How mobility can change the economics of IT

I recently took some holiday leave and saw two small, but clear examples of where mobility changes the economics of IT. The first was in a restaurant where the wait staff used their own smartphones and a simple order taking app. There was no expensive mobile platform for the restaurant to purchase in order to use this system. There was no expensive training program in place to teach the employees how to use the software. They simply bring along their own phone, download a free app to their device and start working.

The software is intuitive enough that any training required is done by their fellow staff members during shifts. What’s interesting about this example is that using mobile devices for taking restaurant orders isn’t new – but using employees own devices is. Previously, the expense incurred by restaurants having to purchase proprietary devices meant that only high margin operations could afford to use mobile order taking systems. And loss, theft or damage of the devices was not only expensive but also proved to be a sticking point for employer/employee relations.   

The second example provides a sharp contrast. It involved a trip to a museum and the use of the audio commentary service. Though almost every visitor to the museum now has a smart phone device, an old proprietary hand held device was still in use there. This is an expensive option to operate for a low-margin business like a museum. There are now museums that have recognised this and offer apps on smart phones with capabilities well beyond what the previous dedicated hardware could provide. One such museum is the American Museum of Natural History. It not only uses the rich visual interface of the smart phone, along with the required basic audio commentary services, but it also reportedly helps the user navigate the complex campus using sophisticated wi-fi triangulation.

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Master Tomorrow’s Business Outcomes: Forrester’s Summit for CIOs in Asia Pacific

Dane Anderson

I am thrilled to formally kick off Forrester’s Summit for CIOs in Asia Pacific.  Building on our global CIO Summit series, this year’s summits will take place in Sydney on August 27, Singapore on August 30 and Mumbai on September 3.  This year’s theme is “Mastering Tomorrow’s Business Outcomes”, because more than ever, Asia Pacific CIOs need to understand the importance of moving beyond back-end IT to align to strategic business objectives and drive innovation.

High-level Networking

When sharing my excitement about our summits, I am often asked what makes our events special.  First and foremost, our attendees appreciate the fact that we bring together the most selective and senior group of CIOs in an intimate setting to connect.  Rather than targeting the masses, our aim is to set a high threshold for the delegates that attend and then provide them with a world class experience through our thought leadership, research, tools and networking opportunities. 

Distinguished Speakers

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Cloud Economics 2.0 - German Stock Exchange - Deutsche Börse - starts cloud computing exchange

Stefan Ried

We are entering the second wave of cloud computing: The Public Cloud Economics

Most enterprises understand well cloud topologies (virtualization) and privacy levels (private, virtual-private, and public), or simply the different resource types (IaaS, PaaS, or SaaS). Some even embraced pretty sophisticated technologies like cloud bursting – the dynamic relocation of workloads. However, compared to this sophisticated understanding of technology, the understanding the current or even future economic models of cloud computing lags behind.

More than a year ago, Forrester introduced the corporate perspective of cloud economics with James Staten’s report Drive Savings And Profits With Cloud Economics. The major cloud providers surprised us also with many innovative business models, such as Amazon’s AWS Reserved Instance Marketplace last September. As an alternative to the fully flexible on-demand model, customers can also buy a one- or three-year contract for a compute instance and could save up to 60%. However, the risk is that you bought more than you need or simply the wrong instance types. The marketplace allows now selling off these half used contracts to other customers.

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The Five Questions We Don't Get About Office 365 And Google Apps But Should

TJ Keitt

The era of cloud-based collaboration technology is here. Forrester's last survey of collaboration software decision makers showed that 67% are planning to or already deploy collaboration software-as-a-service (SaaS). Buttressing this stat is the incredibly high volume of inquiries I've received over the past two quarters from business and IT leaders trying to decide between Microsoft technology and the Google portfolio. The questions were so numerous that we published a report to answer our clients' basic queries. The increased activity, however, obscures the fact that we're still in the early days. As our report shows, IT leaders are still trying to get acquainted with cloud technologies: What features are in the suite? Is it secure? Are businesses like mine using it? These are essential things to know, yes. But they don't fully tell the story of how a company can get the most out of a cloud collaboration and productivity suite implementation. So, as you examine Microsoft Office 365 and Google Apps for Business, here are five more questions you need to address at the outset:

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Amdocs Gains Momentum As A Leading Customer Experience Provider

Dan Bieler

Dan Bieler, Katyayan Gupta, Clement Teo

We recently attended Amdocs' customer event in Singapore. Amdocs is gradually adjusting its strategy to reflect one of the most fundamental changes in the ICT industry today: Increasingly, business line managers, think the marketing or sales officer, are the ones influencing sourcing decisions. Traditional decision-makers, CTOs and CIOs, are no longer the sole ICT decision-makers. Amdocs is addressing this shift by:

  • Strengthening its customer experience portfolio.Successful telcos will try to regain lost relevance through improved customer experience. Marketing, portfolio product development, and sales are therefore growing in importance for telcos. Amdocs’ integrated customer experience offering, CES 9, provides telcos with a multichannel experience; proactive care; and self-service tools.
  • Betting big on big data/analytics.Amdocs is leveraging big data/analytics to provide real-time, predictive, and prescriptive insights to telcos about their customers’ behaviour. Communications-industry-specific converged charging and billing solutions as well as other catalogue solutions give Amdocs the opportunity to provide more value to telcos than some of the other players.
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The #1 Cause Of Organizational Dysfunction

Nigel Fenwick

At some level, I see dysfunction in almost every client I work with. This isn't something new. There probably isn't an organization on the planet without some level of dysfunction. Perhaps a degree of dysfunction is acceptable or even desirable. But eventually organizational dysfunction reaches a point where it begins to impede the ability of the enterprise to function. One area where this appears to occur with great frequency is between IT and the rest of the business. In far too many organizations IT is seen as out of alignment with the business, or worse, as an impediment to business units. So why is this?

