Information Governance: Not A Product, Not A Technology, Not A Market

Cheryl McKinnon

The Information Governance report is out! Over the last few months I've test-driven my thoughts and data with many vendors and enterprise customers via conference presentations, webinars, and one-on-one discussions. For those who have shared their thoughts with me - thank you! Forrester subscribers can access it here.

Information Governance is red hot right now, and it was time for Forrester contribute a view on how IG helps companies meet their core corporate missions. Of course, better, consistent fulfillment of compliance obligations is essential, but so are objectives such as customer service, revenue growth, and improved agility in oh-so competitive markets. IG is not just about getting rid of junk content, it is - more importantly - about instilling trust in the data and communication we use to run our businesses.

Software is not a silver bullet for information governance. Look beyond vendor hype - IG is not something to go buy so you can say your company has it. Look at IG as an evergreen corporate objective, enabled by programs, policies, people- and yes, a range of technologies.

I'm going to add to the IG definition war this week, by describing information governance as:

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Software Is At The Heart Of A New Healthcare Revolution

Skip Snow

Automation drove weavers from their looms in the industrial revolution. The Internet’s and tools facilitated the movement of manufacturing process for most software from the high priced markets in the US to India. So too the digitalization of health records combined with the insight that data yields and embed into work flow engines of care delivery will radically change the healthcare ecosystem.

Since I joined Forrester research, in the fall of 2013, my perceptions of what drives change has changed. I thought that the socio-political forces were driving software to change healthcare. Now I think software is driving changes to the socio-economic fabric. While we pundits are busy noticing:

  • EMRs being implemented.
  • Master patient indexes are rolling out.
  • Capabilities shifting to mobile.
  • Insurance companies rolling out tools to better track and communicating with consumers.
  • Startups forging new methods and business models to engage patients.
  • Large consumer companies making moves to gain access to our healthcare data by offering us free tracking tools.
  • Telehealth encounters becoming increasingly important to the administration of care.
  • Big data and cognitive computing changing our understanding of epidemiology and personalized care decisions.
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Application Security Technologies List

Tyler Shields

Roughly a year and a half ago I began a process of measuring the importantance of technologies in the mobile security space. I'm currently beginning that same process for the application security market. Many technologies exist that provide business value to enterprises for the security of their applications, but which ones are better at delivering on the business value that the enterprise really wants? Have any of these technologies outlived their usefullness, falling to innovation and new ideas? Which technologies should the enterprise prioritize spending their limited security budget on? I hope to answer these questions and more!

I've identified nine distinct application security technologies that make up the application security market. (Link to additional details!). I'm sure there are technologies that I've missed and arguments to be made to remove something. As always, my research is significantly improved with your help! 

If you are interested in participating in this research or have feedback on the technology list, respond via this web form, in the comments below, or via email / tweet to tshields@forrester.com (@txs). 

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Continuous Delivery Pipeline tool categories

A Continuous Delivery pipeline is a (mostly) automated software tool chain that takes delivered code, builds it, tests it, and deploys it. This simple concept gets complicated by tool chain realities: no one vendor does everything that needs to be done in the pipeline, and new solutions are evolving every day.

To make sense of the CD pipeline tool chain, I have taken a close look at the market and have identified a set of tool categories. I'm sure I've missed something, and you may not agree with my categories, and in either case I would like to hear from you! You can either comment on this blog, reach me on twitter (@ksbittner), or email me (kbittner@forrester.com). If you think the categories sound right, I'd like to hear that, too. This is your chance to help define the continuous delivery tools market.

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Continuous Delivery Tools & Technologies

Continuous Delivery is a process by which source code is built, deployed to testing environments, test, and optionally deployed to production environment using a highly automated pipeline. Many different kinds of tools need to be brought together to automate this process. The tool categories described below provide the building blocks of the automated Continuous Delivery process.

Continuous Delivery Management

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Global Tech Market Looking Better For 2015, At Least In The US

Andrew Bartels

We have just published Forrester's semi-annual global tech market outlook report for 2015 and 2016 (see "The Global Tech Market Outlook For 2015 To 2016 -- Five Themes That Will Define The Tech Market").  In this report, we are projecting growth of 4.1% in 2015 and 6.3% in 2016 business and government purchases of computer and communications equipment, software, and tech consulting and outsourcing services measured in US dollars.  These growth rates are distinct improvements over the 2.3%  growth in 2014.  The strong dollar is a key negative factor in these forecasts; measured in local currency terms, the growth track for the global tech market is higher with a gentler upward slope, from 3.3% in 2014 to 5.3% in 2015 and 5.9% in 2016.

Our global tech market outlook can be defined with five main themes:

  1. Moderate 5% to 6% rates in 2015 and 2016 in local currency terms. While a stronger-than-expected US dollar has resulted in lower dollar-denominated growth rates for 2014 and 2015 than in our August 2014 projections, though a stronger-than-expected US dollar both years caused a downward revision in these growth rates.
     
  2. The US tech market will set the pace for the rest of the world in 2015 and 2016. Not only does the US have the largest country-level tech market by far, it will have one of the fastest growth rates at 6.3% in 2015 and 6.1% in 2016. US businesses and governments are also leaders in adopting new mobile, cloud, and analytics technologies. Among other large tech markets, China, India, Sweden, and Israel will also have strong tech market growth, while Brazil, Mexico, Japan, and especially Russia will lag.
     
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Security Of Your Data Doesn't Matter To Smart Device Vendors At CES Tech West . . .

