Introducing The Forrester Wave™: Digital Risk Monitoring, Q3 2016

Nick Hayes

We recently published our Forrester Wave™: Digital Risk Monitoring, Q3 2016 report. We evaluate nine of the top vendors in this emerging market that offer solutions to continuously monitor “digital” -- i.e., social, mobile, web, and dark web -- channels to detect, prevent, and mitigate any type of risk event posing a threat to organizations today.

 

Why now

It’s almost 2017 and yet companies are more exposed and less equipped to handle the slew of risks that run rampant across countless digital channels today. Digital risk monitoring (DRM) solutions are increasingly valuable for organizations because:

  • Digital channels are now ground zero for cyber, brand, and even physical attacks. Cybercriminals use a variety of tactics to weaponize social media, impersonate or embed malware into mobile apps, deface websites, collude in dark channels, and cause financial, reputational, or physical harm. Digital risk monitoring tools combat these methods by deploying a variety of data-gathering and advanced risk analysis techniques. They aggregate data via open-source intelligence (OSINT), technical intelligence (TECHINT), human intelligence (HUMINT), and even covert human intelligence (CHIS). Then they analyze the collected data with data classifiers, machine learning, and risk scoring algorithms to determine the most likely and most threatening risk events in a quick and efficient manner.
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Avoid The Social Media Binary

Nick Hayes

Many organizations today get caught up in what I call the “social media binary, where there are only two options to social media control: 1) Allow unrestricted access to social networks, and potentially expose the company to myriad security, regulatory, reputational, and other risks, or 2) set and enforce policy that completely forbids the use of social media while at work, and forgo potentially lucrative business opportunities for the firm.

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Help Us Benchmark “Social Maturity”

Stephanie Balaouras

We recently embarked on a Forrester-wide research project to benchmark the use of social technologies across enterprise organizations. Why is this important? Well as you may know, we cover social technologies from a wide range of perspectives — from roles in marketing to IT to technology professionals. We find each of these roles differ in their general “social maturity” and that most companies are experiencing pockets of success, but few, if any, are successfully implementing it across the board. In fact, full maturity in this space could take years, but there are clear differences in how some “ahead of the curve” companies are using social technologies for business results.

There are serious security and risk concerns with social technology but there are also significant business and operational benefits. Security professionals have to determine how they can mitigate these risks to an acceptable level without significantly hampering the business. If you haven’t seen it, Chenxi Wang has written an excellent report on how effective management of social media can alleviate security risks. Check out To Facebook Or Not To Facebook.

There is also some discussion about how security professionals might use social technologies to their own benefit — particularly to leverage the knowledge of other security professionals to combat the growing sophistication of security attacks. If you haven’t seen it, check out John Kindervag’s report SOC 2.0: Virtualizing Security Operations.

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