Forrester’s Security & Risk Research Spotlight: Application Security and IoT Security

Stephanie Balaouras

Once a month I use my blog to highlight some of S&R’s most recent and trending research. This month I’m focusing on application security and asking for your help with some of our upcoming research into the security and privacy risks associated with Internet of Things (IoT). IoT is any technology that enables devices, objects, and infrastructure to interact with monitoring, analytics, and control systems over the Internet. The illustrious and debonair, Tyler Shields (@txs), will lead our research into IoT security, but as the risks become more and more concrete for various verticals, you can expect the entire team to engage in this research.

Take our IoT security survey and talk with our analysts! If you contribute to the emerging IoT market, please fill out this brief survey (http://forr.com/2015-IoT-Security-Survey). Participants will receive a complimentary copy of the completed research report and we'd be happy to interview anyone who would like to discuss IoT and security in detail. Be sure to reach out to Tyler (tshields@forrester.com) or Jennie Duong (jduong@forrester.com) if you’re interested.

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Systems Of Insight: Next Generation Business Intelligence

Boris Evelson

Earlier Generation BI Needs A Tune Up

Business intelligence has gone through multiple iterations in the past few decades. While BI's evolution has addressed some of the technology and process shortcomings of the earlier management information systems, BI teams still face challenges. Enterprises are transforming only 40% of their structured data and 31% of their unstructured data into information and insights. In addition, 63% of organizations still use spreadsheet-based applications for more than half of their decisions. Many earlier and current enterprise BI deployments:

  • Have hit the limits of scalability.
  • Struggle to address rapid changes in customer and regulatory requirements.
  • Fail to break through waterfall's design limitations.
  • Suffer from mismatched business and technology priorities and languages.
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The Rebirth Of iManage: A New Company With A Familiar Name Re-Enters The ECM Market

Cheryl McKinnon

Another week, another divestiture in the content management and collaboration market. A new - or more accurately, a re-newed - player enters the Enterprise Content Management market this week as iManage and HP make an apparently amicable split. Executives with longstanding roots in the iManage and Interwoven businesses, including Neil Araujo and Dan Carmel, have executed a management buyout to spin a revitalized iManage business out of HP’s Software division. iManage's press

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Let's Break All The Data Rules!

Michele Goetz

When I think about data, I can't help but think about hockey. As a passionate hockey mom, it's hard to separate my conversations about data all week with clients from the practices and games I sit through, screaming encouragement to my son and his team (sometimes to the embarrassment of my husband!). So when I recently saw a documentary on the building of the Russian hockey team that our miracle US hockey team beat at the 1980 Olympics, the story of Anatoli Tarsov stuck with me. 

Before the 1960s, Russia didn't have a hockey team. Then the Communist party determined that it was critical that Russia build one — and compete on the world stage. They selected Anatoli Tarsov to build the team and coach. He couldn't see films on hockey. He couldn't watch teams play. There was no reference on how to play the game. And yet, he built a world-class hockey club that not only beat the great Nordic teams but went on to crush the Canadian teams that were the standard for hockey excellence.

This is a lesson for us all when it comes to data. Do we stick with our standards and recipes from Inmon and Kimball? Do we follow check-box assessments from CMMI, DM-BOK, or TOGAF's information architecture framework? Do we rely on governance compliance to police our data?

Or do we break the rules and create our own that are based on outcomes and results? This might be the scarier path. This might be the riskier path. But do you want data to be where your business needs it, or do you want to predefine, constrain, and bias the insight?

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Microsoft Acquires Cloud Access Security Intelligence vendor Adallom

Andras Cser

Microsoft is doubling down on its cloud strategy and announced the acquisition of Adallom. Adallom offers transparent, cloud-based monitoring and alerting of cloud application use. It can detect if a user is performing suspicious actions (e.g. downloading the CRM database on a Friday afternoon). This signifies that cloud service provider vendors can no longer only offer IaaS security (see our Wave at https://www.forrester.com/The+Forrester+Wave+Public+Cloud+Platform+Service+Providers+Security+Q4+2014/fulltext/-/E-RES113065 ) but also help with understanding risks around non-sanctioned and sanctioned SaaS applications. Microsoft's success of incorporating Adallom's assets into the Azure portfolio will depend on the following:

1. How well will Azure AD premium work with Adallom?

2. How well will Office 365 work with Adallom?

3. How well  will Azure IaaS work with Adallom?

4. How Adallom will be able to support data protection and encryption?

5. How well Adallom will continue to work vendor agnostically with non-Microsoft IaaS and SaaS envrionments?

We will be publishing a Market Overview on Cloud Access Security Intelligence vendors (including Adallom) in Q3 of 2015. Stay tuned!

When it Comes To Site Search, Don't Make Your Customers Play 'Hide-and-Seek'

Dominique Whittaker
Picture this: you're on a website looking for this must-have item for someone special and you know that the product exists on the website but every time you search for it you can't find it for the life you! If you've never had trouble searching for a product or information on a website---well, you're lying. We know that customers are demanding effective and relevant search results in addition to a easy-to-use interface. If they don't get it, they're likely to look elsewhere for what they need---and nobody wants that.
 
