Reflections From HPE Discover 2017

Eveline Oehrlich

From June 4 to 6, 2017, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise hosted an analyst summit in hot Las Vegas as part of its HPE Discover 2017 event. After a five-year journey of splitting, spin-merging, and getting smaller, CEO Meg Whitman and her staff took stage announcing their strategy and innovations to 9,000 attendees ranging from partners and customers from all over the world. This calls for some reflections about HPE’s journey, its past achievements, and its current focus areas and will help us understand where HPE is heading in the future.

I have been following HPE for almost 11 years and had a chance to meet Meg Whitman in September 2016 in Boston right after the company acquired SGI. I have seen HP split into HPE and HP Inc., creating two powerhouses and then again spin-merge its services teams into CSC (now DXC) and HPE Software into Micro Focus, which should be finalized by September 1, 2017. Meg has created four new companies out of one giant company, with each focused and poised to innovate, add value, and deliver outcomes to its installed base and new customers. In the past 12 months, HPE grew both organically and inorganically via good (and attractively priced) acquisitions such as Aruba Networks, 3Par, SGI, Nimble Storage, CloudCruiser, and Niara — all purposeful and aligned with two of its key strategies, supported by the 25,000-strong PointNext service organization.

HPE is clearly focused on all verticals and large enterprises of the world that face challenges in transforming towards a digital business all at different speeds. The spin-merging of HP Enterprise Services into what Meg calls its “cousin” DXC allows it to be even more partner-open, and the new GM Ana Pinczuk is eager to march her PointNext organization along HPE’s solutions as well as create additional competitive advantage with new service offerings.

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Cloud Security Spending Will Grow To $3.5 Billion By 2021

Jennifer Adams

Cloud is big business today. Forrester estimates that global cloud services revenues totaled $114 billion in 2016, up from $68 billion just two years ago — that’s annual growth of 30%. And we see the public cloud services market reaching $236 billion by 2020. What does this mean for cloud security?

·         This rapid shift to the cloud raises new issues and challenges for security and risk professionals. Traditional perimeter-based security tools do little to protect cloud workloads. Securing data and applications that reside in the cloud is increasingly critical as more mission-critical apps and high-value data and intellectual property move to the cloud.

·         Cloud security solutions are quickly evolving to meet these challenges. Our recently published Forrester Data: Cloud Security Solutions Forecast, 2016 To 2021 (Global) shows that we expect spending on global cloud security solutions to reach $3.5 billion by 2021 — an annual growth rate of 28% over the next five years. In the forecast, we examine four types of cloud security solutions: cloud security gateways; centralized cloud security management; hypervisor security; and native infrastructure-as-a-service/platform-as-a-service security.

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DevOps Has Reached “Escape Velocity”, CIO’s Need To Get Onboard!

Robert Stroud

In an era where velocity and agility are driving technology management organizations over simple cost reduction, every business must constantly evolve to drive business differentiation. Leveraging practices such as Lean and Agile, smaller changes, automated pipelines and product centric teams, DevOps is transitioning from unicorns and small projects to company-wide initiatives. Companies such as WalmartING and JetBlue to name a few are leveraging DevOps to drive their business transformations and are reaping the benefits or accelerated velocity across the organization. DevOps is a powerful approach available to the CIO to drive velocity and agility, supporting the innovation required to drive business transformation.

 

Unlocking the value requires cultural change

To unlock the promise of DevOps, CIOs must lead and support a cultural change within their technology management organization. As any leader knows, changing institutionalized behavior is the toughest of all management challenges and CIOs are understandably skeptical of new trends.  Despite this, CIOs must recognize when a trend becomes an imperative for survival. DevOps has become this imperative, and CIOs must engender a culture of collaboration and learning and enable their people with the right tools to drive holistic life-cycle automation.  

 

Lean processes are critical to success

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Reflections On Huawei’s Analyst Summit 2017 — Past, Present, And Future

Dan Bieler

In April 2017, Huawei hosted its annual Analyst Summit in Shenzhen, China. Huawei’s financial year 2016 was remarkable as the group grew revenues by 32% to US$ 75 billion, making Huawei the largest global network solutions vendor by revenues, way ahead of its traditional competitors Cisco, Nokia, and Ericsson. This calls for some reflections about Huawei’s journey, its past achievements, and its current focus areas. This will help us to understand where Huawei might be heading in the future.

I have been following Huawei for over 10 years. Over this short timeframe, I have seen Huawei grow into the largest global telco network infrastructure vendor, becoming a leading global smartphone manufacturer, migrating from a low-cost hardware manufacturer toward an innovative product developer, ramping up its service capabilities, moving into delivering products and services to the enterprise segment, and pushing into software development.

These achievements underline that Huawei has achieved an awful lot since rising from its humble beginnings as a producer of phone switches in Shenzhen in 1987. For years, its core competitors have underestimated the capabilities and determination of Huawei to succeed. At the Huawei Analyst Summit 2017, I picked up three key focus areas for Huawei in 2017:

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The Cloud Is Disrupting Hadoop

Brian  Hopkins

Forrester has seen unprecedented adoption of Hadoop in the last three years. We estimate that firms will spend $800 million in Hadoop software and related services in 2017. Not surprisingly, Hadoop vendors have capitalized on this — Cloudera, Hortonworks, and MapR have gone from a “Who?” to “household” brands in the same period of time.