Tyler Shields

The CES Tech West Expo has a number of specific areas of coverage including fitness and health, wearables, connected home, family safety, and some young innovative companies located in the startup area of the section. I spent a few hours interviewing and discussing the Internet of Things (IoT) with as many vendors as I could find. I had many good laughs and shed a few tears during the process. To describe the process, the general communication would go something like this:

Me: "Can you point me at the most technical person you have at your booth? I'd like to talk about how you secure your devices and the sensitive / personal data that it accesses and collects."

Smartest tech person at the booth: "Oh! We are secure; we [insert security-specific line here]."

Me: "Never mind . . ." (dejected look on my face).

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Driven to distraction - a new breed of contact center agents need new tools to succeed

Ian Jacobs

I first noticed the creeping changes a few years ago. In college I majored in comparative literature and averaged about five novels read per week. Even when I entered the hustle and bustle overdrive of the working world, I still rapidly pounded through stacks of books every month. Over the past few years, while I still read more than the average American, the act of actually finishing a book became something of a notable achievement. My brain was more easily distracted, my ability to focus on and engage with complex information diminished, and my capacity to multitask as required by a modern work environment was seemingly illusory.

Of course, I wasn’t alone in experiencing these changes. This distracted mental state has become a common problem among knowledge workers and heavy users of Internet and mobile technologies. Excellent books such as Distracted: The Erosion of Attention and the Coming Dark Age and The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains detailed the changes we are all undergoing and described much of the neuropsychological research that seeks to explain the mental modifications that have left us in such a state. At heart, the research shows that our tools have begun to shape our brains just as much as we fashion our tools--and not always for the better.

Such mental modifications would seem to pose some significant and idiosyncratic problems for customer service organizations. Indeed, a new generation of contact center agents has begun to vex application development and delivery professionals. The new agents seem reluctant to learn detailed product and service information that previous cohorts of agents had little problem with. These new agents prefer to learn where to find such information, but have little intention of actually memorizing product support details.

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Making Sense Of Digital Business: Four Can’t Miss Reports From 2014

Nigel Fenwick

In 2013 I wanted to help executives understand some of the fundamental changes that are happening in business because of the digital revolution. Big names capture the attention of the media – who in the USA could have failed to hear about the collapse of Blockbuster or Borders? Who in the UK could have failed to hear of the demise of HMV? When writing about these failures, most analysts highlight the disruptive companies that put them out of business; companies like Netflix, Amazon and Apple. But I wanted to know if there was something more fundamental going on that impacts the ability of an incumbent to defend against digital disruptors. So in 2013 I set out to research digital business successes and failures in an effort to uncover the secrets of digital mastery.

I captured insights from my research in reports published in 2014. Here’s my pick of the top four you should read to gain a deeper understanding of digital business (these reports are available to existing Forrester clients, non-clients can purchase them individually or download a summary from this page):

#1 The Future Of Business Is Digital  - The results of 18 months of research into what lies behind successful digital businesses were first published in March in this report. Originally published for CMOs and CEOs, the report was subsequently republished for CIOs as “Unleash your Digital Business”. This report highlights how digital business differs from traditional business; provides an overview of the customer’s dynamic ecosystems of value; and offers six strategies to help transform any business into a digital business.

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What I&O Leaders Should Look For At CES

JP Gownder

This weekend, I’ll be heading off to Las Vegas for the 2015 Consumer Electronics Show (CES). Infrastructure & Operations leaders should – and do – keep tabs on the news coming out of CES. In this era of consumerization, bring-your-own (BYO) technology, and Shadow IT, CES announcements affect the I&O role more than ever before. I have three tips for how to think about CES 2015:

  • Look at consumer technologies through a workforce lens. So many smart, connected products quickly migrate to the workforce. Sometimes these technologies enter via BYO and segue into company-owned, as tablets have done over the past few years. In other cases, vendors that target consumers immediately see the value their products can bring to workforce scenarios. For example, I recently spoke with Jonathan Palley, CEO of Spire, a wearable device that tracks not just activity but also state of mind (tension versus calm, focus versus distraction, and related states). While the product was launched to the consumer market just about a week ago, Jonathan made clear that “workforce is a huge part of our strategy as well.” Imagine helping workers remain in a more productive, less stressed state of mind via wearables.
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OpenStack Development Will Accelerate Rapidly In China Market In 2015

Frank Liu

As the interest of Chinese organizations to adopt cloud solutions for business transformation is increasing, OpenStack-based cloud solutions have become the hot topic in the China market in 2014. I believe that 2015 will be the key year for OpenStack and it will rapidly develop in China. Here’s why:

  • Government policy support. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) of China held the first China Open Source & Cloud Computing Summit (COSCCS) on December 11. At this event, the Chinese government for the first time officially declared its intention to support OpenStack ecosystems and encourage state-owned enterprises (SOE) to use OpenStack-based cloud products: “…through OpenStack, we can contribute to a good business model…” said the deputy minister of MIIT. Forrester believes that there will be more and more Chinese SOEs and local governments that will invest in OpenStack-based cloud project in 2015.
  • OpenStack is mature as a private cloud solution. With the launch of the Juno version in October 2014, OpenStack addressed many upgrade concerns, making it easier to roll back a failed deployment and ensure thorough cleanup. It also added a record 3,219 bug fixes and enterprise features, such as storage policies, provisioning of Hadoop and Spark, as well as network functions virtualization (NFV). Another specific advantage is that Chinese organizations are not facing the challenge to upgrade from early releases of OpenStack because the China market started deployment of OpenStack mostly from 2014 onwards.
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