Site search sounds like a no-brainer functionality that every website has and is an easy thing to do but relatively few companies have actually mastered site search. Done well, it: 
 
  • Promotes customer self-service. If your visitors are able to successfully find what they need, then you’ve done your job while also deflecting calls away from the more expensive contact center.
  • Increases time-on-site. When customers find what they’re looking for in a painless manner, they’re more likely to spend more time on your site, looking for additional information or products. 
  • Provides overall better customer experiences. Let’s be honest, site search isn’t  top-of-mind. But if you can not only make the functionality an accurate, seamless experience for your visitors and provide recommended solutions based on search terms---well you’ve hit the site search jackpot. 
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Mobile Security Technologies 2015

Tyler Shields

Today, I'm officially kicking off the 2015 version of the Mobile Security Technology Radar and I need your help! 

Mobile security is one of the fastest changing, most dynamic markets that I have ever seen in my life (and I've been around the block a few times). Just when enterprises think they have it all figured out, a new shiny blinking toy is released that promises to secure mobility better than ever before. I began formally tracking the mobile security space for Forrester in the summer of 2013. One of my early reports was the 2013 Mobile Security Technology Radar which I slightly updated in the winter of 2014. Both enterprises and vendors alike responded very positively to these reports, citing the valuable insights that allowed them to predict the movements of a market that changes faster than Katy Perry at the super bowl halftime show.

What isn't always evident in the reports that we write at Forrester is the depth and details in the research we do. For example, the graphic below represents quantified survey results of industry experts, vendors, and customers of mobile device management technologies that offers insite into the market sentiment on MDM solutions in 2013. MDM was a pretty hot technology in the summer of 2013 and the lack of red market sentiment helped us predict that this technology would thrive in the near future (see graphic below). Things really get interesting when we have year over year trending data to help us gain additional insite into the future market movements.

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The Mobile App Gap: Still A Billion Apps Short

Ted Schadler

Think 1.5 million apps is a lot? Pfffft. Netcraft reports 175 million active websites globally. Each one of those sites has many "apps" embedded in it -- one for shopping, one for service, one for each region or product line. I'm guessing we have a global app potential of 1 billion. 

The ancient elders of the web era -- vendors, webmasters, marketers, technology managers, agencies -- all appear to operate under the delusion that if they add responsive web templates to their site, they can make each of those billion experiences a mobile moment. Pfffft. They can't. Responsive web techniques are better than nothing -- at least Google will stop cramming your site to the bottom of the search list. But it's not enough to serve customers in their mobile moments of need.

To do that requires knowing exactly what someone needs, then creating the shortest path from I Want to I Get. And that means nailing the mobile moment.

We know already that people spend more time shopping on their smartphones than on computers. We know already that 70% of the traffic to Walmart.com around Black Friday 2014 came from mobile devices. We know already that 69 million Americans go online more often from smartphones than any other device. [Source: Forrester Research] 

Mobile is not an option. It's your reality. Mobile is as urgent for business customers and employees as for consumers. Here's what one manufacturer had to say: "Our customers look for us when they're installing our equipment in their datacenter. If we're not on their smartphone, then we don't exist." 

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To Be Customer-Obsessed, Firms Must Also Be Technology-Obsessed

Ted Schadler

There is much talk about being customer-obsessed. What does it take to be customer-obsessed?

Recently, in The New Yorker, Mary Powell, CEO of Green Mountain Power, a small energy company in Vermont, told a story of customer-obsession. Her customer-obsession starts simply: Help customers reduce their energy footprint at no net cost. Green Mountain accomplishes this by investing hugely in the latest and best technology, to pull electricity from the sun, insulate the bejesus out of the house, run massively efficient heat pumps, and micro-manage the draw on the power grid draw. Yes, the capital expenses and labor costs are immense. But when you reduce a home's energy footprint by 85%, you reduce the $250 electric bill by 85% -- or more than $25,000 over 10 years.

Green Mountain Power has a customer-obsessed culture and a customer-obsessed operating model. But it also has become expert in using technology to win, serve, and retain customers. The company is technology-obsessed, often out ahead of even the pundits when it comes to the latest technology. Green Mountain Power unites all three forces to be customer-obsessed: culture, operating model, technology.

The same is true for every company and government. Igniting a culture of customer experience is important. Relentlessly improving the operating model to put customers first is also important. But without the right customer-serving business technology in place, customers will be stuck with ancient web sites, cranky mobile apps, pathetic call centers, and disempowered employees.

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Is Zombie Data Taking Over?

Michele Goetz

It is easy to get ahead of ourselves with all the innovation happening with data and analytics. I wouldn't call it hype, as that would imply no value or competency has been achieved. But I would say that what is bright, shiny, and new is always more interesting than the ordinary. 

And, to be frank, there is still a lot of ordinary in our data management world.

In fact, over the past couple of weeks, discussions with companies have uncommonly focused on the ordinary. This in some ways appeared to be unusual because questions focused on the basic foundational aspects of data management and governance — and for companies that I have seen talk publicly about their data management successes.

"Where do I clean the data?"

"How do I get the business to invest in data?"

"How do I get a single customer view of my customer for marketing?"

What this tells me is that companies are under siege by zombie data. 

Data is living in our business under outdated data policies and rules. Data processes and systems are persisting single-purpose data. As data pros turn over application rocks and navigate through the database bogs to centralize data for analytics and virtualize views for new data capabilities, zombie data is lurching out to consume more of the environment, blocking other potential insight to keep the status quo.

The questions you and your data professional cohorts are asking, as illustrated above, are anything but basic. The fact that these foundational building blocks have to be assessed once again demonstrates that organizations are on a path to crush the zombie data siege, democratize data and insight, and advance the business. 

Keep asking basic questions — if you aren't, zombie data will eventually take over, and you and your organization will become part of the walking dead.

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