Apple Does The Right Thing To Defend Customer Privacy

Fatemeh Khatibloo

By now, most of you have read about Apple's powerful public statement of refusal to comply with a court order compelling the firm to help the FBI gain access to the data stored in the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone 5. Specifically, the FBI requires Apple’s help disabling the device’s data auto-erase function after 10 incorrect password attempts, and Apple is refusing to modify the software to enable this.

Over the past three years, Apple has hitched its brand wagon to privacy, because the firm believes that a) customers care enough about privacy to vote with their dollars and b) as the steward of people’s most personal, sensitive data, Apple has an obligation to serve their best interests. While this isn’t the first time that Apple has found itself targeted by regulators over privacy, this is the firm’s staunchest defense yet against government intrusion. Forrester believes that, with this move:

  • Apple is putting its money where its mouth is. Until recently, there has been plenty of debate about whether Apple has simply been paying lip service to privacy. But this move — along with its recent shuttering of the iAds business — proves that Apple is making serious product and business model changes in support of user privacy. Tim Cook is holding fast on the line he drew in the sand last year at the EPIC’s (Electronic Privacy Information Center’s) Champions of Freedom event in Washington, DC, where he said:
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