Communications, Training, And Routines: How Companies Socialize Customer Centricity

Sam Stern

In my latest report, "Communication, Training, And Routines: How Companies Socialize Customer Centricity," I explain how companies that want to create a more customer-centric culture use communication, training and routines to help employees adopt a customer-centric point of view. The report provides the following examples and recommendations to help companies socialize customer-focus with all employees. 

Communicate the importance of customer-centricity. Effective communications programs share updates with employees about initiatives to reinforce customer focus and highlight the importance of customer experience to the organization. As part of their customer-centric communication programs, companies should connect senior leaders with frontline employees and ensure that all corporate communications reinforce customer focus.

  • Companies like Avis Budget Group and E-Trade focus on changing the tone and content of all corporate communications.
  • General Motors (GM) assigned leaders the task of explaining the new customer focus to their respective departments. Involving senior leaders in this way reinforced to all employees that customer centricity was now an organizational imperative.
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Fairy Tales As A Boardroom Strategy

Andrew Rose

Communication is an essential part of the CISO's role, but too often we get it horribly wrong. That was the message laid out by communications expert David Porter at the RSA Conference in Europe recently.

We know that a large part of the CISO’s role is to influence, cajole and encourage our business leaders to make the right choices, enabling our firms to manage risk and move forward safely. Creating compelling communications is a differentiator, but too few CISOs excel in this area and this is holding back their credibility, their career and the risk posture of their employers.

David Porter proposed spending a great deal more time than most of us would be used to, refining the introduction to any piece of communication, and actively crafting it to flow from ‘Situation’  (“Once upon a time there was a beautiful princess..”) to ‘Complication’ (“..who was imprisoned in a tall tower by her wicked step-mother”). That sounds pretty standard, but it was interesting how David then analysed different RSAC submissions and showed how even the professionally written ones deviated from this model, and how much clearer they were once the rule had been applied.

This simple setup opens up the readers/listener's mind and plants questions that seek to understand how the story can be resolved, and stories are powerful communication tools.

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Personal Communication Services and Social Collaboration Are Entering The Workplace

Dan Bieler

By Dan Bieler and Enza Iannopollo

Personal communications services, which we define as communication and collaboration services that merge private, social and business communication in one personal view, are becoming part of the work environment. Services like Skype or Google Apps allow users to speak and send messages across multiple communications services to communicate and collaborate just as they would as consumers within a corporate context. Empowered employees expect to use these collaboration channels not just for personal use but also for work.

Although Skype has been around for more than decade, the market for personal communications services in a business context is still very much evolving. The personal communication experience is complex and challenging, as individuals wrestle with multiple communications services to manage an increasingly diverse set of communication and collaboration technologies.

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