Goodbye BlackBerry

Adieu Blackberry_0138 If you're the typical CEO, you are carrying a BlackBerry. But not for long. Once the iPhone is able, in a corporate setting, to replicate all aspects of Outlook (email, calendar, notes, and tasks) with high security, the iPhone floodgates will open and you will have a new device. Here's why:

1) User interface. Despite the annoyance of the glass keyboard, the iPhone interface is faster, more intuitive, more flexible, and more versatile. You can do more, with more content, less instruction, and faster speed.

2) Applications. iPhone has a massive head start in the battle for applications. It's possible that your company already has an iPhone application in the market -- servicing your customers. Don't you wish you could see it? And there may already be applications available that will make your job easier -- I predict that corporate dashboards for CEOs will be a small but influential segment of the iPhone apps portfolio. In some markets, it's changing how customers connect to companies -- here's an example around mobile banking. The application revolution has begun -- and it's not on BlackBerry.

3) iPhone will soon be available from more cell services providers -- starting first in Europe. Once the device breaks out of its AT&T cage, the multiplier effect will kick in -- and the flood waters will rise fast.

Now there's a big "if" in all of this. Apple has been hostile to large corporate environments for years. Steve Jobs has famously called your CIO an "orifice" as in, "...we've never been good at going through the orifices to get to end users." Every time the company tries to leave the consumer and go enterprise, it goes from being cool to being incompetent. The company hates to take direction from anyone  -- especially from large company CIOs.

But Apple may have to bend its corporate culture to grab the enterprise iPhone business -- the opportunity of moving iPhones into large companies will be too big and too lucrative to ignore. Once your company supports full Outlook replication to iPhones, many of your employees will dump their Blackberries -- and your CIO will begin looking at how she can build some game-changing corporate applications for the Apple device.

After many years of watching tech revolutions unfold, I know that winners control two factors: 1) they effect a quantum jump in man/machine interface, and 2) they win massive applications support. Check and check with the iPhone. If Apple consents to change its strategy, an iPhone will be coming your way.

Comments

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

yea this is abstly right, iphones will capture the markets soon. One of the reasons I believe is the availability of huge resources for iphone Apps (developers and their curiosity to develop somethin for TOuch screens and iphone is a wonderful way to start) which can leverage the corporates work in alot of customized way!!One hurdle can be one man show in Apple,I believe.As said the culture of Apple to go to enterprise needs to fairly changed and the corporate world will see a new rise of communication and interaction.Recently my company also started with iphone app development and learnt the facts as stated in the blog!!

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

Really?I personally have no mobile device preference, but after reading this I'm wondering from where the motivation for this enthusiastic prediction comes.1. The keyboard on the iPhone can't be 'felt', and so there's a fairly steep acculturation curve that many people never overcome.2. Do CEO's really care deeply about adding all sorts of apps? There's a certain schoolgirl-like giddiness here that I just don't see supported by any data or even anecdotal evidence. Even the banking example you cite relates to ALL mobile devices, not just iPhones.3. None of this happens in a vacuum - will Blackberry (or Pre, or whomever) cease to innovate their devices, software interfaces, capabilities?4. Apple's man/machine interfaces have been superior for quite some time now...where's their desktop/laptop dominance?I've got no dog in this hunt, in fact I happily own some Apple products, but call me skeptical.

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

Steve:Apple failed in desktop/laptop dominance because they didn't get the applications support -- you need both interface and apps to dominate.Try a little test. The next person you meet with a Blackberry, ask them a question: "Hey, if the iPhone had all of the email/task/notes/calendaring/security of the Blackberry, would you switch?" The answer might give you a clue about the future...

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

We don't have to wonder about enterprise support -- we have plenty of data to support it. Enterprise support for iPhone has grown to 17% of enterprises in Q2 2009 (up from zero less than two years previously).BlackBerry has 74% of enterprises (and the vast bulk of the market int he US and Europe anyway), and Windows Mobile has support from 40% of enterprises.Check out this report: [subscription required]Technology Populism Fuels Mobile Collaborationhttp://www.forrester.com/Research/Document/0,7211,54773,00.htmlAlmost every CIO, EA, or CISO conversation I have these days includes a "tell me how to support iPhone because I know I have to" section. It's about people wanting the device, the quality of the Internet browser, and the rising tide of apps.Doesn't mean BlackBerry or Windows Mobile goes away; it just means that the competition got a whole lot more interesting. All will benefit as smartphones move from 11% of information workers (in the US today) to more like . . . all of them!

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

Here's my take (caveat: I don't write about these issues actively, so this is just armchair quarterbacking from another Forrester analyst's point of view).* RIM isn't dead -- but Windows Mobile is. WinMo is being squeezed on the business side by RIM (who has become the ultimate business tool by virtue of utility-grade mobile e-mail), and on the lifestyle side by Apple. They'll never be perceived as being as good at e-mail as RIM, and they will never be as cool as Apple.* Microsoft's mistake is that it thinks that mobile phones are really just little PCs -- commodity products where features aren't as important as price, and where distribution rules. Microsoft might well have 50 licensees for WinMo, but who cares? All of the phones are crap. No phone needs a "Start" menu. Apple, by contrast, knows that phones are jewelry, at least to consumers. And they control the whole stack, without any dilution in the user experience. RIM knows this too.* The one area where RIM is weak is in its application strategy. RIM apps are all Java apps, and no matter what kind of Java-optimizing hardware they put in their phones they will never run as smoothly and fluidly as a native app can. So they will suffer by comparison with Apple or the Pre. Also, while Java tools are decent in general, they aren't that great for mobile devices, and they can't touch Apple's Xcode environment for iPhone development.In short, I don't see RIM dying. I see them vacuuming up Microsoft's share, and Palm's after the Pre flames out. Their share will probably flatline at some point, but the pie will be a lot bigger. So they will do fine.

