Digital Transformation Europe Forum 2016: Q&A With Fergus Boyd, VP, Digital And IT, Yotel

Laura Koetzle

This week, Forrester’s European Digital Transformation Europe Forum 2016 kicks off in London at the Lancaster on June 8-9. Myself and Forum co-host Benjamin Ensor are very excited about the program that we have been able to put together across the two days. Our list of industry speakers is impressive, and includes Blake Cahill, Global Head of Digital and Social Marketing, at Philips, Toby Wright, Chief Technology Officer, at Telegraph Media Group, Nina Jones, Global Owner Experience Director, at Jaguar Landrover, and Dr. Horst J. Kayser, Chief Strategy Officer, at Siemens AG.

On day one, we will also be hearing from Fergus Boyd, Vice President, Digital and IT at Yotel. Fergus is responsible for this start-up affordable luxury hotel brand’s digital strategy and services (web, mobile, social), IT innovation, and all back-end and guest-facing technology. He is a serial digital entrepreneur and technology transformation agent and led award-winning IT, eCommerce, and innovation initiatives at Virgin Atlantic and British Airways (BA).  

In the run-up to the Forum, we asked Fergus to answer a number of questions on how Yotel uses digital to differentiate itself in the hospitality and accommodation market. His answers are a must-read for other tech management and digital business leaders facing similar challenges. I look forward to hearing Fergus’ presentation, “From Raw Fish To Moving Beds,” this Wednesday. Come and join us by registering today!

Q. How does Yotel use digital (web, mobile, social) to differentiate itself as a startup hotel brand?

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Lost in Service Catalog Taxonomy? Forrester’s Technology Management Service Catalog Taxonomy To The Rescue!

Eveline Oehrlich
When it comes to your Technology Management service catalog, are you lost in arguments on what to call certain categories of services? What are your service families and what is the next level of service elements?  What are the definitions of the service elements? These questions are just the tip of the iceberg of current projects within I&O organizations in defining the rich and complex world of a technology management service catalogs. I&O teams are struggling to architect foundational service catalogs which will support the standardization and optimization efforts of their service offerings. 
 
With that challenge in mind, Forrester created a I&O Technology Management Service Taxonomy - a collection of many service elements, organized by 13 service families. The research consists of a detailed spreadsheet based tool with a variety of service families, service taxonomies and definitions.  The next steps are to understand the business services and capabilities which are enabled through these technology management services.  Some business services and capabilities are similar from one vertical to another.  Our next endeavor is to capture these services as well.  
 
We'd like to make this a living and breathing Service Catalog Taxonomy and plan to publish updates soon. Please send all comments and suggestions to eoehrlich@forrester.com and cgallacher@forrester.com.

Your Opportunity in the Age of the Customer

The age of the customer is a 20-year business cycle in which the most successful companies will reinvent themselves to systematically understand and serve increasingly powerful customers. Re-engineering your company to become customer-obsessed will be hard work, but savvy C-level executives I’ve been speaking with about this tectonic shift immediately grasp the opportunity. 

I spoke about the age of the customer today at LeWeb Paris (you can see the video here, and my slides here) where I focused on one early element of customer empowerment - the mobile mind shift. Your customers expect any information or service they desire be available to them on any device, in context, at their moment of need. Forrester’s global Mobile Mind Shift Index measures how far along a group of consumers are in this change in attitude and behavior.

To serve these customers, you will have to move from systems of record to systems of engagement. Apps are just a small part of that equation. Instead, we’re talking about re-engineering your entire company to deliver great digital experiences. Your brands will compete against Google, Microsoft, Oracle, and Amazon for setting the bar for great customer experiences. What It Means: In the future, every company will be a software company. Software is the new business currency more important than financial capital.

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