Apple Extensibility And Powerful Network Effects

Michael Yamnitsky

Apple’s new "Extensibility" feature took somewhat of a backseat to a host of exciting new developer tools announced at Apple’s developer conference a week ago. I’d like to briefly highlight its importance to the enterprise. 

In short, Extensibility makes it easy for apps to talk to each other, facilitating more complex mobile workflows and easy access to data stored in personal cloud services. It will spur app developers work together to speed the advancement of what employees will be able to accomplish on mobile. 

 To elaborate, Extensibility will enable:

  • Complex inter-app workflows for mobile employees. More advanced content creation apps have been slow to develop on mobile platforms, in part due to lack of app interoperability. Think of the multiple software tools we use to pull a contract from email, sign it, and send it back on a PC. Data must similarly flow across a variety of apps to accomplish this on mobile. Apple has done little to address this, until now.
  • Access to the personal cloud in enterprise apps. Employees rely on personal cloud services like Dropbox and Evernote to manage an expanding array of digital content online. But these repositories don’t integrate with the enterprise off the bat. Extensibility can act as a router to connect personal data with the apps your employees use every day on the job. 
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Q&A With Oliver Bussmann, Group Chief Information Officer, Group Managing Director, UBS AG

Sharyn Leaver

In advance of next week’s Forrester’s European Forum For Technology Management Leaders in London (June 12-13), we had an opportunity to speak with Oliver Bussmann, one of our industry keynote speakers, about digital business and how UBS is responding to the challenges of digital disruption and to rising customer expectations.

Oliver Bussmann joined UBS in June 2013 as Group Chief Information Officer (CIO), responsible for the Group Technology organization. As Oliver will explain in his presentation on day 2 of the Forum, digital business transformation success in his view hinges on three key factors: A joint and strong partnership of IT and the business working together; creating a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship; consistent and authentic support of senior leadership to demonstrate by example that this transformation is real, necessary and appreciated.

I hope you enjoy Oliver's responses as much as I did, and do join us on June 12-13 to hear the full story!

Q: What is your agenda as CIO at UBS?  

As CIO my job is to position IT as a business enabler, this involves understanding the firm's strategic priorities, and ensuring we strike the right balance between (1) managing the traditional IT functions to ensure a cost-effective, reliable and secure infrastructure and (2) focusing on strategic IT, driving transformational change through innovation, to increase revenue opportunities and deliver real value to our business.

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Apple's iOS 8 Focuses On Developers Building New Mobile Moments

Ted Schadler

Yesterday in San Francisco, Apple showed once again that it cares about developers. And well it should. With Flurry reporting consumers spending 86% of their smartphone time in apps, not Web sites, the 1.14 million apps in the US App Store are just a drop in the bucket. We expect to see that number swell to 10 million apps by 2020. But that will only happen if Apple and the rest of the mobile industry focus relentlessly on developers.

Apple's goal is winning all the mobile moments. [See our new book, The Mobile Mind Shift, for much more on this important way of looking at the mobile revolution.] Developers are key to reaching that goal. Here are the things that struck me from Apple's announcements yesterday:

  • More tools for developers. A new development language, "4,000" new APIs, a new testbed capability, and access to Touch ID, basic Siri language processing, and look-ahead typing are just the most obvious new capabilities that Apple is offering developers. To build innovative new apps, developers need all the tools and support they can get. These announcements reflect Apple's paced but steady rollout of things developers care about.
  • More access to more sensors, hence context. Though Apple downplayed the healthcare opportunities a bit, it knows that developers need access to all the sensors on the devices in order to build interesting mobile moments in health, fitness, and location-based applications. These applications need to take advantage of all the context of that moment. 
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Digital Business 2014 Infographic

Nigel Fenwick

Following the adage "a picture is worth a thousand words" we produced this infographic to support my keynote speech at the Technology Management Forum in Orlando (and the CMO CIO CX breakfast in Sydney). Feel free to tweet and share the unedited graphic. (Click image to download a higher res PDF; also free to share unedited).

Next post: For CIOs The Journey To Digital Business Begins With The BT Agenda
Previous post: Getting The Right Digital Leadership

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Your Technology Reflects The State Of Your Customer Experience Ecosystem, So Plan Accordingly

TJ Keitt

The business press has come alive over the past few weeks as companies as diverse as Delta, Facebook, and Tesla have publicly declared that they want to own software development for key applications. What should catch your attention about these announcements is the types of software these firms want to control. Delta is acquiring the software IP and data associated with an application that affects 180 of its customer and flight operations systems. Facebook is building proprietary software to simplify interactions between its sales teams and the advertisers posting ads on the social networking site. And Tesla has developed its own enterprise resource management (ERP) and commerce platform that links the manufacturing history of a vehicle with important sales and customer support systems. Tesla's CIO Jay Vijayan, in describing his organization's system, sums up the sentiment behind many of these business decisions: "It helps the company move really fast."

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Reset On Big Data Or Miss The Big Change

Brian  Hopkins

Big data is undergoing big change, but most companies are missing it or just grasping at the edges. My colleague Fatemeh Khatibloo and I have just completed an exhaustive study of the big data phenomenon. We found a familiar pattern: business confusion in the face of stern warnings about the dangers of big data and vendor-sponsored papers extolling its benefits. Here’s what we found hidden beneath the buzz:

As data explodes, so do old ways of doing business.