It's been my opinion for some time now that there is a root cause for almost all the dysfunction in organizations. The cause is metrics. Specifically, the metrics we use to measure employee performance. Sometimes we suffer from the unintended consequences of what appear to be sound metrics.

Take for example a conversation I recently had with a client in marketing with responsibility for e-commerce. He wanted to gain a better understanding of IT because it appeared to him they were making bad decisions. On investigation it turned out "IT" had taken the website offline in the middle of the fading day, much to the consternation of the e-commerce team. To understand why IT might do this you need to understand metrics. It turns out the help desk had received a call about a problem with SAP. In order to fix the problem with SAP, the database technician decided the fastest repair would require restarting SAP. Unfortunately the website was tied to SAP so when it went down, so too did the website. Had the help desk and the database engineer not been measured on how long it takes to repair a problem, they may have made a different decision.

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Google enterprise roadshow 2013: shooting for the moon

Dan Bieler

I attended Google’s annual atmosphere road show recently, an event aimed at presenting solutions for business customers. The main points I took away were:

  • Google’s “mosaic” approach to portfolio development offers tremendous potential. Google has comprehensive offerings covering communications and collaboration solutions (Gmail, Google Plus), contextualized services (Maps, Compute Engine), application development (App Engine), discovery and archiving (Search, Vault), and access tools to information and entertainment (Nexus range, Chromebook/Chromebox).
  • Google’s approach to innovation sets an industry benchmark. Google is going for 10x innovation, rather than the typical industry approach of pursuing 10% incremental improvements. Compared with its peers, this “moonshot” approach is unorthodox. However, moonshot innovation constitutes a cornerstone of Google’s competitive advantage. It requires Google’s team to think outside established norms. One part of its innovation drive encourages staff to spend 20% of their work time outside their day-to-day tasks. Google is a rare species of company in that it does not see failure if experiments don’t work out. Google cuts the losses, looks at the lessons learned — and employees move on to new projects.
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Why Customer Experience Will Become The #1 CIO Priority

Nigel Fenwick

Customer experience isn’t typically at the top of the CIO’s priority list but it was certainly front and center in New York this week.

I believe things are about to change for CIOs. In the new era of always-connected consumers – what Forrester calls The Age Of The Customer – customer experience is so critical that I predict it will become the #1 priority for CIOs. In part because unhappy customers have the power to alter the course of any organization, as Netflix CEO Reed Hastings discovered in 2011, when his US customers forced him into an about-turn on his strategy to split movies-by-mail from online streaming.

But investing in customer experience is tricky because it’s often seen as an abstract thing with little tangible ROI. Companies like USAA, a US insurance company with a strategic focus on customer experience, have spent years re-shaping their entire organizations to think from the outside-in, focusing on the end customer. USAA did this because they believed it was the right thing to do, not because of some compelling business case.

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NetSuite Strengthens Its Push Into The Enterprise – Lessons From The SuiteWorld Forum

Tim Sheedy
I recently had the opportunity to spend some quality time with NetSuite in San Jose at its customer forum — SuiteWorld. The event gave me a long, overdue deep-dive into their current strategy and the chance to speak with many of their customers one-on-one. 
 
The big announcement from the event was the availability of its manufacturing solution. The evening before the event started I had a good conversation with our Sourcing Analyst Liz Herbert — who spends a lot of her life focused on the SaaS providers — and asked her why NetSuite was not growing more quickly. Her response was that its lack of a manufacturing solution is partly to blame. So when it was announced by CEO Zach Nelson the next morning, it certainly helped to fill me with confidence about its future.
 
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CX And An Ex-CIO

Nigel Fenwick

This week's Customer Experience Forum was far more than just an event for customer experience (CX) professionals. It was an event for any business leader who truly cares about customers. And this includes many CIOs.

Attendees gather at the 2013 NYC Forrester CX Forum

As far as I'm concerned, the best CX presentation by a guest speaker was given this morning by a former CIO, Paul Heller. Paul is now Managing Director of the Retail Investor Group at Vanguard. While his session was energetic and full of humor, it also conveyed his message about the business of delighting clients very clearly. Paul suggests we all need to get in touch with the why, how and who of our business: 

  • Why are customers doing what they do? To answer this question we really need to get to know the reasons for customers doing business with us. Vanguard took the time to ask their customers why they invest and they discovered people want to have more time to do the things they enjoy, they want less stress and to avoid being bored. Trust me, it's way funnier the way Paul describes it.
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