Australian Financial Services Get Going To Improve Digital Customer Experience

Clement Teo

I had the pleasure of conducting a Digital Maturity Assessment workshop with a colleague from Forrester Consulting for about 20 companies in Sydney recently. The majority of participants were from the Australian financial sector, with heavier representation from marketing departments than technology management. While the session was an abridged one intended to discuss, understand, and determine where the participants were on their digital business journey, it was productive and revealed that:

  • Participants knew what to do with digital business transformation, but struggled with howParticipants had started on the digital transformation journey, but needed to address cultural and organizational gaps to fully drive transformation. These issues include who owns the digital transformation agenda (does it sit with the CIO or CMO?), how to bridge the communication chasm between the CIO’s department and the lines of business, and how to measure results to drive transformation in a positive direction.
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Government CIOs And CMOs Unite! Governments Must Embrace The "Marketing" Function

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Here at Forrester we are busy planning our upcoming Forum For CIOs And CMOs.  With a theme of “Building A Customer-Obsessed Enterprise” the event explores the partnership between marketing and technology leaders. But what about our government clients?  The role of marketing is associated with the private sector. Companies employ marketers to identify their target markets and the opportunities for providing goods and services to them. Public-sector organizations don't typically have the luxury of  choosing their target market or their products and services. Or at least that’s what most organizations think. But even if that is the case, it doesn't mean that these organizations shouldn't get to know their "customers" and understand how best to meet their needs. While the service might be prescribed by legislation or regulation, public organizations can influence the customer experience, and the rising focus on citizen engagement mandates they do so.

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Nearly Half Of Indian CMOs Are In Search Of New Digital Vendors

Manish Bahl

I have recently published a report and series of blog posts highlighting CMO tech spending trends in India and what these trends mean to CIOs in the country. In this post, I will touch upon the emerging marketing technology landscape as a result of rising CMO tech budgets that both provide opportunities for and pose threats to CIOs.

Our research shows that nearly 50% of Indian CMOs are in search of new suppliers with specialized technologies and processes to build new digital engagement systems, such as mobile apps, social media applications, or customer loyalty management solutions. The marketing technology landscape is rapidly increasing in complexity, which is having multiple effects (figure below):

                                                                 

  • Software players are now targeting CMOs’ tech budgets with marketing-savvy offerings. For instance, Adobe, IBM, Oracle, and salesforce.com have invested a total of more than $20 billion in marketing technology M&A over the past three years.
  • Major Indian tech services firms are also gearing up to target digital opportunities.
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In Spite Of Similar Business Priorities, CIO-CMO Collaboration Is A Long Way Off In India

Manish Bahl

I’ve just published a report on CMO tech spending trends in India and what these trends mean for CIOs in the country. We found that Indian CMOs’ top two business priorities are addressing the rising expectations of customers and acquiring and retaining customers; 87% and 85%, respectively, of those we surveyed indicated that these are a critical or high priority. Interestingly, Indian CMOs’ business priorities echo those of Indian CIOs: 87% of Indian CIOs previously surveyed by Forrester cited addressing rising customer expectations as their organization’s top business priority (figure below).

                                 

Despite these common goals, our findings reveal that Indian CMOs are driving their own tech agendas by:

  • Accelerating the growth of their tech budgets. 62% of the Indian CMOs we surveyed plan to increase their technology budget in 2014, whereas just 41% of them actually managed to do so in 2013.
  • Establishing their own technology departments. Forrester estimates that 30% to 40% of CMOs in India have no working relationship with their CIOs. About 40% of marketing leaders are gravitating toward establishing a technology department within marketing.
  • Getting more involved in planning sourcing strategy and selecting marketing technology vendors. About half of the surveyed CMOs get involved in setting the overall sourcing strategy, aggregating demand for technology products or services, and selecting vendors to meet their requirements.
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62% Of Indian CMOs Will Increase Their Tech Budget In 2014

Manish Bahl

I just published a report on CMO tech spending trends in India and what these trends mean for CIOs in the country. For this report, we surveyed 101 CMOs in India to understand business and marketing priorities, marketing spending on technology, key tech management challenges, and how digital engagement is shaping marketing technology trends in the country. Key highlights from the report:

  • The age of the customer demands that CMOs become customer-obsessed leaders. Indian CMOs’ top two business priorities are addressing the rising expectations of customers and acquiring and retaining customers; 87% and 85%, respectively, of those we surveyed indicated that these are a critical or high priority. Focusing on customers is not new for CMOs; what has changed is the pace at which customer expectations are rising.
  • CMOs are responding by driving their own tech agendas. Today’s customers want faster and better service — and CMOs are looking to technology to make that possible. Sixty-two percent of the Indian CMOs we surveyed plan to increase their technology budget in 2014, whereas just 41% of them actually managed to do so in 2013. About 30% of marketing leaders are gravitating toward establishing a technology department within marketing in order to become self-sufficient. They’re investing in mobile apps, customer analytics, and are looking for new suppliers in winning digital engagement strategy.
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Unleash Your Digital Business

Nigel Fenwick

In my last post I outlined the research we just finished on digital transformation. Today I'd like to highlight the key takeaways for CIOs.

