CIOs Will Lead The Digital Change – Or Be Usurped - In 2015

Pascal Matzke
Rapidly evolving customer expectations continue to drive changes across all facets of business. Consumers and business customers increasingly expect real-time access to status, service, and product information. Rapidly changing consumer expectations ripple throughout the supply chain, shortening product cycles and requiring more agile manufacturing capabilities.
 
Forrester believes that 2015 will serve as an inflection point where companies that successfully harness digital technology to advantageously serve customers will create clear competitive separation from those that do not. CEOs will shift more investment funds to creating digitally connected products and solutions. Products like connected cars, connected running shoes, or connected aircraft turbines are creating new value propositions that tie these products closer to the customer engagement lifecycle and help create new business models. Data as a product or service will create new revenue and customer value streams. For example, sensor-embedded tractors already generate data that power John Deeres’ FarmSight service. And as industrial players like General Electric, Philips, Robert Bosch and ABB learn to act more like software companies by creating value through software, their underlying business models will change rapidly. 
 
As businesses pursue digital transformation, their CIOs will reset their priorities accordingly. Together with my colleagues Bobby Cameron, Nigel Fenwick and Jennifer Belissent we brought together the top predictions for CIOs in 2015. In particular, we predict that CIOs will:  
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CMOs Boldly Reach For More Influence Across The Enterprise In 2015

Sheryl Pattek
For as long as there have been children and travel, frustrated parents have been subjected to repeatedly hearing a simple, “Are we there yet?” In their innocence, children seem to understand that all journeys should lead to a final destination; with those journeys never reaching their destination quick enough.
 
Empowered buyers have raised the ante to successfully win, serve, and retain them, increasing the pressure on organizations to accelerate their journey to customer obsession. But almost halfway through the decade, we find organizations struggling to find the right leader to seize the reins and transform the organization to be laser-focused on the customer. Enter the CMO.
 
In 2015, Forrester believes CMOs will step forward and take responsibility for turning the enterprise toward the customer, evolving their role into the engine that fuels customer-centric company growth. It’s time for CMOs to cultivate the trust, respect, and collaboration across the entire C-suite and use that influence to ask for the right to not only hold but also turn the keys to the customer.
 
My colleagues, James L. McQuivey, Moira Dorsey, Laura Ramos, Sarah Sikowitz, Tracy Stokes, and I therefore studied the landscape and expect CMOs to seize this new opportunity to both shape their personal success and accelerate the growth of their organizations in 2015. In particular, we predict that:
 
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Bridging The CIO/CMO Disconnect In Asia

Fred Giron

It’s a fact: Marketers in Asia purchase digital technologies without involving the tech management department. They do it because they believe that:

  • Digital technologies are key enablers of successful marketing strategies. Customers in Asia Pacific in general, and in Singapore in particular, are always connected and empowered by technology to access the right information in their moments of need. They increasingly value — and do business with — organizations that provide them with experiences that are effective, easy, and emotional across all customer touchpoints. It’s not a surprise, then to see marketing professionals — just like their colleagues in sales, product management, and customer service — source digital technologies to enable such experiences.
  • The tech management department hinders their business success. This is the more worrying part, but if you take a step back, as a technology management professional, you understand why. You work with technology life cycles that are oriented toward core business, back-end systems like enterprise resource planning and therefore are risk-averse and slow. However, marketers need tech management professionals who are open to innovation, experimentation, and moving toward a risk-tolerant, agile life cycle that supports digital experience delivery.
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