A Ray of Hope for HP NonStop Users – HP Announces x86 NonStop Plans

Richard Fichera

Lost in the excess of press and collective angst over the fate of HP’s HP-UX servers and the widely-accepted premise that Itanium is nearing the end of its less than stellar run has been the fate of HP’s NonStop users. These customers, some dating back to the original Tandem customer roster, almost universally use HP NonStop systems as mission-critical hubs for their business in industries as diverse as securities trading, public safety and retail sales. NonStop is far more difficult to engineer out of an organization than is HP-UX since there are few viable alternatives at any reasonable cost to replace the combination of scalable processing power and fault-tolerance that the NonStop environment provides.

NonStop users can now breathe collective sigh of relief - on November 4 HP announced that it was undertaking to migrate NonStop to an x86 system platform. Despite the lack of any specifics on system details, timing or pretty much anything else, I think that NonStop users can take this to the bank, figuratively and literally, for a couple of reasons:

  • HP has a pretty good track record of actually delivering major initiatives that it commits to. Their major stumbles in dealing with their Itanium-based HP-UX program has been in not communicating rather than missing commitments. Technically, given another cycle of server CPUs and their collective expertise in systems design, including the already undeway high-end x86 systems programs, there is little doubt that HP can deliver a platform suitable for supporting NonStop.
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IaaS Supply Is Beginning To Create Increased Demand - It's Time To Enable and Manage IaaS Access To Inspire Innovation

Michael Barnes

I recently wrote about the need for IT organizations to embrace SaaS to maintain relevance and help drive business value. This quarter, I’ve set my sights on IaaS. In my forthcoming report, “IaaS Adoption Trends In Asia Pacific”, I explain in detail why my advice remains the same.

Internal IT resistance to expanding IaaS usage based on security, data management, and availability/performance concerns are certainly valid. But project-driven, opportunistic IaaS usage will continue to grow across the region as business decision-makers rationally seek out public cloud-based services that meet needs not met by internal IT.

IT decision-makers failing to consider all service-provisioning options will see their credibility wane and their control usurped by the inevitable emergence of shadow IT, driven by clear business demand. On the positive side, as usage expands internally, I’ve already seen Asia Pacific organizations begin viewing IaaS as a mechanism to fuel innovation based on easy access to cloud-based compute resources. Put another way, IaaS supply is beginning to fuel increased demand.

Some key recommendations for encouraging IaaS-related innovation while minimizing risks:

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