CIOs are destined to play a pivotal leadership role in the transformation of business to a digital business. The nature of business is changing and, in turn, the technology investment priorities of the past must change. The report - Unleash Your Digital Business - describes the dynamic ecosystems of value that drive customer behaviors and transform the linear value chain into a dynamic network supported by open APIs. CIOs must partner with CMOs to drive the business transformation needed to become a digital business. To survive, your business will need to embrace digital customer experiences within ecosystems of value, and digital operational excellence to drive the agility and innovation required to survive and thrive in the age of the customer.

Digital Is More Than A Bolt-on Strategy

Bolt-on digital is like painting go-fast stripes on a car; it doesn’t change the underlying business. To become a digital business requires fundamental enterprise transformation; something CIOs are accustomed to leading and shaping. The partnership with the CMO must be extended to create operational excellence through digital technology, augmenting customer value with digital products and services and driving rapid innovation across the business.

Dynamic Ecosystems Of Value Drive The Ability To Win Serve and Retain Customers

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The Future Of Business Is Digital

Nigel Fenwick

Your company is likely to face an extinction event in the next 10 years. And while you may see it coming, you may not have enough time to save your company.

Business leaders don't think of digital as central to their business because in the past, it hasn't been. But now your customers, your products, your business operations, and your competitors are fundamentally digital. While 74% of business executives say their company has a digital strategy, only 15% believe that their company has the skills and capabilities to execute on that strategy (see figure). These are just some of the findings from our latest research (Forrester clients click here).

Forrester data on digital readiness

For the past few years, companies have been bolting “digital” onto their existing business like teens paint go-fast stripes onto their cars. “Look, we’re digital” is the message CEOs want to send to investors. But the piecemeal strategy of bolting digital channels or methods onto the business is no longer sufficient. Instead, you must think of your company as part of a dynamic ecosystem of value that connects digital resources inside and outside the company to create value for customers. To do this, you must fully harness digital technologies, both to deliver a superior customer experience and to drive the agility and operational efficiency you need to stay competitive.

Dynamic Ecosystems Of Value

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Sales Enablement And The CEO: Partners To Drive Growth In The Age Of The Customer

Scott Santucci

There sure are a lot of often-quoted factoids/observations about the state of affairs among sales forces. We are hearing and reading how:

  • Fewer salespeople are hitting quota.
  • Buyers are much more knowledgeable before they meet with salespeople.
  • Improving the volume or quality of leads boosts marketers’contribution.
  • Making it easier to access sales information helps.
  • Sales managers are not effectively coaching their sales teams.
  • Lots of spending is dedicated to better equipping sellers.
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It's A Marathon, Not A Sprint: Making The Switch To Customer-Driven Marketing

Corinne Munchbach

Update: The following post was written prior to today's shocking events at the Boston Marathon. All of Forrester sends out thoughts, prayers, and well-wishes to the runners, spectators, and their families affected by this senseless violence. — Cory

Today is just tax day to most of the US, but here in Boston, it's much more likely to be referred to as marathon Monday. Indeed, thousands of runners and wheelchair athletes are currently moving toward the finish line in the 117th running of one of the world's most famous and popular races: the Boston Marathon. For some, the goal is just to finish, while others are out to set personal records. And all have been training with a regimented, well-planned routine for months in anticipation of the big day. Marketers should take a page out of the marathoner's playbook when it comes to making the switch to the customer life cycle, a customer-driven marketing approach that will help your organization succeed in the age of the customer. CMOs in particular have the responsibility of transitioning marketing to a customer-first philosophy, and my latest report, "Evaluate The Completeness Of Your Marketing Effort," will help you get there (subscription required).

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So, You Think You Can Disrupt?

Corinne Munchbach

If you’ve turned on reality television lately (and I’m sorry if you have), you have seen a lot of overconfident folks who think highly of their ability to cook, sing, model, dance -- whatever -- when in actual fact most of them stink. The spectacle of these shows comes from watching to see if these people ever accept the painful gap between their perceived and actual abilities. 

From data we have just published today in a new Forrester report, Assess Your Digital Disruption Readiness Now (client access required), it turns out that digital disruption is like reality TV in at least this one way: There is a significant, even painful, gap between how ready some executives think they are to engage in digital disruption and the actual readiness of the enterprise. 

This disparity rears its ugly head at a crucial time. As Forrester principal analyst James McQuivey has recently written in his book Digital Disruption, digital disruption is about to completely change how companies do business. Digital tools and digital platforms are driving the cost of innovation down to nearly zero, causing at least 10 times as many innovators to rush into your market while operating at one-tenth the cost that you do. Multiply that together and you face 100 times the innovation power you did just a few years ago under old-fashioned disruption (see figure). 

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