S&R Analyst Spotlight: Josh Zelonis

Stephanie Balaouras

Based on the West Coast, Senior Analyst Josh Zelonis is the newest addition to the S&R team. When he’s not out cruising his Harley, Josh is working with clients to adapt their architecture, policies, and processes to evolving threats and to develop robust incident response programs. His research focuses on threat intelligence, endpoint detection and response (EDR), malware analysis, pen testing/red teaming, forensics and investigations, and of course, incident response.

Josh Zelonis Image

Prior to joining Forrester, Josh accumulated over 13 years of experience as a security practitioner with demonstrated success in product architecture, engineering, and security assessment roles. As a product architect, Josh helped design and build innovative technologies in the breach detection space, architecting both endpoint and appliance products with a focus on data collection and analytics. His background also includes extensive experience in security assessment roles including red team, vulnerability research, and compliance.

Listen to Josh’s conversation with me to hear about his biggest surprises since starting as a Forrester analyst, his most frequent client inquiries, and the topics he's excited to research in the coming year:

To download the MP3 version of the podcast, click here.

What do you foresee as the biggest threat to security and privacy in the United States in the next ten years?

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Cybersecurity Takes Center Stage In US Presidential Election

Stephanie Balaouras
Last week, WikiLeaks posted a treasure trove of internal emails from the Democratic National Committee (DNC). The leaked emails demonstrated a clear bias within the DNC against Bernie Sanders and for Hillary Clinton, when the organization claimed to be neutral. The incident:
 
  • Confirms two of our 2016 cybersecurity predictions:
    • In 2015, we predicted that cybersecurity would become a major issue in the 2016 US presidential election. Not only have candidates discussed cybersecurity issues such as encryption throughout the debates, with the DNC email leak, cybersecurity itself is taking center stage in the election and influencing events. It is worth noting that hacking during election season is not purely a US-related issue. The entire voter registration database of the Philippines, which included fingerprint data, was hacked this spring.
    • We also predicted that an executive would need to step down due to a cybersecurity breach. As the result of the embarrassing emails, the DNC chairwoman, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, has announced her resignation at the end of the DNC convention.
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Forrester’s Security & Risk Spotlight – Jeff Pollard

Stephanie Balaouras

One of the S&R team’s newest additions, Principal Analyst Jeff Pollard comes to Forrester after many years at major security services firms. His research guides client initiatives related to managed security services, security outsourcing, and security economics, and integrating security services into operational workflows, incident response processes, threat intelligence applications, and business requirements. Jeff is already racking up briefings and client inquiries, so get on his schedule while you still can! (As a side note, while incident response is generally not funny, Jeff is. He would be at least a strong 3 seed in a hypothetical Forrester Analyst Laugh-Off tournament. Vegas has approved that seeding.)

Jeff Pollard Image

Prior to joining Forrester, Jeff served as a global architect at Verizon, Dell SecureWorks, and Mandiant, working with the world's largest organizations in financial services, telecommunications, media, and defense. In those roles he helped clients fuse managed security and professional services engagements in security monitoring, security management, red teams, penetration testing, OSINT, forensics, and application security.

 

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Is Breach Notification A Part Of Your Incident Response Plan?

Heidi Shey

Is customer-facing breach notification and response a part of your incident response plan? If should be! This is the part where you notify people that their information has been compromised, communicate to employees and the public about what happened and set the tone for recovery. It's more art than science, with different factors that influence what and how you do the notification and response. Unfortunately, many firms treat breach notification as an afterthought or only as a compliance obligation, missing out on an opportunity to reassure and make things right with their customers at a critical time when a breach has damaged customer trust.

At RSA Conference last week, I moderated a panel discussion with three industry experts (Bo Holland of AllClear ID, Lisa Sotto of Hunton & Williams, and Matt Prevost of Chubb) who offered their insights into the what to do, how to do it, and how to pay for it and offset the risk as it relates to breach notification and response. Highlights from the discussion:

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10 Questions To Help Differentiate Incident Response Service Providers

Rick Holland

I frequently help Forrester clients come up with shortlists for incident response services selection. Navigating the vendor landscape can be overwhelming, every vendor that has consultant services has moved or is moving into the space. This has been the case for many years, you are probably familiar with the saying: "when there is blood in the water." I take many incident response services briefings and vendors don't do the best job of differentiating themselves, the messages are so indistinguishable you could just swap logos on all the presentations.

Early next year, after the RSA Conference, I'm going to start a Forrester Wave on Incident Response services. Instead of waiting for that research to publish, I thought I'd share a few suggestions for differentiating IR providers.

