’s entries highlight a growing sophistication in how companies are applying mobile and social to transform their operations. This year’s entries featured:
 
  • More complex mobile and social technology integrations. Both our Mobile winner and runner-up combined mobile forms and location data with a social application to more efficiently allocate resources in the field. We received multiple entries in the Collaboration category featuring companies applying gamification to communities and to CRM, and as well as integrations between real-time and asynchronous collaboration tools. These integrations multiply the power of the technologies and create new and interesting use cases. 
  • More targeted customer impacting applications. Customer-facing employees often represent a direct opportunity to show the business impact of social and mobile technologies. This year’s entries saw a number of applications to empower sales, field operations, and customer service roles with tools to increase customer engagement and improve satisfaction scores by speeding up delivery and equipping employees with the right information.
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Glimpse Conference 2013 Takeaways: Systems Of Engagement Need Access To Personal Data

Michael Yamnitsky

We attended the recent Glimpse Conference 2013, where members of New York's tech scene came together at Bloomberg headquarters to talk about social discovery, predictive analytics, and customer engagement.

Our key takeaway from the event: small, real-time data coming from very personal apps like email, calendar, social, and other online services will fuel next-level predictive apps and services. Specifically:

•    Better insight doesn’t require more data; it needs the right data. Amassing large databases of customer profiles, purchase history, and web browser activity only goes so far, and is costing companies millions, if not billions of dollars every year. Mikael Berner from EasilyDo sees a new opportunity in better utilizing data scattered across personal email indices, calendars, social networks, and file and content repositories that directly indicate customers’ plans, interests, and motivations. 

•    Email, calendar, and location data is a goldmine for predictive analytics. Expedia or TripAdvisor can track web activities to recall a user searched for hotels last November and is likely to travel again this year, but a flight confirmation sitting in email or vacation time logged in calendar is a much stronger indicator of travel plans.

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Reality Check: Enterprise Social Does Not Stem Email Overload

Philipp Karcher
Email overload is a hot topic. Replace “email” in the title of this post with “message” and the point becomes more obvious. 
 
Summary: Social displaces some interactions that are inefficient over email, but overall introduces more messages for workers to sift through. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, many organizations invest in enterprise social for the additional collaborative interaction (i.e., messaging) it facilitates. 
 
First, let’s look at how social displaces some interactions that are inefficient over email. In contrast to a private model -- which relies on addressing specific individuals and restricting who can see messages -- a public model allows everyone to more easily:
 
  1. Find someone who can help. Social platforms elevate experts based on their rich profiles, contributions to the community, and recognition by others. Addressing a larger group also improves the chances the right person will see your message. This avoids what IBM calls the squirrel hunt when you start pinging people to ask “Can you help me with this or direct me to someone who can?"
  2. Surface and participate in relevant discussions. We’ve all been annoyed by massive reply-all email chains. Rather than depend on being forwarded or copied at some point in an important email chain and be unnecessarily looped in on others, social tools allow us to choose to participate in relevant discussions. By electing to get notifications or watching the activity in a particular channel or group we stay "in the know” and can jump in or stay out.
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Old ROI Methods Are Holding Back The Adoption Of New Technology

Andrew Bartels

My colleagues at Forrester and I have been puzzling over the discrepancy between the wealth of attractive new mobile, cloud, and smart computing technologies in the market, and the relatively weak record of actual growth in tech spending that our tech market forecasting numbers show.  Certainly, the recessions in Europe and weak economies in the US, Japan, China, India, Brazil and other emerging markets explain part of the weakness in tech buying.  In addition, cloud computing’s impact on the timing of tech spending (reducing initial upfront capital purchases of owned hardware and software while increasing future subscription payments for use of these resources) means that  spending that in the past would have occurred in current years has now been pushed into the future.  Lastly, as a recent Economist article pointed out, business investment in general has been low compared to GDP and to cash distributed to shareholders this decade, as CEOs with stock option compensation have focused on meeting quarterly earnings-per-share targets instead of investing for the longer term (see Buttonwood, “The Profits Prophet,” The Economist, October 5, 2013). Still, even taking these factors into account, tech investment has been growing more slowly relative to economic activity than in past cycles of tech innovation and growth.

