Brexit Makes Customer-Focused Innovation Imperative

Dan Bieler

Photo: Cover of Panorama magazine Italia

While uncertainty continues, focusing on innovation is your best chance of success. British Prime Minister Theresa May has repeatedly said, "Brexit means Brexit." This statement ensures that every business operating in the UK will experience an uncertain and volatile market environment for some time. In our conversations with CIOs and chief technology officers (CTOs) since the Brexit vote, Forrester has retained its view that only if companies retain a focus on customers will they ensure growth and innovation, especially in times of uncertainty. All CIOs and CTOs at businesses operating in the UK should:

  • Make the business case that innovation can help their firms deal with uncertainty. Top management will be distracted by many short- term tactical considerations relating to Brexit. Make the case that innovation will move you closer to your customers and help to deal with underlying uncertainty.
  • Partner with their risk managers. Developing innovations that rely on customer and machine data will expose businesses to regulatory and compliance risks. Plan your business technology and innovation strategies with the risk manager on your side.

The report Brexit Makes Customer-Focused Innovation Imperative summarizes Forrester’s recent discussions and outlines how companies can best drive their innovation in the wake of Brexit.

Categories:

Brexit Vote Means Weaker UK And European Tech Market In 2016 And 2017

Andrew Bartels

As soon as the news of the Brexit vote in the UK came out, the Forrester team began revising our UK and European tech market forecast to take into account the economic implications and uncertainties of the voters’decision that the UK should leave the EU. Based on this revised analysis, we predict the UK tech market will grow by just 1% (pounds sterling) in 2016 with zero growth in 2017, compared with our prior forecast of 5% in both years.

Europe as a whole, will post no growth in 2016 (euros), and just 1% growth in 2017  two percentage points slower than our earlier forecast. With the plummeting pound and enervated euro, European tech market measured in US dollars will be similarly weak with 0.2% growth in 2016 and 1.1% in 2017.

The slowing of UK and European tech market growth results from multiple uncertainties created by the Brexit vote coming on top of what was already a weak and shaky European economy. As a result:

  • The UK economy, which had been outperforming most of the Eurozone countries, will take a hit. The Belgian, Dutch, French, German, Italian, and Swiss economies, which are growing by 1-1/2% or less, are vulnerable to declines, with Italy especially exposed due to a looming banking crisis.
  • Greece and Portugal are struggling once again, with threats of renewed recessions leading to declines in tech spending.
  • The only countries with decent economic growth and above average tech market growth are Ireland and Spain in the Eurozone, and Sweden, Poland, and other Central European countries outside it.
Read more

After Brexit, it's business as usual for most of Europe's public cloud workloads

Paul Miller

The flags of the European Union and the United Kingdom

(source: Wikimedia Commons)

Two weeks on, the result of the UK referendum on membership of the European Union (EU) continues to reverberate around the world. Forrester provided advice for clients needing to understand the business implications. Looking at the specific impact on public cloud deployments in Europe introduces a number of additional points. These are best considered in three separate contexts:

  • that of companies wishing to serve customers in the UK
  • that of companies wishing to serve customers in the remaining 27 EU member states (the EU27)
  • that of companies wishing to serve customers in the EU27 from a base in the UK.
Read more

After Brexit, Will Paris Become The New Startup Hub In Europe?

Thomas Husson

Paris will be the capital of technology innovation and startups for the next three days with more than 5,000 startups, 400 speakers, 30,000 attendees, and 100 top VCs attending Viva Technology Paris.

CEOs and CMOs of the largest French companies will attend and speak as well as Eric Schmidt from Alphabet/Google, John Chambers from Cisco, David Marcus and Sheryl Sandberg from Facebook, Tim Armstrong from AOL, Robin Li from Baidu, Yuanqing Yang from Lenovo, and many others.

Vendors will demonstrate lots of innovation, including Sony Playstation’s Virtual Reality, Tilt Brush and Jacquard by Google, and Facebook’s pop-up, not to mention numerous talks and roundtables on AR, VR, drones, robots, 3D printing, wearable tech, machine learning, and connected cities and homes.

Let’s face it: Until now, London was the primary digital hub attracting lots of startups, investor money, and digital talent. Following Brexit, Forrester expects digital and customer-facing talent to migrate out of the UK. Beyond company headquarters, there is a new competition between Paris, Berlin, Dublin, Amsterdam, and Barcelona, and many other cities to attract startups and R&D centers.

The timing is perfect for Viva Technology Paris to offer a unique opportunity to showcase France’s assets:

Read more