But like any good run, times change. And the major force exerting pressure on Hadoop is the cloud. In a recent report, The Cloudy Future Of Hadoop, Mike Gualtieri and I examine the impact the cloud is having on Hadoop. Here are a few highlights:

●     Firms want to use more public cloud for big data, and Hadoop seems like a natural fit. We cover the reasons in the report, but the match seems made in heaven. Until you look deeper . . .

●     Hadoop wasn’t designed for the cloud, so vendors are scurrying to make it relevant. In the words of one insider, “Had we really understood cloud, we would not have designed Hadoop the way we did.” As a result, all the Hadoop vendors have strategies, and very different ones, to make Hadoop relevant in the cloud, where object stores and abstract “services” rule.

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DevOps, No Longer Just For “Unicorns”

Robert Stroud

The born-digital “unicorn” companies such as Etsy, Google and Netflix, are pioneers of modern DevOps, but BT leaders at companies of all ages, sizes, and types are now eagerly pursuing the same principles.[i] The pressure for speed and quality is DevOps becoming pivotal for all organizations. For example, KeyBank is leveraging DevOps to quickly deliver business new customer capability using streamlined coordination between application development and operations. DevOps is allowing KeyBank to shorten delivery time by up to 85% and reduce defects by at least 30%.  According to a 2016 State of DevOps report, high performers are twice as likely to exceed their organization’s profitability, market share, and productivity goals.[ii]

Understand Your Company's Requirements For Modern Service Delivery

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Master The Cloud-Native Solution Ecosystem Of Container Software

Charlie Dai

Container technologies allow enterprises to create highly differentiated apps and services faster, with better quality and geographic reach, to create compelling customer experiences. They have quickly become an important element of digital business transformation for EA pros because they promise faster software delivery, tremendous scale, higher resiliency, greater flexibility, and broader implementation options. Everything about enterprise app infrastructures, development styles, and architectures is changing, and containers play a key role in each area.

However, Forrester’s TechRadar™ for business technology infrastructure found that containers and container management technologies are still in the Creation stage, meaning that some container components and management tools are immature and changing quickly. Companies must navigate a complex landscape of technology components to build, package, and deploy containers. To help tech management pros accelerate cloud evolution, I’ve recently published a report with Dave Bartoletti focusing on the software landscape for each layer in a typical container management software architecture. Some of the key takeaways:

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Effective Metrics Are Critical For DevOps and Agile Success

Robert Stroud

In the days of old, not very long ago, release cycles were measured in years —organizations were using “on-time” and “on-budget" as the mantra for project efficacy. Business today is compelled to deliver business technology in cycles of hours, or days. Faster cycles render not only tradition “waterfall” processes and silo based IT obsolete, it also renders traditional metrics ineffective! These arcane metrics no longer deliver the visibility and granularity tech pros need to fine-tune their delivery capability. The mission has transitioned to rapidly deliver high quality, high value solutions. For all, this is a significant shift from the past, when the main points of focus were schedule, cost, and efficiency. Modern software metrics — speed, quality, and value — are based on continuous feedback from business partners and customers.

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The Next Step In Web CMS Evolution

Mark Grannan

Today, we publish the Forrester Wave™: Web Content Management Systems, Q1 2017 after three months of research and another month of writing and editing. Today, we can step back and begin to help our clients leverage this research to shape their digital experience strategy. But first, a special thank you to my colleagues Danielle Geoffroy, Allison Cazalet, Stephen Powers, and Ted Schadler for their invaluable contributions. Also, thank you to the 15 vendors -- Acquia, Adobe, Crownpeak, Episerver, e-Spirit, Hippo (BloomReach), IBM, Jahia, Magnolia, OpenText (TeamSite), OpenText (WEM), Oracle, Progress Software, SDL, and Sitecore -- and their client references who made this research possible.

So where to start? At the highest level, we’re witnessing a step-function along our evolutionary journey thanks to digital. Digital disrupts communication, community, privacy, convenience, products, and services because always-on connections change our demand cycles. Those enterprise organizations who don’t evolve are being disrupted. My colleagues on customer experience research team have shown this correlation of revenue being tied to customer experience, across industries and geographies (link). Additionally, we’re starting to understand how digital maturity stages correlate to technology priorites such as Web CMS with Forrester's Digital Maturity Model (link):

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Welcome to 2017: The year of #DevOps

Robert Stroud

We are eager to announce a beacon of light to help penetrate the post-holiday fog: Forrester’s DevOps Benchmark Survey for 2017 is officially live! Led by myself and Researcher Elinor Klavens, this benchmark survey serves as the backbone for a large portion of our DevOps research, facilitating the identification and tracking of trends and supporting our research including predictions for the future. Pivotal to many of our reports, this is your opportunity to shape our research, including our upcoming report “Six Trends That Shape DevOps Adoption In 2017 And Beyond.”

The DevOps survey expands on the extensive data contained in Forrester’s Business Technographics survey, drilling into the context, adoption, use, and plans with DevOps. The research team uses the survey’s findings to provide deeper, more informed insights to help guide your DevOps journey.  Questions - including how you are dealing with the business mandate of velocity, how DevOps is changing your culture, and where you see DevOps heading - are partnered with practical use of tools and automation.

No matter where you are on your DevOps journey, please take five minutes to complete the survey! All participants can receive an executive summary of the results of the survey after it closes on February 13, 2017.

Additionally, should you want to share your DevOps experiences in more detail or provide more feedback please connect with me at RStroud@Forrester.com or @RobertEStroud

Again, welcome to 2017, the year of #DevOps….