Search Can Build The Foundation For Cognitive Experiences In The Enterprise

Rowan Curran

Knowledge is power. And in a time where insights drive business differentiation, knowledge is also the origin of power. In our daily routines as consumers, search is probably the most common application we use to find knowledge, and it forms the basis of our personal systems of insight. But at long last, search in the enterprise is catching up. A new wave of search-based applications and search-driven experiences are now being delivered by companies who understand the need to empower their employees and customers with immediate, contextual knowledge in an easily-consumable format.

These applications are not for mere search and results, but also for knowledge discovery. And increasingly, they are a foundational component of cognitive application experiences. Building cognitive experiences can seem arcane and mysterious, but by taking advantage of familiar search technologies at the foundation, enterprise developers can start on the cognitive journey.

In our new research, Mike Gualtieri and I look at how the emerging landscape of cognitive search experiences are incorporating advanced analytics, natural language processing (NLP), and machine learning to enable organizations to see across wide arrays of enterprise data and stitch together insights hidden among them.

Cognitive Search Is Ready To Rev Up Your Enterprise's IQ

Semantic Technology Is Not Only For Data Geeks

Michele Goetz

You can't bring up semantics without someone inserting an apology for the geekiness of the discussion. If you're a data person like me, geek away! But for everyone else, it's a topic best left alone. Well, like every geek, the semantic geeks now have their day — and may just rule the data world.

It begins with a seemingly innocent set of questions:

"Is there a better way to master my data?"

"Is there a better way to understand the data I have?"

"Is there a better way to bring data and content together?"

"Is there a better way to personalize data and insight to be relevant?"

Semantics discussions today are born out of the data chaos that our traditional data management and governance capabilities are struggling under. They're born out of the fact that even with the best big data technology and analytics being adopted, business stakeholder satisfaction with analytics has decreased by 21% from 2014 to 2015, according to Forrester's Global Business Technographics® Data And Analytics Survey, 2015. Innovative data architects and vendors realize that semantics is the key to bringing context and meaning to our information so we can extract those much-needed business insights, at scale, and more importantly, personalized. 

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Banks: Add Search To Your Secure Sites

Peter Wannemacher

The majority of bank customers are now active online bankers, making the content and functionality offered on secure sites more important than ever. Forrester has just published research on which features are must-have on banks’ secure websites.

For my money, the most surprising high-value secure website feature is search (here we mean natural language keyword search that lets a user find what he or she is looking for on the site). In fact, our research revealed search to be one of the few bank website features that customers rate as above-average in importance, yet search is either nonexistent or poor on most banks’ secure sites. So we wrote an entire research report about it. Here are some highlights:

  • Online banking customers want search… We asked consumers who bank online to "rate how important it is to you that your bank's website has each of the following features" and asked them about 14 different features, including search. The majority of online bankers — 68% in the US and 63% in Canada — say search is important to have on their bank's secure website.
  • …but few banks offer search on their secure website…Just seven of the 25 largest banks in North America include search functionality on their secure websites.
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What Is Autonomy, Without Its Marketing?

Leslie Owens

Yesterday, HP agreed to buy UK software firm Autonomy Corp. for $10 billion to move into the enterprise information management (EIM) software business. HP wants to add IP to its portfolio, build next-generation information platforms, and create a vehicle for services. It is following IBM’s strategy of acquiring software to sell to accompany its hardware and services. With Autonomy under its wing, HP plans to help enterprises with a big, complicated problem – how to manage unstructured information for competitive advantage. Here’s the wrinkle – Autonomy hasn’t solved that problem. In fact, it’s not a pure technology problem because content is so different than data. It’s a people, process problem, too.

Here is the Autonomy overview that HP gave investors yesterday:

Autonomy architecture

Of course, this diagram doesn’t look like the heterogeneous environment of a typical multinational enterprise. Autonomy has acquired many companies to fill in the boxes here, but the reality is that companies have products from a smorgasbord of content management vendors but no incentive to stick with any one of them.