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Smart City Santander: Proven Technology, Uncertain Business Models

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

The city of Santander boasts 20,000 fixed and mobile sensors throughout the city – on buses, in parks, waste bins and in buildings.  These sensors capture bus locations, humidity in the air and soil, pollution etc. They tell bus riders when their bus will arrive; they tell city park workers when to water the gardens. They also dim lights when there is no one on the street at night, and turn them on when cars or pedestrians pass. They create a complex internet of things and a rich source of data. Together with the platform enabling the aggregation, analysis and visualization of these data, they (will) provide a valuable tool at the disposal of city leaders, enterprises, developers and citizens. Today Smart Santander is a living lab (with an application pending to be part of the European Network of Living Labs). 

Having launched in September 2010 with €6 million budget (primarily from the EU) and 15 partners, the project is now in its 3rd and final phase.  With its sensor network, the city demonstrates the benefits of the Internet of Things across several initiatives:

  • Urban mobility: Sensors on buses and in taxis make it easier for citizens and tourists to find transportation; parking sensors help drivers find available places more quickly.
  • Water management: Sensors embedded in urban gardens detect soil humidity and enable more efficient watering; the broader water initiative envisions smart water meters in homes and buildings, and use of the sensors by Aqualia, the city’s water company.
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The Canadian Tech Market Continues To Underperform In 2013, But Will Pick Up The Pace In 2014

Andrew Bartels

Relative to both Canada's economic growth and the US tech market, Canadian business and government purchases of information and communication technologies (ICT) has lagged since 2011. Spooked by European debt problems, uncertain growth prospects in its US and Asian export markets, and the strong Canadian dollar, business executives have been holding back on making tech investments.  That pattern has continued in 2013, with our latest Canadian tech market report projecting growth of just 2.2% in Canadian ICT purchases in 2013 when measured in Canadian dollars (see October 25, 2013, “The Canadian Tech Market 2013 To 2014 – Sluggish Canadian Tech Market Will Accelerate In 2014”).  Business and government purchases of computer equipment will be down 0.2% in 2013, purchases of communications equipment will rise by just 0.9%, and spending on IT outsourcing and telecommunications services will increase by 2.6% and 0.7%, respectively.  The best tech sectors in a generally weak Canadian tech market will be software (with 5.8% growth) and IT consulting and systems integration services (with 3.6% growth).  

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US Tech Spending Growth Slows To Under 4% in 2013 Due Federal Budget Cuts And Shutdowns

Andrew Bartels

The Congressional juveniles with their calls for big Federal budgets cuts, tolerance of Federal government shutdowns and flirting with Federal debt defaults have been put back into their corner, so it is time to assess how much damage they have done to the US tech market.  In Forrester’s semi-annual US tech market update, we conclude that the Federal budget sequestration, the two-week Federal government shutdown, and the fallout from threats to not raise the Federal debt ceiling have shaved about two percentage points of growth from business and government spending on technology goods and services in 2013 (October 25, 2013, “Government Spending Brinksmanship Drags Down The 2013 US Tech Market Outlook – We Cut Our 2013 Spending Growth Estimate To 3.9% From 5.7%”).

Not surprisingly, government tech spending has borne the brunt of the slowdown, with Federal government buying down while state and local government tech purchases rose modestly.  But since the effects of reduced Federal spending have flowed into the private sector, purchases of computer equipment have also slumped, as cautious CIOs dial back their spending on these easily deferred categories of the tech budget.  Servers and PCs have been especially hard hit as alternatives like infrastructure-as-a-service (instead of buying servers) and tablets (as replacements for laptops) accentuated CIO caution.  However, there is evidence that even corporate purchases of tablets have slowed in 2013 as the initial rush to put these new devices into the hands of employees has been way to a more measured adoption curve.

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