Everywhere we look, we find businesses using more diverse, messier, and larger data sets to stay competitive in the age of the customer — like the consumer goods firm that allocated marketing dollars based on flu trend predictions and the oil and gas companies that used weather data to predict iceberg flows and extend their drilling season. Savvy businesses find ways to turn more data into a competitive advantage. If your firm doesn’t get this, it won’t be pretty — starting in the not too distant future.

Technology managers and architects can’t afford to sit back and think that their Hadoop project will deliver everything the business needs. Nor can you afford to think that big data isn’t for you because you don’t have that much data. Why? Because “big data” is really the practices and technologies that close the gap between the available data and the ability to turn that data into business insight — insight that your firm needs to survive and thrive in the age of the customer. Four things to understand:

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How Do New “Systems Of Insight” Power Great Mobile Moments And Customer Experiences? -- Launching New Research

Ted Schadler
Customers crave contextual and personal experiences on their mobile devices. Companies are looking to the reams of location and behavior data spun off mobile device to deliver them. Meanwhile, executives long for the insights lurking just below the surface of the new data they collect on customers and prospects to improve services and chart the best business strategy. 
 
In most companies, mobile engagement, customer analytics, innovation, and business strategy happen in silos and often half-heartedly. But disruptors like Uber, TripIt, Netflix, Flipboard, and Starbucks deliver great and personalized mobile and digital experiences -- and optimize outcomes -- with insights derived from all the data they can gather.
 
We believe these disrupters deliver great mobile experiences by building what my colleague Brian Hopkins has termed a “system of insight” that goes far beyond traditional analytics or big data approaches to gather, analyze, and operationalize all the data to deliver great mobile moments. These companies are different – they take a systematic approach to linking mobile data to big data analytics technology, staff, and operations. This lets them take advantage of mobile data to improve customer experiences and their business.
 
Brian and I believe that these firms are building systems of insight by:
  1. Gathering and mining mobile and location data to continually find and harness new customer insights. 
  2. Embedding predictive analytics engines into their engagement platforms to deliver contextual and personalized mobile and digital experiences based on each individual’s unique score and context.
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Tracking A Private Dell

Dane Anderson

Earlier this year, I had the distinct honor of interviewing Michael Dell after his keynote address at an event organized by the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore. It was a nostalgic opportunity as I recalled my macroeconomics professor in college over 20 years ago holding up a copy of Fortune magazine with Michael Dell on the cover.

Throughout my career as an industry analyst, I tracked the global PC giants as they clumsily tried to match Dell’s direct model in the ’90s and saw the company emerge as a multibillion-dollar IT industry juggernaut in the ’00s; most recently, I’ve watched with interest as the company went private. Like Michael (and me), Dell has undoubtedly passed through its youth and is now looking to embark on a new course that can leverage everything it has learned to this point through middle age. Something has indeed been lost, but much has also been gained.

My first and most lasting impression of our discussion was just how respectful and humble Michael is. When he speaks, he looks you in the eye, and when others speak, he listens. He wasn’t looking at his watch or thinking of other things. That said, I was quickly reminded of who I was speaking with when we discussed China. When I shared my views on the challenges facing the country, he perked up and told me that Jiang Zemin (China’s president from 1993 to 2003) told him the same thing at length in English (which is rare) a couple of years ago at an event. What we both said is off the record!

A Big Soft Underbelly

As it turns out, the global IT market is also entering middle age. Another clear takeaway from our discussion was Michael’s view that the global enterprise IT industry has a “big soft underbelly” that is ripe for new efficiencies, cost reductions, and innovations. I think he’s right.

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The Collaborative Economy Will Drive Business Innovation And Growth

Dan Bieler

Over the past two decades, the Internet has triggered a tectonic shift in the concept of networking — one that has redefined how companies market and sell products. More recently, social media, mobile, and cloud have fundamentally changed the concept of collaboration, enabling businesses, employees, customers, and partners to continuously interact with each other to create innovative new products and services and enhance existing ones. Rising customer expectations and faster product life cycles are forcing companies to adapt to a new style of business: “the collaborative economy.” My new report outlines the core dynamics of the collaborative economy and the implications for CIOs and their business partners:

  • Collaboration is much more than unified communications. It’s not sufficient for the CIO to roll out a unified communications solution; technology solutions alone do not change business processes or support employees’ changing collaborative behavior — let alone alter business models. A modern collaboration strategy requires CIOs to make organizational adjustments in addition to technology planning.
  • Collaboration is becoming part of the corporate strategy. A modern collaboration platform is the foundation for better innovation, faster processes, and greater employee satisfaction, which lead to happier customers and new revenue opportunities. We believe that modern collaboration is part of competitive advantage — and leading CIOs must support it as part of their group strategy.
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How InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG) Makes Mobile Guest Moments Great

Ted Schadler
IHG, owner of InterContinental Hotels Group, wants to fully inhabit the mobile moments of its hotel guests in their journey from booking to arriving to staying to departing. Bill Keen is the Director of Mobile Solutions at InterContinental Hotels Group. You can try out his app here. He shared his experiences making mobile a cornerstone of IHG’s customer strategy in this interview at Forrester's recent Technology Management Forum in Orlando, Florida. My take is that three things drive mobile mind shift success at IHG:
 
  1. Bill and his team relentlessly focus on mobile moments that improve the guest experience, from booking in to in-room services.
  2. Bill’s business team works side by side with the business technology team to build apps. Bill describes a special "team chemistry."
  3. The multi-disciplinary team uses a sophisticated agile process to quickly extend things that work and fix things that don’t.
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