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Interactive Marketing Spend Will Near $77 Billion By 2016

Shar VanBoskirk

By 2016, advertisers will spend $77 billion on interactive marketing – as much as they do on television today.  Search marketing, display advertising, mobile marketing, email marketing, and social media will grow to 26% 35% of all advertising spend within the next five years.**

What does this growth mean for you?

1)      Interactive media has gained legitimacy in the marketing mix. In past forecasts, we found that interactive budgets grew because of marketing experiments, or firms looking for lower-cost alternatives to traditional media. No more. The next five years of growth comes from bigger interactive teams spending sizably to bake emerging media into their strategies for creating rich customer relationships.

2)      Search’s share will shrink. Search marketing (paid search and SEO) will continue to own the largest portion of the interactive marketing pie. But its overall share will decline as marketers shift search spend into biddable display investments, mobile marketing, and even social media.

3)      Display media will rally. Bolstered by advances in audience targeting and bid-based buying approaches, advertisers will renew their love affair with display media. We expect display investments to grow as marketers apply display instead of search. And niche or remnant inventory sells for higher prices due to demand-driven pricing.

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The Emergence Of CXM Solutions, And Why The Term “WCM” Lives On

Stephen Powers

There has been a great deal of talk over the past few years about what acronym will replace WCM (web content management). Web experience management? Web site management? Web engagement management? Web experience optimization? The list goes on and on.

Certainly, the evolution of the WCM term makes sense on paper, since traditional content management functionality now only makes up a portion of the products that WCM vendors now offer. WCM vendors are also in the content delivery/engagement business, and are even dipping their toes into web intelligence. However, Forrester clients still overwhelmingly ask about “WCM” and that term isn’t going away any time soon.

But even without changing the acronym, it is time to start thinking about WCM beyond just managing content or siloed websites or experiences. Instead, we need to think of how WCM will interact and integrate with other solutions – like search, recommendations, eCommerce, and analytics – in the customer experience management (CXM) ecosystem in order to enable businesses to manage experiences across customer touchpoints.

How are we handling this convergence at Forrester? Several of us who cover various CXM products – like Brian Walker (commerce), Bill Band (CRM), Joe Stanhope (web analytics), and myself (WCM) – teamed up to outline what our vision of CXM looks like, including process-based tools, delivery platforms, and customer intelligence. We've created two versions of the report: one written for Content & Collaboration professionals and one for eBusiness & Channel Strategy professionals.

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Bing/News Corp: Not a Game Changer

How Industries Spend On Interactive Marketing

Shar VanBoskirk

Sharvanboskirk [Posted by Shar VanBoskirk]

I dedicate this blog post to anyone who has read Forrester's interactive marketing forecast and thought, "well that's great, but how are interactive marketers in *my* industry spending on interactive tools." I've just published the US Interactive Marketing Forecast By Industry, 2009 to 2014 which splices our interactive marketing forecast by 12 different industries including:

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Marketers Struggle For Interactive Support

Shar VanBoskirk

Sharvanboskirk [Posted by Shar VanBoskirk]

I'm just back from Dallas where I was part of the iProspect/Range Online client summit -- a one day event of mostly client stories (from a high profile list of marketers) about their successes and woes this year. Overall, I found the event provided a great pulse on present interactive marketer challenges.  But it was less rife with answers or solutions to these challenges.  Maybe that was by design as the

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Yahoo! Takes Baby Steps Toward Much Needed Search Improvement

Shar VanBoskirk

Sharvanboskirk [Posted by Shar VanBoskirk]

Yesterday Yahoo! announced enhancements to its search advertising business and consumer experience.  These enhancements include the following:

  • Enhanced reporting -- Advertisers will now be able to see how their search ads are performing on Yahoo.com compared to partner sites also serving Yahoo! search ads

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