The Cost of PRISM Will Be Larger Than ITIF Projects

James Staten

Earlier this month The Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (ITIF) published a prediction that the U.S. cloud computing industry stands to lose up to $35 billion by 2016 thanks to the National Security Agency (NSA) PRISM project, leaked to the media in June. We think this estimate is too low and could be as high as $180 billion or a 25% hit to overall IT service provider revenues in that same timeframe. That is, if you believe the assumption that government spying is more a concern than the business benefits of going cloud.

Having read through the thoughtful analysis by Daniel Castro at ITIF, we commend him and this think tank on their reasoning and cost estimates. However the analysis really limited the impact to the actions of non-US corporations. The high-end figure, assumes US-based cloud computing providers would lose 20% of the potential revenues available from the foreign market. However we believe there are two additional impacts that would further be felt from this revelation:

1. US customers would also bypass US cloud providers for their international and overseas business - costing these cloud providers up to 20% of this business as well.

2. Non-US cloud providers will lose as much as 20% of their available overseas and domestic opportunities due to other governments taking similar actions.

Let's examine these two cases in a bit more detail.

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Are Cloud Developers Really That Different? Yes.

James Staten

To an IT leader a cloud developer can easily look like the enemy. They don't do what you say, they cause havoc by circumventing your IT rules and building new services and capabilities on public cloud platforms and seem to take orders not from you but from the business unit. Are these perceptions reality? Well, according to the 2013 Forrester ForrSights Developer Survey, yes. But they are also some of your most productive, happy and loyal developers too.

The survey shows that less than a quarter of all enterprise developers are using cloud platforms today. Examining the first movers, as self-identified in this survey, we found significant differences in the behavior, attitude and reporting structure of these members of your IT team. Cloud developers are risk takers who are empowered, more comfortable with open source technologies, building the new systems of engagement and tend to be happier in their work. They aren't just experimenting either; they are putting applications into production on the public cloud platforms and are doing so with traditional programming languages via agile, modern application designs. Forrester clients can now download a toolkit report providing a snapshot view of the data from this compelling survey (in Microsoft PowerPoint and PDF formats) that shows what distinguishes these developers from the pack.

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Mobile Engagement Providers Are A New $32.4 Billion Market By 2018

Ted Schadler
My colleague and friend John McCarthy and I have just published a new report on the emergence of a new category of vendors we call “mobile engagement providers” that help firms build excellent mobile experiences. I’ll unpack the report in a series of posts over the next few weeks. You can also read a lengthy post in the Wall Street Journal highlighting the report and Forrester clients can read the full report.
 
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Building and delivering great mobile experiences will be the beating heart of your customer engagement strategy for the next 10 years. The challenge of making a simple, intuitive app that fronts a complex system of engagement will stretch the abilities and swamp the resources of most firms. For help, firms increasingly turn to vendors that possess a connected portfolio of engagement competencies and management skills. 
 
The result will be a new market for mobile engagement providers that will grow to $32.4 billion by 2018 (see the Figure 1). No vendor can do all of this today, but suppliers from six categories — digital agencies, management consultancies, mobile specialists, product development specialists, systems integrators, and telcos — are chasing the prize. The payoff for vendors that make this investment will be to earn a seat at your table as a long-term partner in your engagement success.
 
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Wanted: Mobile Engagement Providers

Ted Schadler

Pal John McCarthy and I published a report on a new category of vendors that we call mobile engagement providers that have a "complete portfolio of engagement competencies and management skills to help you build and deliver great mobile experiences at global scale." This market will grow to $32.4 billion by 2018.

The Wall Street Journal's CIO Journal published this post from us today. It's long, but captures the key points.

I'll have more say later in the week. But for now, enjoy the post on WSJ!

Sharp Decline of The Indian Rupee Drives CIO Focus on Business Outcomes

Manish Bahl

On August 6, 2013, the Indian rupee plunged to a record low of INR61.80 to 1USD. In fact, since January 2013, the Indian rupee has depreciated by 10% against USD and is expected to slide further as India is challenged by political gridlock, serious infrastructure bottlenecks, and decreased investor confidence, all of which are contributing to a slowdown in economic growth. The declining rupee leads directly to increases in the cost of doing business, which has risen by 8-10% over the past year.

The difficult economic landscape has forced Indian firms to look for new and innovative ways to grow their businesses, create efficiencies, and improve responsiveness. This is driving changes in how Indian business leaders view technology – with many increasingly viewing technology as a far more critical means to differentiate their organizations and drive business growth. The pressure is now firmly on CIOs to deliver technology-led business outcomes for their organizations. To exploit this opportunity, CIOs should do the following:

Develop a ‘business outcomes’ matrix and map existing and planned technology projects against it to build credibility with business leaders: ROI templates are generally developed to gain approvals and are typically limited to cost savings, but very few CIOs actually link their IT spending to clearly defined business outcomes. Define what business outcome means to your organization (e.g., increase in sales, revenue, customer acquisition, customer satisfaction to name few) and map each of your projects against the matrix to prioritize those with greatest business outcomes. This will help CIOs win buy-in from business stakeholders on project funding and priorities, while ensuring that IT is viewed as an equal and capable business partner.

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How Does A CIO Build The Workplace Of The Future?

