Big Pharma Big Data Trends

Skip Snow

While I don't cover big pharma on its own, I am keenly interested in it and follow it with some passion, having in my career worked for several pharma firms as a consultant.

I have spoken to several pharma folks about data since arriving at Forrester. Some of what I learned was surprising. Some of what I learned reinforced my views coming to this job.

Important leaders are saying that good data management gives companies a key and differentiated competitive advantage. We are hearing this in almost all of our conversations with pharma leaders. It is 100% top-of-mind for big pharma CIOs. http://searchcio.techtarget.com/video/JJ-Pharma-CIO-Healthcare-data-management-will-revolutionize-her-business

But what are the trends, and what are the best practices?

We are hearing from all the pharma stakeholders four stories that are driving the questions that are being asked of the data:

  1. Pharma needs to get away from its focus on molecules and pivot to a holistic view of disease. As per a senior IT manager at a major pharma in a meeting with me last week: "We have to deliver whole solutions, and not just pills." 
  2. Pharma needs to understand prescribing behavior in the formulary and in the physician's office better in order to influence it and thus drive sales. As per a senior marketing manager from a meeting recently: "In the old world, we just sprayed and prayed," meaning that the marketing campaigns aimed at the physician did not discriminate as to who that physician was.
  3. Genomic-based drugs are driving changes though the amounts and types of data that the industry must manage.
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Q&A With Tony Ezell, Vice President, Chief Customer Officer, Eli Lilly And Company

Harley Manning

Interest in customer experience at pharmaceutical companies has shot up in the past few years. This came home to me more than a year ago at our 2012 Forum For Customer Experience Professionals East, where every meeting I took was with one or more decision-makers at pharma companies.

That’s one reason why I’m so excited that Tony Ezell, the chief customer officer at Eli Lilly, will be speaking at Forrester’s Forum For Customer Experience Professionals West in Los Angeles on October 9th and 10th (he’ll be on the first day, right after the opening Forrester keynote by Megan Burns).

But there’s another reason why I’m looking forward to Tony’s speech. In talking to him during the run-up to our event, I’ve gotten a good look at what he’s doing and why it matters to so many people. Because let’s face it: The prescription drugs we take go right to the most important experience in most of our lives — our health.  

Why does customer experience matter to a life-sciences company like Lilly, and what is it doing to make it better? We recently put some of these questions to Tony, and you can read his answers below. I hope you enjoy them and that I get to see you in Los Angeles where we can all hear Tony in person.

Q. When did your company first begin focusing on customer experience? Why?

A. Lilly’s focus on customer experience actually can be traced back to the company’s beginning in 1876 when Colonel Eli Lilly went against the trend of the time and focused on developing products of the highest quality to provide the best experience for his customers.

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Healthcare, The Supreme Court, And Customer Experience: What It Means

Harley Manning

The Supreme Court decision upholding virtually all of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (AKA “Obamacare”) shifted a balance for customer experience professionals in the healthcare industry. Now they — and the executives they report up to — know that it’s more risky to do nothing than to respond by taking action.

Keeping in mind that “the healthcare industry” is really three industries, here are some of the most important actions that healthcare organizations will need to take.

Health Insurance Providers (Payers)

As we point out in our upcoming book, Outside In, the health insurance industry has owned the cellar of our Customer Experience Index (CXi) since we began that study five years ago. The main reason for its dismal performance is that the CXi is a consumer study, and for health insurance providers, the customer has not been a consumer but a business — or more accurately, a person at a business, like a benefits manager.

The result was that payers didn’t need to focus much on the end users of their products — consumers — so most of them didn’t. But starting in 2014, a greater percentage of their business will come from consumers. That will drive health insurance providers to better understand consumers so they can attract and retain the healthiest ones, who are the most profitable. Payers will also want to get consumers to change their behavior as a way to keep costs down. For example, they’ll want them to opt for generic drugs and to take better care of themselves. But none of that will happen unless the health insurers build a trusting relationship by providing a far better experience than they have to date.

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Are You Ready To Strategically Rightsource Your IT Portfolio?

James Staten

It's time for IT to get out of the business of running everything itself and move into the role of delivering technology value to the business. This is a core theme that runs through a large majority of Forrester's research and our advice to clients. But exactly how do you make this transition? Well, a good example can be found in Amylin Pharmaceuticals.

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