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

All I see here is another iPhone fanboy. Apple created a fad, that's all. The iPhone craze will die down in a while when someone else comes out with the next big thing. How much is Apple paying you to bash RIM's Blackberry?

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

sir, BlackBerry has CAP B in second B?you speel iPHone with a CAP P, why not follow correct spelling for BlackBerry? SMILEit's Jon Stewart, not John Stewart, right?So why treat BlackBerry this way?SEEhttp://zippy1300.blogspot.com/2009/08/does-stowe-boyd-agree-that-we-need-new.html

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

AND George, while i got you hear, do YOU Think we need a new word for READING on screens, and do you like the word SCREENING that I am using now?sir, BlackBerry has CAP B in second B?you speel iPHone with a CAP P, why not follow correct spelling for BlackBerry? SMILEit's Jon Stewart, not John Stewart, right?So why treat BlackBerry this way?SEEhttp://zippy1300.blogspot.com/2009/08/does-george-colony-agree-that-we-need-new.html

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

http://zippy1300.blogspot.com/2009/08/does-george-f-colony-agree-that-we-need.htmlGeorge, may I ask you this question above on my blog? Email at danbloom gmailyou might not think this is important but it IS!also, look at BlackBerry photo on your blog post above, look at the logo, is there a CAP B for second B or not? So why lowercase it the second time? We don't write iphone or Iphone, we write iPhone. So follow the rules, sir. SMILEdanny in Taiwanhttp://zippy1300.blogspot.com/2009/08/does-george-f-colony-agree-that-we-need.html

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

No way, no how. At least not as long as the iPhone's security is below standard. Corporations hang onto BB's because of the email and security. Also, iPhones need a physical keyboard to get serious about taking over the business side of things.

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

I agree with the articles points, however as many commenters indicate its more probable that the iPhone will add to the but mix not replace the Blackberry.The prediction about Exec Dashboards is very likely. It's a great mobile use case that makes you more productive.. like email. Plus it is very easy to use existing reporting tools like Xcelcius and Hyperion to build dashboards that can fit the iPhone screen, however there are limitations with lack of Flash and Java support to run native. That's another reason why more companies are running their apps on Citrix XenApp and remoting the UI to the iPhone. This also fixes many of the intrinsic security concerns about security and control. For some examples of Apps and Dashboards that look native but can be delivered to any mobile device from the same infrastructure under IT control check out:http://fleck.com/BJJFc

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

Maybe. I've found it interesting seeing people going back to Blackberry after trying the iPhone. For corporate types, it is the lack of support. But some of my daughter's high-school friends have switched back because iPhones are so crummy for IMing.

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

Goodbye to Blackberry? I doubt it. The IT department loves them and they still have the most secure and device management friendly approach for IT departments. Also, power users love them - the keyboard and the fact you can drop it and it does not stop working.Hello to LOTS of different devices in the enterprise? Absolutely. The real story is diversity and lots of it as people rally around the device of their choice.Hype about “the death of ” is a familiar refrain. They won’t fade away; in fact the real nightmare for the CIO is they all will continue live. The iPhone just made the CIO have one more device to support and there will others - android devices, Pre's and...more Blackberry’s too.

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

George, did you ever consider that maybe the 'orifices' are the problem???

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

Max:If you're dealing with large enterprises, you're always going to find "orifices", be they sourcing professionals, chief legal counsels, or CIOs -- it's simply the nature and structure of the beast. Have you ever tried to do a business deal with so-called enlightened companies like Apple or Google? We're talking orifices with a capital "O".

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

As a longtime Blackberry user, I am personally blown away by the IPhone. I have always suspected that the Blackberry was invented by a Thirtysomething person with keen eyesight and tiny fingers. Besides being easy to read and use the IPhone apps are phenomenal. I noticed some reader criticism here of apps and whether or not CEOs need them. Well, all I can say is if you need to level a picture frame or start your swimming pool's filtration system from the road, the IPhone is your man.Ron

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

I work in a fortune 10 company and our executives (IT and otherwise) either have a BlackBerry or an iPhone. Half the BB users wish they had an iPhone. Zero of iPhone user wish they had a BB.It's simple. They fly first class and see other's watching movies (they know how to use Handbrake), show family pics, playing cool apps... and using business apps.I don't have my head in the sand. The BB is an e-mail monster. That's what the remaining users want, and it's not going away. WinMo on the other hand is dead. So much for first mover advantage ... though they didn't really move first to mobile computing... just shoved Windows on a phone.

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

I believe Good Technology has recently expanded their management platform to support iPhones. In light of thisd post it will be interesting to see the tractiobn their solution gets within the enterprise.

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

re: Goodbye BlackBerry

This is about blackberry