Improving Mobile App Quality Testing

John M. Wargo

In 2014, Michael Facemire and Rowan Curran published a report entitled A Benchmark To Drive Mobile Test Quality. The report covered how organizations had to adjust mobile app testing in a world with an overabundance of mobile devices and applications in constant enhancement mode (very frequent updates). As the new guy, I was asked to do an update to the report, so I reviewed what already existed and proceeded to do some research to see what had changed in the market since the original report was published. Well, my update to the report is called Improving Mobile App Quality Testing and it was just published today.

Later this month, I will be completing reports on HTTP/2 as well as an update to Building High-Performance Mobile Experiences, a report by Jeffrey Hammond and Michael Facemire. 

Find Premium Digital Development Talent With The 3 C's

Anjali Yakkundi

This a guest post by Danielle Geoffroy, a Research Associate on the Application Development & Delivery (AD&D) team.

You have a people and organization problem. In our 2015 survey, we asked what the biggest barriers to success are when it comes to delivering customer-facing mobile and web experiences. The answer didn’t surprise us – the top three challenges were all talent-related. Digital experience delivery is the new black, and in order to incorporate it into your strategy and brand, you need to hire a new breed of development and delivery talent: technologists that are creative, understand business goals, and are up to date on new technology and languages (think WCM, not just ERP, and Javascript, not just Python).

In order to hire this premium talent, you must think like the talent. These designers, developers, creators didn’t grow up in the suit and tie corporate world, and will need competitive salaries and benefits plus much more: meaningful, fast-paced work cultures that foster development.

In order hire this talent that has new priorities, we identified three C’s to build your perfect match digital experience team:

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Robots Won't Steal All The Jobs -- But They'll Transform The Way We Work

JP Gownder

This morning, WIRED published an article about my new Forrester Big Idea report, The Future of Jobs, 2025: Working Side-By-Side With Robots. You're probably familiar by now with the panic-stricken books (like Martin Ford's Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future) and headlines (HBR's What Happens When Robots Replace Workers?) proclaiming that the future of employment is bleak because of the rise of automation technologies. In other words, the meme goes, robots are taking all the jobs.

By "robots," we mean all forms of automation technologies, including those that conduct physical tasks, intellectual tasks, or customer service tasks (which mix elements of both physical and intellectual activities, but which constitute a distinct category in the age of the customer). Indeed, some impressive new technologies are becoming incredibly useful in a variety of organizational settings. Take, for example, Rethink Robotics' Baxter robot, seen in the video below. Unlike traditional industrial robots, it's safe for workers to be around Baxter -- and it's imperative, too. Because software engineers don't program Baxter; human colleagues simply move the robot's arm to teach it new actions, and it learns in real time.

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Exploit The Top Mobile Mind Shift Technologies

Dan Bieler

Picture: Leonardo da Vinci

As change agents, CIOs, CTOs, and technology and strategy managers need to help design great mobile moments that drive revenue growth, improve the customer experience, and eventually help transform their organization’s business model. Technology will play a major role in this endeavor. To succeed, it is important to remember that:

  • There will not be one single new revolutionary mobile technology. Many mobile technologies are coming of age; their true potential will unfold through the intelligent combination of mobile technologies to support mobile moments. The goal for the CIO should not be to chase the latest mobile technology, but rather to combine emerging mobile technologies in the most effective manner.
  • Mobile has moved well beyond smartphones and tablets. Mobility is now embedded in nearly every business process in both the consumer and business markets. Wearables and all sorts of devices and machines are becoming part of the mobile universe. The Internet of Things will also have a strong mobile dimension.
  • CIOs must focus on the mobile technologies with the greatest user impact. As CIOs create their business technology (BT) agendas, they need to take a more proactive approach to understanding and investing in emerging technologies for competitive differentiation. CIOs need to identify and catalog the customer impact of the main emerging mobile technologies that will help their organizations thrive in the age of the customer.
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You May Not Need A CDO — But Wouldn’t You Want To Improve Your Odds Of Success?

Gene Leganza

Jennifer Belissent and I just published a report on the role of the Chief Data Officer that we’re hearing so much about these days – Top Performers Appoint Chief Data Officers. To introduce the report, we sat down with our press team at Forrester to talk about the findings and about the implications for our clients.

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You May Not Need A CDO - But Wouldn’t You Want To Improve Your Odds Of Success

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Gene Leganza and I just published a report on the role of the Chief Data Officer that we’re hearing so much about these days – Top Performers Appoint Chief Data Officers.  To introduce the report, we sat down with our press team at Forrester to talk about the findings, and the implications for our clients.

Forrester PR: There's a ton of fantastic data in the report around the CDO. If you had to call out the most surprising finding, what would top your list?

Gene:  No question it's the high correlation between high-performing companies and those with CDOs. Jennifer and I both feel that strong data capabilities are critical for organizations today and that the data agenda is quite complex and in need of strong leadership. That all means that it's quite logical to expect a correlation between strong data leadership and company performance - but given the relative newness of the CDO role it was surprising to see firm performance so closely linked to the role.

