Smart Home Activities Will Align With Existing Markets, Rather Than Create A New One

Frank Gillett

Consumers are implementing connected home activities one gadget at a time - Forrester surveys show that about 13% of US online adults use one or more smart home device. But unlike mobile, where a brand new technology established a new category, smart home products will transform existing home markets, such as insurance, energy, health, water, and food, rather than create a new one.

Sure, Apple and Google will battle to be the dominant app interface and software platform – but they won’t be controlling or taking over those markets. Instead, individual companies will soon be experimenting with how to promote and even subsidize smart home products to create interactive relationships with their customers that simply weren’t possible before. Liberty Mutual and American Family just started subsidizing Nest Protect smoke detectors in return for monthly confirmation that the homeowner is keeping them on and connected to Wi-Fi. Similarly, grocers and food brands such as Nestlé and Unilever will begin promoting smart devices, like the Drop baking scale, and recipe filled apps to encourage shoppers to keep coming back.

Emerging smart home devices will perform 13 activities that can be organized into two domains: crucial background activities that automate everyday tasks like environmental comfort, home access, and home safety, or fun and helpful foreground activities that sustain engagement, such as entertainment activities, cooking and health management, and monitoring family members. Clients can see more details and many examples in our report, The Smart Home Finally Blossoms

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Data Digest: Partner With Business Leaders To Lead The Business Technology Transformation

Tyler McDaniel

For CIOs, finding a clear path forward in the Business Technology (BT) Agenda can seem daunting, as you work to balance critical operational requirements with new initiatives designed to help your organization win, serve, and retain customers.  But there are trailblazers in your organization.  Forrester continues to see spending on technology spread and move out of the CIO’s organization and into the business. In North America companies of more than 250 employees, 70% of technology spending is either business led or heavily influenced by business. That part is not new, but it is increasing.

Specifically 50% of business managers, directors, and vice presidents are increasing their departmental budgets on technology products and services over the next 12 months.1  In fact, 16% of these business leaders are increasing their spend by more than 10%.2 This isn’t shadow IT in action; it’s the new way of doing business. Within your own organization a minority, but important, population of business leaders are aggressively investing in technology products and services to achieve three essential business goals. Over the next 12 months, the 16% of North American business leaders dramatically increasing their spending are focused on:

  • Improving customer experience – 86% of these leaders rate this as a High or Critical priority
  • Improving products or services – 83% of these leaders rate this as a High or Critical priority
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Beyond Light: Smart Lighting Illuminates More Than Streets

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Gone are the days when the only signal a streetlight sent out was that it was time to go home on a summer evening.  Many kids grew up with that rule.  My mom had a cowbell, which was infinitely more embarrassing but likely more effective in calling us home. But times have changed. We now text our kids to get them home for dinner.  And, street lights themselves would no longer deign to serve just that purpose. 

Streetlights these days do provide light (and do that much more efficiently), but they just might be your source of Wi-Fi or of information on the weather, air quality, traffic, and parking availability, or might be the city’s source of information on you.  They will also be a platform for new services that leverage all of the data the new light poles collect through their embedded sensors, or also a source of electricity to power digital signs through solar-energy. These new and improved streetlights are becoming increasingly popular as they demonstrate a clear cost-savings over their predecessors and promise the potential for revenue generation through new applications and services.  That is a win-win for cities, citizens and the ecosystem of potential application and service providers out there. 

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Data Today Keeps The Doctor Away

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

In scanning through my O’Reilly Data Newsletter today, I noticed A Healthy Dose of Data, an MIT Sloan case study on the data and analytics culture at Intermountain, a healthcare network that runs 22 hospitals and 185 clinics.  The study is definitely worth the read.  It reviews the history of data use at Intermountain, which began way before the “big data” craze of recent years.  In fact, it was back in the 1950s that one of the Intermountain cardiologists, Homer Warner, began to explore clinical data to understand why some heart patients experienced better outcomes than others.  He went on to become known as the “father of medical informatics – the use of computer programs to analyze patient data to determine treatment protocols,” and with colleagues designed and launched their first decision-support tool. 

The case study goes on to describe how Intermountain has cultivated a strong data and analytics culture. Over time – Rome was not built in a day, as they say – they established data maturity across the organization by investing in the capacity (new tools and technologies), developing the competencies (new skills and processes) and finally spreading the culture (awareness, understanding and best practices) of data and analytics. Their analytical approach brought results – fewer surgical infections, more effective use of antibiotics, less time in intensive care etc – contributing to lower costs, better medical outcomes, and overall patient satisfaction.

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What's Your Perspective On Digital Business?

Nigel Fenwick
We’re launching our quantitative research into digital business for 2015, and I’d like to capture your perspectives in this year’s study.
 
Last year we started a detailed research study into digital business and published numerous reports on our findings and insights for business executives. This year we have partnered with Odgers Berndtson to help field our digital business survey to business executives. And as we did last year, we’re also extending the survey to our clients and social media followers.
 
The survey only takes 10 to 15 minutes to complete … the perfect accompaniment to a cup of coffee or tea! (OK that may be a stretch … but you can easily complete it while enjoying a cuppa.)
 
