Haste Makes Waste — Take Your Time When Selecting Business Applications

Jost Hoppermann

When my teenage son is interested in purchasing a mobile phone, some PC equipment, or a games console, he will typically spend weeks gathering the necessary information to arrive at a well-informed decision. He once told me that he feels this is necessary to make the best use of his savings — a trait that I do not always observe banks around the world exhibiting.

Recently I had a phone call with a few people from the business side of a medium-size bank somewhere in the world. Their challenge? They wanted to use the best method to find the mobile banking application most suited to their bank. Their real challenge? They had no time to make a deeper assessment of their individual business and technology situation and only wanted to get proof that their approach would be the right one. They wanted a clear recommendation within a few days.

Unfortunately, it’s not that easy. When I know nothing about a bank’s business environment, its supporting application landscape, and its underlying technology, I am very reluctant to offer more than a long list of business applications, regardless of whether the topic at hand is mobile or cross-channel solutions, core banking, or something else. This is in line with a research report about best practices for banking platform transformation that Forrester published some time ago. At the time, we identified a few key reasons common to major banking platform transformation failures. One of those reasons: ill-designed shortcuts.

Read more

Highlights and Thoughts From Finovate Fall 2013

Peter Wannemacher

[note: this was written live last week while I was attending Finovate]

Greetings from the Big Apple! I’m here attending the fancy schmancy Finovate Fall 2013 conference featuring tech solutions and innovations from – and for – the financial services industry. Here are some of the offerings and presentations that stood out for me, in the order they were presented at Finovate:

  • Kofax offers process automation software for lenders, but the big takeaway for me was their recent expansion of mobile, cross-channel, and multichannel analytics for financial providers. Focused on how customers shop for a loan, the dashboard and data are digestible and actionable. The jury’s still out, but strong analytics and easy-to-use tools can help banks improve sales in their lending lines of business.  
  • MoneyDesktop offers digital money management tools – also known as personal financial management or PFM – and their demo at Finovate continued to show their strengths: Nifty tools, clean design, and intuitive UI and UX. The question mark for banks, however, continues to be how well integrated – or better yet, embedded – the experience can/will be for end users.
Read more

Influence Forrester’s Future Banking Apps Coverage

Jost Hoppermann

Forrester’s latest survey on financial services architecture shows that financial services firms in general, and banks in particular, put a high priority on a few selected topics (see the figure below). Our banking-specific research for AD&D professionals has focused on topics like banking architecture, banking platforms including core banking, Internet and mobile banking (to be published soon), and multichannel enablement. Forrester’s more industry-neutral research has covered aspects such as analytics, business intelligence, big data, customer relationsship management and other, less industry-specific, areas of business applications.

We have also started preparing a report about the key building blocks of today’s risk management solutions. However, my recent discussions with Forrester clients have covered plenty of additional topics, including anti-money-laundering, branch apps, private wealth management, lending in retail/consumer banking, corporate/commercial lending and its syndicated flavors, mortgages, trading, and treasury, just to mention a few.

Read more

Q&A with Paul Cobban, Managing Director, COO, Technology and Operations, DBS Bank

Dane Anderson

In advance of Forrester's Summit for CIOs in Singapore on August 30, I had an opportunity to speak with Paul Cobban about his successful transformations at DBS Bank over the past few years. Based in Singapore, Paul oversees business transformation, operational excellence, customer experience, IT project office, procurement, real eastate, operational risk and business continuity management.  I've had a sneak peak at his event presentation and it is excellent.  Paul is a progressive CIO at the forefront of BT innovation and business engagement with a lot of valuable insight to share. 

1. What do you think IT departments are doing right and wrong these days?

In banking the IT departments have had to change enormously in recent years.  On top of the usual relentless advances in technology, security challenges have escalated, the war for talent has accelerated and regulation continues to evolve with the challenges. I believe that IT departments have had to adapt well to these changes. 

However, in most companies there is a lack of a truly customer centric design. Although there is some hype in the industry around service-oriented architecture (SOA), I believe that until budgets are allocated around customer processes rather than by functional units, systems will continue to be designed as applications for the department users rather than with the customer in mind. In addition, most companies fail to take usability seriously and have little concept of cross touchpoint consistency.

2. How do you measure ROI for IT? 

Read more

Getting To Wow At Wells Fargo

Harley Manning

Does a big bank care about customer experience? And if so – why?

Those are the fundamental questions answered for Wells Fargo by its CMO, Jamie Moldafsky, at Forrester’s Forum for Customer Experience Professionals in New York on June 25.

Going into the event, I didn’t envy Jamie’s task. The four large banks that dominate the U.S. retail banking industry don’t have stellar reputations for delivering a great customer experience. Feedback from their own customers bears this out: In Forrester’s Customer Experience Index, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Citibank, and Chase received scores ranging from 60 to 69 on a 100 point scale. In contrast, credit unions have an average score of 82, and regional banks like SunTrust Bank, PNC, and TD Bank have scores in the high 70s.

But to be fair, when you have 70 million customers spread across more than 90 businesses – as Wells Fargo does – delighting everyone might just be mission impossible.  And yet that’s exactly what Jamie and her team are trying to do on their journey to “get to wow.”

In the following video snippet of her speech, Jamie explains why customer experience is important to Wells, what she’s trying to accomplish, and the factors that make her mission both challenging and critically important.