Of course, you can't infer cause and effect from correlation – the data could mean that execs in high-performing companies think having a CDO role is a good idea as much as it could mean CDOs are materially contributing to high performance. Either way that single statistic should make one take a serious look at the role in organizations without clear data leadership. 

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Turn CMO-CIO Collaboration into Digital Action at Forrester’s Asia Pacific Summits

Dane Anderson

September winds bring the spring to Sydney, the official end of the monsoon to Mumbai, more of the same to equator-bound Singapore and Forrester’s CMO-CIO Summits to all three! We are looking forward to bringing together the region’s digital business leaders in Singapore on September 2, Sydney on September 16 and Mumbai on September 22. Themed “Build Your Customer-Obsessed Enterprise”, Forrester’s 2015 Summits will focus on how to strengthen the vitally important CMO-CIO partnership to build a customer-obsessed digital business. 

Our agenda will focus on the specific roles and responsibilities of CMOs and CIOs on the digital journey and the collaboration points between them. We will explore how CMOs can drive digital customer experience (DCX) and how CIOs can support their progress by driving digital operational excellence (DOX). Instead of frothy appeals that explain the importance of the CMO-CIO partnership, we will provide specific steps that will enable a roadmap to better teamwork.

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Security In The IoT Age: Makers Vs. Operators

Tyler Shields

Check out my latest research on IoT security: An S&R Pros Guide To IoT Security

Internet of Things (IoT) security is a hot topic among security and risk professionals. It seems as if every "thing" on the market is becoming smarter and more interactive. As the level of IoT device maturity increases so does the level of risk of data and device compromise. The scary thing is that we really have no idea what IoT devices are in our environment let alone the correct way to secure them. 

Both IoT product makers and IoT product operators need to understand the security implications of IoT devices. Security in IoT involves product makers rethinking how they create technologies, secure code and hardware, develop new offerings, and ensure the privacy of the data they collect. These areas of security are not typically areas that automobile, manufacturing, and retail technology makers have had to consider in the past.  The scale of IoT devices in each vertical is enough to employ a small army of developers who are yet not up to speed on the latest secure code and hardware concepts.

On the other side of the coin, enterprises have the unenviable position of implementing these poorly coded and built technologies. Overwhelming pressure will come from competing enterprises causing an increase in IoT adoption to improve business efficiencies. IoT will become pervasive, and mandatory, throughout every vertical from gas and electric to automotive. The threat landscape in these areas will be immense.

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The Future Of Telcos Remains Precarious

Dan Bieler

The old telco business model is breaking up. Telcos are at a crossroads, with one path leading to becoming pure utilities, another to transforming into important members of digital ecosystems, and a third to their complete demise.

Telcos have had years to prepare for this situation, but few have used their time effectively. At this stage, I see few reasons to be optimistic about the prospects for most telcos to recover the ground they’ve lost to other players in the emerging digital ecosystems because:

  • Consumers care more about apps and devices than connectivity than ever.One main impact of the onslaught on telcos by over-the-top providers like Facebook and handset manufacturers like Apple has been to push telco brands to the back of the consumer’s mind. Consumers care more about which handset and apps they use than which connectivity provider they have. Telco brands just don’t rock as they used to years ago.
  • Business leaders do not see telcos as the first choice to provide ICT services.Data from Forrester’s Global Business Technographics® Networks And Telecommunications Survey 2015 shows that business and IT users trust systems integrators and independent solution specialists more than telcos with a wide spectrum of voice, data, and managed services. One of the reasons is that business and IT users feel that telcos don’t understand their specific business requirements sufficiently.
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The Fragmenting SFA Ecosystem

Kate Leggett

Sales organizations, for the last couple of decades, have used sales automation (SFA) to manage account and contact data, sales pipelines, territories and more – all inside-out capabilities that help optimize their productivity, The problem is that today, customers control the conversation that they have with companies. Customers increasingly demand effortless sales interactions that increasingly trend toward self-service. They demand interactions tailored to their particular industry, pain point, and profile. They want streamlined interactions that value their time, such as a simple, efficient quote-to-order process or a contract renewal process.

Today sales organizations struggle to provide sales experiences in-line with customer expectations. They cant:

  • Support buyers on their terms. Buyers increasingly leverage mobile touchpoints, self-service, and digital channels to interact with companies which sales organizations cannot support.
  • Get sales representatives to follow consistent processes. Sales managers have sales reps of different calibers, and they must up-level a team’s performance. Also, without a consistent sales process that clearly articulates conditions for the different stages, managers can’t accurately qualify their pipeline. This affects forecasts, valuation, and profitability.
  • Personalize conversations with stakeholders. Sales reps don’t have near real-time information about their prospect’s company or industry or about a particular stakeholder to make conversations more relevant. They may not understand relationships between stakeholders that are involved in a purchase. They often lack insight about the effectiveness of sales collateral for different stages of the sales journey.
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