Please share the link with your social media followers (http://nigel.im/2015digibiz).
 
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The Technology Skills Needed To Deliver In A Customer-Obsessed Organization

Sharyn Leaver

Digital technologies have shifted control into the hands of your customers. Your customers are now independent, active agents in everything, from selecting the channels and platforms they prefer, to the very definition of your brands. As CIO, you’re in an enviable position and are more essential to your firm’s success than ever. You have the technology know-how to tap into these digital technologies. And together with your CMO, you can lead your firm to become customer obsessed and create the digital experiences that win, serve, and retain customers. But you have to be willing to change the way you work.

CIOs of customer obsessed firms must embrace an accelerated pace of change and reinvention, for themselves and their organizations. But years of radical IT outsourcing have denuded many technology management organizations. In fact, Forrester's Q1 2015 Digital Experience Delivery Survey found that the top barrier to success was a lack of resources. So your first order of business as CIO?  Invest heavily in new skills:

  • Software engineering.Software (and how well it does or doesn’t perform) underpins the brand for digital businesses, making core software development and delivery skills paramount to your firm’s future success.  Agile methods, continuous-delivery techniques, and product management skills will be critical – not just in pockets, but scaled up to address all software engineering needs.
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The API Management Solutions Market Will Quadruple By 2020 As Business Goes Digital

Michael Yamnitsky
Often considered the poster child of digital transformation, APIs are proliferating at enterprises making industry-leading investments in mobile, IoT, and big data. As these initiatives mature, CIOs, CTOs, and heads of development are coming together with business leaders to manage and secure companywide use of APIs using API management solutions
 
Forrester recently released a report that sizes and projects annual spending on API management solutions. We predict US companies alone will spend nearly $3 billion on API management over the next five years. Annual spend will quadruple by the end of the decade, from $140 million in 2014 to $660 million in 2020. International sales will take the global market over the billion dollar mark.
 
In interviewing vendors for this piece of research, we discovered a vast and fertile landscape of participants:
Startups have taken $430 million in venture funding, and so far have realized $335 million in acquisition value. In April 2015, pure-play vendor Apigee went IPO and currently trades at a valuation north of $400 million. 
 
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Building A Customer-Obsessed Operating Model

Kyle McNabb

Empowered customers, armed with ever-increasing digital capability, increasingly expect any information, any service, at their moment of need. We call this the age of the customer. Innovative brands, from Delta to Southwest, T-Mobile to Verizon, Home Depot to Walgreens, and Caterpillar to Rolls Royce, are sharing with Forrester how they are disrupting the way they work to meet their empowered customers’ needs, to become customer-obsessed. Becoming customer-obsessed gives you, the CIO, an unprecedented opportunity: to overcome the nagging frustration of IT gravity that suppresses your and your team’s ability to influence the direction of your business, to build new competitive advantage. But you have to be willing to change the way you work.  

You’re in an enviable position and are more essential to your firm’s success than ever. Together with your CMO, you have the best overall knowledge of your customers and the technology know-how to deliver a superior customer experience and drive growth.

We’ve begun to identify how leading firms change their operating models to deliver more value and become truly customer-obsessed. Much of that change falls on the CIO to drive. This research is ongoing, but the actions leaders take to shape their customer-obsessed operating model — focused on customer loyalty, innovation, and most importantly, growth, and fueled by customer insight — are becoming clear:

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Business As Usual Not An Option For Customer-Obsessed CIOs

Steven Peltzman

As Forrester’s own Chief Business Technology Officer, I’m immersed in our strategic view that consumers and businesses alike demand outstanding customer experiences and expect them more than ever before. In fact, it’s so important to us that we are being measured against the Customer Experience Index (CX Index™) on delivering a great customer experience.

The trouble is I’m experiencing many of the same blockers that our client CIOs say they have: the over-customized legacy infrastructure that won’t go away, constrained budgets, and less resources than we wish we had. Sound familiar? Through it all, we’ve made great progress — an improved website, a great iPad app, cloud infrastructure, etc. — and there’s more to come.

That’s all good, but good is not good enough in the age of the customer. With the threat of Digital Disruption all around us, we feel a great urgency to do more and do it quickly.

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The Digital Bolt-On Conundrum

Nigel Fenwick
What’s the difference between a digital bolt-on and transformative digital disruption?
 
In the two years I’ve been on the road talking with executives around the world about digital business and delivering keynotes on digital transformation, I’ve been most frequently asked about bolt-on vs. transformation; what’s the difference? 
 
A digital bolt-on is a digital project that is added to the existing business model that might improve the customer experience in a small way, but doesn’t fundamentally change how value is created for, and/or delivered to, the customer. For example, when a company updates a website and provides customers an electronic ordering platform, they are not changing the existing business model; they are simply providing an alternative channel through which the customer can buy products. The value proposition remains the same: buy and experience our product and you’ll gain value from the experience. Digital (in this case an online sales channel) has been bolted to the existing business model in much the same way a teenager bolts a spoiler onto an old car to make it "go faster".
 
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