TJ Keitt

Anyone who's been following this blog knows that I've invested a lot of time recently laying out the case for why CIOs should take more ownership over employee engagement and workforce experience. With the foundational argument in place, it's now time to turn to the critical question: How should an IT department act? This can be a paralyzing question because owning the workforce experience means IT leaders must step outside of traditional technology provisioning and maintenance roles. That's why the path forward for IT leaders is to implement a series of changes in how they view themselves, employees, and the technology landscape:

  • Pivot benchmarks to account for engagement's link with IT satisfaction. Traditional IT benchmarks concern the performance of the infrastructure and employees' satisfaction with the service they receive. These are indeed important measures, but they do not give a complete view of how technology helps engage employees. We recently published our benchmarks for workforce experience that lay out what CIOs should be evaluating in addition to their customary metrics. These include employee engagement measures, employee technology attitudes, where employees learn about technology and how IT plans align with employee expectations. Evaluating both IT and the workforce in such a fashion requires the buy-in of executives, particularly the head of HR who traditionally owns employee engagement and satisfaction surveys.
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US Tech Market Getting Stronger: US Q2 2013 GDP Report And Data Revisions Show Weak But Improving US Economy, And Better Tech

Andrew Bartels

The US Bureau of Economic Analysis released its preliminary report on second quarter 2013 US GDP, along with both major revisions to US economic data over the past 50 years, and minor revisions to the data on US business investment in information technology goods and services.  Here are my key takeaways from the report, and its implications for the US tech market.

  • US real GDP growth in Q2 2013 came in better than expected.  The 1.7% growth at an annual rate from Q1 2013 was in line with our projection of 1.9%, but better than what many economists had been forecasting.  Growth rates in Q4 2012 and Q1 2013 were revised down to 0.1% and 1.1%, respectively, from the earlier 0.4% and 2.5%.  These revisions indicate that the end of the payroll tax reductions, the higher tax rates for high-income people, and the Federal budget cuts from sequester did take a toll on economic growth, with government consumption declining in Q4 2012, Q1 2013, and Q2 2013, and business investment in factories and offices falling in Q1 2013.  But consumer spending has been solid, with growth of 1.8% in Q2 2013, 2.3% in Q1 2013, and 1.7% in Q2 2013.  Business investment in equipment, which softened to just 1.6% growth in Q1 2013, improved to 6.8% growth in Q2 2013.  And housing continues to be a growth engine for the US economy, with double digit growth rates in residential investment in the past four quarters, and improving home prices boosting consumer confidence and spending.
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Cities, Don't Go It Alone. Service Providers Accelerate Smart City Projects.

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Local governments – cities, counties, states – are investing in technology.  Why?  Well, a number of factors drive local governments to take a smarter approach to their administration and development: limited budgets, increasing citizen demands, competition for investment and jobs etc. Balancing competing demands on a shoestring budget isn't easy.  City leaders are looking for ways to sustainably transformation city functions such as transportation, healthcare, public safety, utilities, or governance, and in aggregate the city as a whole. And, they increasingly value technology as a means to such a transformation. 

Fortunately, cities do not have to undertake this journey on their own, and they don’t expect to.  In fact, according to Forrester’s Forrsights Budgets and Priorities Tracker Survey, local governments are more likely to expect increases in IT technical consulting than other industries (and more than governments as a whole): 38% of local government IT budget decision-makers expected a 5-10% increase in consulting spend and 2% expected an increase of more than 10%.  Local governments are turning to the experts to help them figure out what this “smart city” thing means for them.

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Master Tomorrow’s Business Outcomes With Forrester’s Summit For CIOs: India 2013

Manish Bahl

Our research shows that 70% of Indian CIOs or top IT executives will report to CEOs or the senior-most executives in their organizations by the end of 2016. As the boundary between IT and business further blurs, successful CEOs must get more directly involved in business-led technology discussions as a means to differentiate their organization, drive business growth and measure technology success by the business outcomes it delivers. This is driving a fundamental shift in the CIO role as it moves from classic "plan, build, run" cycle management to a business outcome oriented, customer obsessed leadership position. With this backdrop, Forrester holds its second series of CIO summit across Asia Pacific in August and September; the India summit is scheduled for September 3 in Mumbai and the theme of the summit is “Mastering Tomorrow’s Business Outcomes”.

We have an action-packed agenda for the India summit with great mix of Forrester analysts (Dane Anderson, Nigel Fenwick, Bobby Cameron, and Duncan Jones) and industry keynote speakers (Arun Gupta,Chief Information Officer, Cipla; Ram Medury,Vice President, Head of IT, ICICI Lombard; Rajeev Seoni, Chief Information Officer, Ernst & Young). Throughout the day, we will have interactive discussions on how digitally-empowered customers are creating urgency for change by redefining how business is won and what role CIOs can master to digitally disrupt their markets by applying technology to deliver targeted customer value faster, better, and cheaper for potential business outcomes. 

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The Expectation Gap Increases Between Business And IT Leaders

Dan Bieler

Business Technology (BT) is a means to an end. BT is there to support the business objectives. Similarly, the task of IT leaders is to provide the most appropriate technological infrastructure to all employees so that they can pursue the business objectives most effectively. In other words: IT and business leaders should have the same perspective.

Yet, new Forrester survey data indicates several gaps in opinion about network infrastructure aspects between business and IT leaders. We see a risk that IT will purchase network and collaboration assets that do not address the demand by business lines. Similarly, there is a risk that business lines remain unaware of network and collaboration assets that IT has put in place. Under both scenarios, businesses waste valuable resources and end up with an inefficient network and collaboration infrastructure.

Our new report The Expectation Gap Increases Between Business And IT Leaders helps sourcing vendor management professional define an IT and networking strategy that supports overall business goals. This report is a follow-up of our 2012 report, Prepare For The Connected Enterprise Now. Our main messages to business based on the survey results are to:

  • Drive communication infrastructure projects in collaboration with business and IT. Eight out of 10 IT and business leaders consider network and telecom technologies critical to driving staff productivity. Sourcing professionals should focus activities on driving the road map and jointly develop business cases.
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