  1. What is their hourly rate? This is typically my first question; I use it as a litmus test to figure out where the vendor sits in the landscape. If the rate is around $200 you are typically dealing with a lower tier provider. Incident response is an area where you get what you pay for. You don't want to have to bring in a second firm to properly scope and respond to your adversaries. 
  2. How many cases have they worked in the previous year? You want to hire an experienced firm; you don't want to work with a consultancy that is using your intrusion to build out the framework for their immature offering. While volume alone shouldn't be the key decision point, it does give you an objective way to differentiate potential providers.
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The State Of Business Continuity – We Have A Long Way To Go To Achieve True Resiliency

Stephanie Balaouras

Aug. 29, 2015 marked the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. During the storm and the ensuing chaos, 1800 people lost their lives in New Orleans and across the Gulf Coast. Many of these deaths, as well as the extensive destruction, could have been avoided or minimized if there had been better planning and preparedness in anticipation of just such an event, and if there had been much better communication and collaboration throughout the crisis as it unfolded. Responsibility falls on many from government officials (at every level) to hospitals to businesses to individuals. If there is any silver lining to such a destructive event, it’s that it forced many in the US to be much better prepared for the next major catastrophe. Case in point, in October 2012, Superstorm Sandy barreled through the Caribbean and the eastern US, affecting almost half of the states in the US. The storm caused unprecedented flooding and left millions without access to basic infrastructure and thousands without homes, but this time, about 200 people across 24 states lost their lives.

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Introducing A New Incident Response Metric: Mean Time Before CEO Apologizes (MTBCA)

Rick Holland

For years cybersecurity professionals have struggled to adequately track their detection and response capabilities. We use Mean Time to Detection/Containment/Recovery. I wanted to introduce an additional way to track your ability to detect and respond to "sophisticated" adversaries: Mean Time Before CEO Apologizes (MTBCA). Tripwire’s Tim Erlin had another amusing metric: Mean Time To Free Credit Monitoring (MTTFCM).

Here are some examples (there are countless others) that illustrate the pain associated with MTBCA:

1) CareFirst breach announced 20 May 2015

2) Premera breach announced 17 March 2015

Your CEO doesn't want to have to deliver a somber apology to your customers, just like you don't want to have to inform senior management that a "sophisticated attack" was used to compromise your environment. Some of these attacks may have very well been sophisticated but I'm always skeptical. In many cases I think sophisticated is used to deflect responsibility. For more on that check out, "The Millennium Falcon And Breach Responsibility."  

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New Research: Know Your Adversary

Rick Holland
Mandiant's APT1 report changed the threat intelligence marketing game, and you would be hard pressed to find a cybersecurity company that doesn't have a research/intelligence team that produces threat actor reports. The previous few weeks have seen a significant amount of threat intelligence marketing around threat actor groups. FireEye released "APT28: A Window into Russia’s Cyber Espionage Operations?" The analytics firm Novetta released "Operation SMN: Axiom Threat Actor Group Report."  
 
We have even seen law enforcement documents on threat actors. In August, Mr. Su Bin, a Chinese national, was indicted for the theft of Boeing’s trade secrets. The criminal complaint regarding Su Bin’s activities became public in June and offers a fascinating perspective into espionage as a service.  
 
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got STIX?

Rick Holland
The sharing of threat intelligence is a hot topic these days. When I do conference speeches, I typically ask how many organizations see value in sharing, and most in the room will raise their hand.  Next, I ask how many organizations are actually sharing threat intelligence, and roughly 25% to 30% in the room raises their hand. When our 2014 Security Survey data comes in, I will have some empirical data to quote, but anecdotally, there seems to be more interest than action when it comes to sharing. I wrote about some of the challenges around sharing in “Four Best Practices To Maximize The Value Of Using And Sharing Threat Intelligence.” Trust is at the epicenter of sharing and just like in "Meet the Parents," you have to be in the circle of trust. You can enable sharing, but automating trust does take time. 
 
 
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Choose Your Own Adventure With The 2014 Verizon DBIR

Rick Holland

In a world where every single security vendor has their own annual threat report, the Verizon Databreach Investigations Report (DBIR) is the gold standard, and this year is no different. Last year I began blogging my initial analysis (Observations on the 2013 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report), and I wanted to continue that again this year.  Here are some of the high-level details on this year's report: 

  • Fifty organizations representing 95 countries were included in the data set. This included 1,367 confirmed data breaches. By comparison, last year’s report included 19 organizations and 621 confirmed data breaches.
  • In a significant change, Verizon expanded the analysis beyond breaches to include security incidents. As a result, this year’s dataset has 63,437 incidents. This is a great change, recognizes that incidents are about more than just data exfiltration, and also allows for security incidents like DoS attacks to be included.
  • The structure of the report itself has also evolved; it is no longer threat overview, actors, actions and so on. One of the drivers for this format change was an astounding discovery. Verizon found that over the past 10 years, 92% of all incidents they analyzed could be described by just nine attack patterns. The 2014 report is structured around these nine attack patterns.  
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