Welcome to the I&O Transformation Playbook.

Jean-Pierre Garbani

To complement the brilliant introduction to the “Infrastructure Transformation Playbook for 2015” by my friend Glenn O’Donnell, the operation’s analyst team, the “O” in I&O, would like to welcome you to the “Infrastructure And Operations Transformation Playbook for 2015”.

In this playbook, we do not predict the future of technology but we try to understand how, in the age of the customer, I&O must transform to support businesses by accelerating the speed of service delivery, enabling capacity when and where needed and improving customers and employee experience.

All industries mature towards commoditization and abstraction of the underlying technology because knowledge and expertise are cumulative. Our industry will follow an identical trajectory that will result in ubiquitous and easier to implement, manage and change technology.

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Introducing Forrester’s Infrastructure Transformation Playbook

Glenn O'Donnell

Forrester’s Infrastructure and Operations research team has been on the leading edge of infrastructure technology and its proper operational aspects for years. We pushed the industry on both the supply side (vendors) and the demand side (enterprises) toward new models and we pushed hard. I’m proud to say we’ve been instrumental in changing the world of infrastructure and we’re about to change it again!

As the entire technology management profession evolves into the Age of the Customer, the whole notion of infrastructure is morphing in dramatic ways. The long-criticized silos are finally collapsing, cloud computing quickly became mainstream, and you now face a dizzying variety of infrastructure options. Some are outside your traditional borders – like new outsourcing, hosting and colocation services as well as too many cloud forms to count. Some remain inside and will for years to come. More of these options will come from the outside though, and even those “legacy” technologies remaining inside will be created and managed differently.

Your future lies not in managing pockets of infrastructure, but in how you assemble the many options into the services your customers needs. Our profession has been locally brilliant, but globally stupid. We’re now helping you become globally brilliant. We call this service design, a much broader design philosophy rooted in systems thinking. The new approach packages technology into a finished “product” that is much more relevant and useful than any of the parts alone.

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Our Gesture Controlled 3D Computing Future: Beyond Leap Motion

JP Gownder

Today saw the release of Leap Motion, the 3D gestural navigation controller for PCs and Macs. Like its cousin the Xbox Kinect, Leap Motion uses sensors to track physical gestures. Where Kinect tracks your entire body, Leap Motion tracks fine movements of the arms, hands, and fingers. In turn, this allows users to input information, enabling touch-free 3D gestural navigation control.

Leap Motion can be used to navigate operating systems (Windows, Mac), to cruise through Google Earth,  to draw a digital picture, to generate experimental music, or to dissect a virtual frog, as seen in the AirSpace Leap Motion app store. In the future, surgeons could perform surgeries and airline pilots could control their plans with this solution, according to the vendor.

The success or failure of Leap Motion will derive from the strength of the app ecosystem that grows up around it:

  • As with touch screen, ground-up applications work best... “Touch-first” applications – those reimagined from the ground up with touch as the primary navigational method – generally appeal to users better than “touch-second” experiences where touch was added to an existing application. Similarly, gesture-controlled experiences need to be rethought from the ground up.The same is true for voice-controlled apps. Developers will need to change the way they work in coming years, collaborating with designers and experts in human anatomy, for all of this to work. Until that happens, the technology will remain marginal.
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