As always, we welcome your comments! And if you're interested in seeing more great speakers like Jamie, check out our upcoming Customer Experience Forums in Los Angeles in October and London in November.

 

Read more

Q&A with Jamie Moldafsky, Chief Marketing Officer, Wells Fargo & Company

Harley Manning

Marketing and customer experience are two sides of the same coin: Marketers are responsible for communicating the brand promise, and customer experience professionals are responsible for making sure that the promise is kept.

It’s that synergy between marketing and CX that led us to invite Jamie Moldafsky, CMO at Wells Fargo, to speak at Forrester’s Forum for Customer Experience Professionals in New York on the morning of June 25. As a run-up to our event, Jamie took the time to answer a few questions about why Wells Fargo cares about customer experience and how its approach to CX has evolved over the years.

Enjoy!

Q: When did your company first begin focusing on customer experience? Why?

Treating customers with courtesy and respect has been a core value at Wells Fargo for more than 160 years. Back in 1888, its agents were given the following instructions: “Proper respect must be shown to all — let them be men, women, or children, rich or poor, white or black—it must not be forgotten that the Company is dependent on these same people for its business.”

Read more

Time To Start Planning For The Next Generation of Digital Banking

Catherine Graeber

Rising digital customer expectations advances in technology, and continued digital disruption threats from outside the industry will change the game for banks and credit unions.  2013 will be a pivotal year for eBusiness and channel strategy executives to start planning for the next generation of digital banking to both stay relevant to digital customers and thwart disruptors determined to take over those customer relationships.

In my new report, titled "Trends 2013: Five Trends Shaping The Next Generation Of North American Digital Banking," I explore the trends that will power next generation of services that are simple, ubiquitous, empowering, and reassuring.  Here are the key takeaways:

  • Customers' digital financial expectations are high.  With the proliferation of digital devices, consumers are highly connected to their financial providers. And with adoption of each new device comes higher expectations of those providers, especially among the younger generations. Get it wrong and you risk losing their loyalty.
  • Our app-driven world will require flexible and extensible digital platforms. Creating a durable competitive advantage, one that can't easily be copied, includes a move to open platforms. An open platform strategy will allow financial firms to use third-party providers to create app solutions that will create differentiation through a personalized user experience and segment-specific capabilities.
Read more

Who Leads In Mobile Banking: Forrester Ranks 15 Banks Around The World

Peter Wannemacher

Mobile banking success is a moving target: Customers needs and expectations are changing rapidly, and eBusiness teams at banks are sprinting to get ahead of their customers’ expectations. To achieve this, firms are rolling out new features, optimizing existing services, and enhancing mobile experiences.  

To understand which firms are leading in mobile banking — and to better gauge the mobile banking landscape overall — we used our Mobile Banking Functionality Benchmark to evaluate and rank the mobile banking efforts of 15 of the largest banks in North America, Western Europe, and Australia.

Our findings across all the banks we evaluated can be found in our 2013 Global Mobile Banking Functionality Rankings. We've also published two additional reports looking at the banks we reviewed in the UK and the US: 2013 UK Mobile Banking Functionality Rankings and 2013 US Mobile Banking Functionality Rankings

Highlights of this research include these findings:

  • Chase takes the top spot overall. Chase received the highest overall score among the banks we evaluated, netting a score of 71 out of 100. The bank offers mobile banking services across a range of touchpoints ranging from smartphone apps, strong mobile websites, and two-way SMS. In addition, Chase also has strong mobile money movement features such as bill pay – including the ability to add a payee – and mobile transfer capabilities.
Read more

ONE SMALL STEP FOR CREDIT AGRICOLE, ONE GIANT LEAP FOR THE DATA ECONOMY

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Banks have a reputation for being stodgy and conservative. But Credit Agricole (CA) has broken the stereotype. I had a great discussion a few weeks ago with Bernard Larrivière, Director of Innovation, and Emmanuel Methivier, the CA Store Manager, about the CA Store launched last fall. The store houses new services developed by third-party developers using the bank’s secure customer data — one small step for CA, one giant step for the banking industry and the data economy.

The CA Store was not only inspired by the Apple Store model but also by government open data initiatives. The public sector provided the model of exposing APIs to internal data and working with independent developers to encourage application creation. However, in a move that will likely be carefully watched by their public sector brethren, CA recognized the need for a better business model to incent developers to use the data, and to sustain the development and maintenance of the applications. 

Read more

Open Data Is Not Just For Governments Anymore...

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

. . . Nor has it ever really been. Government data has long been a part of strategic business analysis. Census data provides insights into local standards of living and household budgets, health needs, education levels, and other factors that influence buying patterns for all kinds of goods and services. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics and the International Labour Organization provide data on employment and the availability of skilled labor that helps inform decisions on where to locate manufacturing or other facilities. The World Bank and UN data provides insights into global trends. 

Moreover, the release of government data has itself spurred billion-dollar industries. Think weather data released in the 1970s by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – which gave birth to the weather industry and services like Accuweather, weather.com, wunderground, and newer services like ikitesurf.com’s “wind and where.” Data from the US Global Positioning System (GPS) was opened to civilian and commercial use in the 1980s and has given rise to thousands of location-based services. Think FourSquare, Yelp, and Where’s The Bus?

Read more