Mobile Security Technologies 2015

Tyler Shields

Today, I'm officially kicking off the 2015 version of the Mobile Security Technology Radar and I need your help! 

Mobile security is one of the fastest changing, most dynamic markets that I have ever seen in my life (and I've been around the block a few times). Just when enterprises think they have it all figured out, a new shiny blinking toy is released that promises to secure mobility better than ever before. I began formally tracking the mobile security space for Forrester in the summer of 2013. One of my early reports was the 2013 Mobile Security Technology Radar which I slightly updated in the winter of 2014. Both enterprises and vendors alike responded very positively to these reports, citing the valuable insights that allowed them to predict the movements of a market that changes faster than Katy Perry at the super bowl halftime show.

What isn't always evident in the reports that we write at Forrester is the depth and details in the research we do. For example, the graphic below represents quantified survey results of industry experts, vendors, and customers of mobile device management technologies that offers insite into the market sentiment on MDM solutions in 2013. MDM was a pretty hot technology in the summer of 2013 and the lack of red market sentiment helped us predict that this technology would thrive in the near future (see graphic below). Things really get interesting when we have year over year trending data to help us gain additional insite into the future market movements.

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The Mobile App Gap: Still A Billion Apps Short

Ted Schadler

Think 1.5 million apps is a lot? Pfffft. Netcraft reports 175 million active websites globally. Each one of those sites has many "apps" embedded in it -- one for shopping, one for service, one for each region or product line. I'm guessing we have a global app potential of 1 billion. 

The ancient elders of the web era -- vendors, webmasters, marketers, technology managers, agencies -- all appear to operate under the delusion that if they add responsive web templates to their site, they can make each of those billion experiences a mobile moment. Pfffft. They can't. Responsive web techniques are better than nothing -- at least Google will stop cramming your site to the bottom of the search list. But it's not enough to serve customers in their mobile moments of need.

To do that requires knowing exactly what someone needs, then creating the shortest path from I Want to I Get. And that means nailing the mobile moment.

We know already that people spend more time shopping on their smartphones than on computers. We know already that 70% of the traffic to around Black Friday 2014 came from mobile devices. We know already that 69 million Americans go online more often from smartphones than any other device. [Source: Forrester Research] 

Mobile is not an option. It's your reality. Mobile is as urgent for business customers and employees as for consumers. Here's what one manufacturer had to say: "Our customers look for us when they're installing our equipment in their datacenter. If we're not on their smartphone, then we don't exist." 

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To Be Customer-Obsessed, Firms Must Also Be Technology-Obsessed

Ted Schadler

There is much talk about being customer-obsessed. What does it take to be customer-obsessed?

Recently, in The New Yorker, Mary Powell, CEO of Green Mountain Power, a small energy company in Vermont, told a story of customer-obsession. Her customer-obsession starts simply: Help customers reduce their energy footprint at no net cost. Green Mountain accomplishes this by investing hugely in the latest and best technology, to pull electricity from the sun, insulate the bejesus out of the house, run massively efficient heat pumps, and micro-manage the draw on the power grid draw. Yes, the capital expenses and labor costs are immense. But when you reduce a home's energy footprint by 85%, you reduce the $250 electric bill by 85% -- or more than $25,000 over 10 years.

Green Mountain Power has a customer-obsessed culture and a customer-obsessed operating model. But it also has become expert in using technology to win, serve, and retain customers. The company is technology-obsessed, often out ahead of even the pundits when it comes to the latest technology. Green Mountain Power unites all three forces to be customer-obsessed: culture, operating model, technology.

The same is true for every company and government. Igniting a culture of customer experience is important. Relentlessly improving the operating model to put customers first is also important. But without the right customer-serving business technology in place, customers will be stuck with ancient web sites, cranky mobile apps, pathetic call centers, and disempowered employees.

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Is Zombie Data Taking Over?

Michele Goetz

It is easy to get ahead of ourselves with all the innovation happening with data and analytics. I wouldn't call it hype, as that would imply no value or competency has been achieved. But I would say that what is bright, shiny, and new is always more interesting than the ordinary. 

And, to be frank, there is still a lot of ordinary in our data management world.

In fact, over the past couple of weeks, discussions with companies have uncommonly focused on the ordinary. This in some ways appeared to be unusual because questions focused on the basic foundational aspects of data management and governance — and for companies that I have seen talk publicly about their data management successes.

"Where do I clean the data?"

"How do I get the business to invest in data?"

"How do I get a single customer view of my customer for marketing?"

What this tells me is that companies are under siege by zombie data. 

Data is living in our business under outdated data policies and rules. Data processes and systems are persisting single-purpose data. As data pros turn over application rocks and navigate through the database bogs to centralize data for analytics and virtualize views for new data capabilities, zombie data is lurching out to consume more of the environment, blocking other potential insight to keep the status quo.

The questions you and your data professional cohorts are asking, as illustrated above, are anything but basic. The fact that these foundational building blocks have to be assessed once again demonstrates that organizations are on a path to crush the zombie data siege, democratize data and insight, and advance the business. 

Keep asking basic questions — if you aren't, zombie data will eventually take over, and you and your organization will become part of the walking dead.

