The Data Digest: Introducing Forrester’s Consumer Healthcare Segmentation

Gina Fleming

The age of the customer coupled with the onset of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. "Obamacare") means that many new customers will enter the US health insurance market. One outcome of the legislation is an opportunity for health insurance marketers to acquire new customers and engage existing customers — and Forrester wants to help them seize this moment. As such, we have created a consumer healthcare segmentation to identify unique groups of US consumers as well as their healthcare needs and attitudes to help health insurance marketers target new customers, engage existing customers, and innovate exciting healthcare tools and programs.

Our report, “Introducing Forrester’s Consumer Healthcare Segmentation,” explains each segment and how to attract or engage them. The segmentation includes both insured and uninsured consumers, representing the entire US online adult population. The graphic below shows each of the segments and their relative size.

Some highlights from the report, which is based on a survey of more than 4,500 US online consumers:

  • Fitness Trackers are young and love to use wearable devices; in fact, everyone in this segment uses one. The majority agree that that their health and wellness are priorities for them and they try to eat a healthy diet, but close to half believe that they are so healthy that they don’t need health insurance.
Read more

The Data Digest: Global Brand, Local Strategy: Forrester's Global Retail Segmentation Helps To Hone Your Regional Approach

Anjali Lai

Coffee-lovers just about anywhere around the world are intimately familiar with the sweet feeling of indulging in a Starbucks Frappuccino – but their blended beverages of choice might be starkly unique. Although the Starbucks brand is familiar to consumers worldwide, the taste of a Starbucks beverage varies regionally according to the diversity of palates. Chinese consumers may seek out a Red Bean Green Tea Frappuccino while their Japanese counterparts prefer a Coffee Jelly; Argentinians may count on that Dulce de Leche Granizado Frappucino where Brits treat themselves to a classic Strawberries and Cream.

The Starbucks Frappuccino phenomenon is a metaphor for any global retailer’s optimal international approach. By catering to consumers’ varying tastes, global companies can hone a strategy that is sensitive to diversity — the “art of thinking independently together,” in the words of Malcolm Forbes.

When it comes to eCommerce specifically, consumer tastes differ not only in relation to products but also to purchase methods. According to Forrester’s Consumer Technographics® data, more than half of metropolitan Chinese online adults regularly buy products through both traditional and mobile devices, but only one in four US online adults and even fewer European consumers do this.

 

Read more

Use Forrester's European Retail Segmentation to Understand Complex Customer Behavior

Martin Gill

Digital disruption is both an opportunity and a threat.

 

In the age of the customer, firms that assume that what made them successful in the past will continue to drive competitive advantage in the future are doomed to failure. But as a counterpoint, those firms that embrace the opportunity digital technologies bring to get closer to their customers by creating contextually relevant, personalized customer experiences will thrive. That’s the theory, but what does it look like in practice?

 

This week, two major UK grocery firms paint opposite ends of the digital spectrum.

 

Read more

Understanding The People Of Walmart — And Getting The Most Out Of Your Surveys

Gina Fleming

Last week, I ran into an infographic on Ad Age about The People of Walmart. It compares the demographics of Walmart, Kmart, Kohl’s, and Target shoppers: for example, age, sex, income, and region of the customers. It shows that more women than men shop at Walmart, and that their audience is quite equally spread across age as well as income. Recently, Forrester conducted a survey where we gained insights on customers of retailers like Walmart. We found that while it’s great to examine the demographics of shoppers, it’s much more powerful (and actionable) to look at other insights about these retailers’ customer base, like marketing preferences, spend levels, and brand consideration.

Below you'll find some of the results from this Forrester study. You'll see that the average US online adult who shops at Walmart spent about $848 on average in the past year, but that only about half are likely to recommend the retail giant to a friend or family member. When these results are compared to other retailers, and by demographic, you create real insights.

I’d love to hear from you: How do you target your customers? Are there any behavioral and attitudinal variables that have been very helpful in defining your target segments?

The Data Digest: Introducing the Splinternet Engagement Index

Reineke Reitsma

My colleague Josh Bernoff recently published a report called 'The Splinternet Engagement Index." The idea behind this index is that it's getting harder and harder for companies to keep up with the pace of technology developments. Your customers now live in the splinternet — the fragmented world of web, social, video, and mobile touchpoints. Consumers want to reach you across all these touchpoints, but you can't afford to be everywhere.

The Splinternet Engagement Index is a single tool that measures customers' engagement with each of the four touchpoints and identifies how likely a group of customers is to demand connections across multiple touchpoints. First, the index measures consumer engagement with each touchpoint (based on a list of eight activities per touchpoint); it then scores the cross-touchpoint engagement.

Read more

Mobile Research Needs Nonmobile Insights

Gina Fleming

With mobile usage becoming increasingly widespread and companies testing the water with mobile strategies, market insights professionals need to uncover consumers’ mobile behavior today and tomorrow. But with the pace of mobile innovation moving so rapidly, how can you keep up with all of the things that people are doing with their mobile phones?

In the next three years, would you expect people to use their mobile phones as wallets? What about as electronic passports? What about for space exploration? While that seems like a long shot, a New York state resident did just that — attaching an iPhone to a weather balloon, videoing the journey, and using its GPS feature to map its voyage (see link for the footage).

Read more