The Mobile Mind Shift Is Transforming The Rules Of Customer Engagement

Katyayan Gupta

Mobile is drastically changing consumers’ behaviors and expectations. Forrester calls this phenomenon the mobile mind shift: the expectation that I can get what I want in my immediate context and moments of need. While the mobile mind shift is global in nature, it’s most profound here in Asia Pacific (AP): By 2020, 4.3 billion people globally will have a mobile subscription and more than half of them will be in AP. Organizations must take advantage of this and catapult their business to new heights — or risk becoming irrelevant in the eyes of these technology-empowered customers.

Forrester has developed a framework to help eBusiness and channel strategy professionals prepare their organizations for the mobile mind shift that we call the IDEA framework. This is a systematic approach to developing mobile experiences for customers relevant to their context and entails:

  1. (I)dentifying mobile moments and their context. A mobile moment is any time a person pulls out a mobile device to get what s/he wants immediately, in context. To understand your customers’ mobile moments, identify their needs, motivations, and context. Forrester recommends using customer journey maps for this step.
  2. (D)esigning the mobile engagement. Use these results as an input when designing the mobile engagement. The design should match your business objectives and your customer’s motivation in each moment. The key is to incorporate contextual information into the design language of the app so that it is easy for your customers to interact with you in their mobile moments.
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Five Axioms For Application Development In 2012

Mike Gualtieri

Software Is Not Code; It Creates Experiences

Ultimately, customers don't judge you based on how well you gather business requirements, choose development technologies, manage projects, or march through the development process — they judge you based on how they feel before, during, and after they use your software. This is the digital experience. If you get the customer experience wrong, then nothing else matters. And expectation inflation is sky-high thanks to the Apple-led smartphone revolution. To succeed in the new age of digital experience, application development professionals must collaborate with their business partners and customers to create experiences that customers love. You need a new approach represented by these five axioms:

  1. Software is not code; it creates experience.
  2. Development teams are not coders; they are experience creators.
  3. Technical talent is table stakes; great developers must be design and domain experts.
  4. Process is bankrupt without design; you get what you design, so you had better get the design right.
  5. Software is a creative endeavor, not an industrial process like building automobiles. Structure your methodology to empower your creative talent.

Doable? Definitely. Forrester clients can read the full report to learn how: Digital Experience Strategy: Follow These Three Mega Rules To Beat The Competition In 2012.

Forrester's Mobile App Design Context: Location, Locomotion, Immediacy, Intimacy, And Device

Mike Gualtieri

They say "content is king." But, "context is kingier" when it comes to designing great smartphone and tablet mobile apps. Don't make the mistake of thinking that mobile app design is just about a smaller screen size or choosing the right development technology. Content and context are both important to designing great user experiences, but mobile amplifies context on five critical dimensions: location, locomotion, immediacy, intimacy, and device. Understand each dimension of Forrester's mobile context to design mobile apps that will make your users say "I love this app!"

Forrester LLIID: Location, Locomotion, Immediacy, Intimacy, And Device

  • Location. People use apps in an unlimited number of locations. And not all places are the same. A user may be in a quiet movie theater, at home in the kitchen, on a train, or in the White Mountain National Forest. Contrast this with desktop computers, stuck in places such as an office cubicle, home office, or kitchen. Laptops provide some mobility but are larger and less able to provide the immediate access of instant-on mobile devices such as smartphones, eReaders, and tablets. Location is a key dimension of context, driving different needs for users depending on where they are. Fortunately, GPS-equipped smartphones can use a geodatabase such as Google Maps to determine precise location.
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Natural user interfaces - notes from the field

Jeffrey Hammond

Last week I was once again hustling through a brutal travel week (10,000 miles in the air and two packed red-eyes) when I came across something really interesting. It was ~ 9 AM and I'd just gotten off AA flight 4389 from Toronto. I was a bit bleary eyed from a 4 AM call with a Finnish customer and was just trying to schlep my way to the Admiral's club for a cup of coffee when I stumbled across Accenture's Interactive Network display at the juncture of terminal H and K.

 

THis is a picture of a screen for the Accenture Interactive Network, at American's terminal at O'Hare

 

So what? You might ask, it's just a big screen and we already know our future is minority report -right? Yes - those of us in the echo chamber might know that, but what really struck me was watching my fellow travelers and how they interacted with the display. I sat and watched for about 10 minutes (while forgetting about the sorely needed cuppa joe) and just watched people as they started to walk past, then pause, then go up to the screen and start playing with it. On average folks would stay for a few minutes and read some of the latest news feeds, then hurry on to their next stop. But what I really found intriguing was how they interacted with the system:

 

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