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Forrester’s Security & Risk Analyst Spotlight – Nick Hayes

Stephanie Balaouras

He declined to live tweet his upcoming wedding from the altar, but there is no doubt that Nick Hayes is the social media expert on Forrester’s S&R team. He has extensive knowledge of the security, privacy, archiving, and compliance challenges of social media, as well as the technical controls used to address them. He also specializes in the tools that monitor and analyze social data to improve oversight and mitigation tactics of myriad reputational, third-party, security, and operational risks. He is certainly aware of the reputational risk of staring at your cell phone when you’re supposed to say, “I do”, but maybe if you follow him (@nickhayes10), you might get lucky with a pic or two -- and some good risk thoughts to boot.

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Global Tablet Forecast: Consumer Is Volatile But Business Tablets Are Resilient

JP Gownder

Tablets, once the darling of the consumer electronics industry, have hit hard times -- if you measure by shipments and sales. While the installed user base continues to grow -- Forrester forecasts that 580 million people will be using tablets globally by the end of 2015 -- shipment numbers have been disappointing, even looking at Apple's iPad. In Q2, 2015, Apple sold 12.62 million iPads, a whopping 23% drop compared with Q2, 2014 when the company sold 16.35 million. Clearly, all is not well in tablet-land.

We lay out the reasons for this generalized market volatility in our major new forecast report, Global Tablet Forecast 2015 to 2018: Despite Market Volatility, Tablets Are Big In Business. Some important factors? A lack of replacement behavior, whereby many consumers hold on to older tablet models, has persisted due to a lack of genuine new innovations (and the fact that, say, an iPad 3 still works well). We present other factors in the full report.

But there's a bright spot in the tablet industry -- the company-purchased segment. Our forecast shows that enterprise tablets are growing as a percentage of the market, from 6% in 2010 to 20% by 2018. These tablets can be Apple iPads, Windows-based tablets, or Android devices, and they are generally purchased and managed by the company on behalf of employees, who might receive them individually or, in other use cases, share the devices.

The enterprise segment is being driven by a variety of factors.

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How To Go From Dinosaur To Eagle - Or Risk Being The CISO That Got Hit By The Comet

Peter Cerrato

Peter Cerrato is a principal consultant for Forrester's Business Technology consulting practice.  

A very strange and sudden thing happened 66 million years ago. A comet crashing into the Mexican Yucatan peninsula near Chicxulub put an end to the long reign of the dinosaurs. But not so fast. We now know that some of those dinosaurs survived the massive Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event: the smaller, faster, feathered and headed-toward-warm-blooded early ancestors of our eagles and hawks.


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IBM Pushes Chip Technology with Stunning 7 nm Chip Demonstration

Richard Fichera

In the world of CMOS semiconductor process, the fundamental heartbeat that drives the continuing evolution of all the devices and computers we use and governs at a fundamantal level hte services we can layer on top of them is the continual shrinkage of the transistors we build upon, and we are used to the regular cadence of miniaturization, generally led by Intel, as we progress from one generation to the next. 32nm logic is so old-fashioned, 22nm parts are in volume production across the entire CPU spectrum, 14 nm parts have started to appear, and the rumor mill is active with reports of initial shipments of 10 nm parts in mid-2016. But there is a collective nervousness about the transition to 7 nm, the next step in the industry process roadmap, with industry leader Intel commenting at the recent 2015 International Solid State Circuit conference that it may have to move away from conventional silicon materials for the transition to 7 nm parts, and that there were many obstacles to mass production beyond the 10 nm threshold.

But there are other players in the game, and some of them are anxious to demonstrate that Intel may not have the commanding lead that many observers assume they have. In a surprise move that hints at the future of some of its own products and that will certainly galvanize both partners and competitors, IBM, discounted by many as a spent force in the semiconductor world with its recent divestiture of its manufacturing business, has just made a real jaw-dropper of an announcement – the existence of working 7nm semiconductors.

What was announced?

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Nintex To Purchase Drawloop — Enters Emerging CCM Cloud Market

Craig Le Clair

Nintex is expanding into the emerging cloud-based workflow market — by acquiring Drawloop, an Irvine, California-based document generation provider: Drawloop is one of the top 10 paid apps in the Salesforce AppExchange, with more than 1,000 customers, yet relative to the core customer communications management (CCM) market that has matured in a batch world driven by large-print service-bureau requirements, it is an effective but "light" solution. It gets high marks for usability, where less often means more. And you are fine if all data comes out of Salesforce, but what if you need to combine it with other data from core systems? What if you have 10,000 templates to manage, and what if you need to visualize complex data associations or have large batches of documents to deliver routinely? We will look harder at these questions during the next CCM Forrester Wave™, which will include Drawloop as well as Conga and perhaps other emerging cloud solutions. Overall, this is a strong acquisition that positions Nintex's BPM capability more securely in the Microsoft and Salesforce cloud ecosystems.

Syncplicity Gets Its Own Independence Day

Cheryl McKinnon

It’s been a busy couple of weeks for major players in the increasingly colliding enterprise content management (ECM) and enterprise file sync and share (EFSS) markets. Hot on the heels of the IBM-Box partnership, announced on June 24, 2015, today we see Syncplicity spin-out of EMC. Press release here. Skyview Capital LLC, a global private investment firm, has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Syncplicity, although EMC will retain a financial interest in it.


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