Hello People, BlackBerry Is The Killer Enterprise Device Today

Ted Schadler

Ted-Schadler by Ted Schadler

Sigh. I guess it was to be expected, but the Apple opinionsphere has been overstating the case for iPhone. Based on the careful research that we did, we do think that iPhone is ready for the enterprise to consider. But that doesn't mean other mobile devices aren't more enterprise-worthy.

And if you you think iPhone case studies are falling out of the trees like acorns in autumn, trust me -- they'renot. It was hard to find three companies willing to talk opening about their iPhone experiences. In fact, it took me almost six months to find those brave souls.

So, let's be clear:

BlackBerry is the dominant mobile device for the enterprise in the US and will be for the foreseeable future. In fact, I wrote about BlackBerry's mobile collaboration platformlast fall. BlackBerry is a great platform for mobile collaboration because of its security, network, manageability, form factor choice, global carrier support, ISV experience, and superior messaging capabilities.

We hear from many Forrester clients that they would have to pry BlackBerrys out of the "cold dead fingers" of their employees. That says something about how important that device is to productivity.

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The Business Case For A Business Case

Natalie L. Petouhoff, Ph.D. By Dr. Natalie Petouhoff

In covering Customer Service, I have divided the topic into three aspects:

  • “Get the Basics Right”
  • “Understand the Business of Customer Service"
  • “Plan for the Future of Customer Service.”

I just published a document, “How To Win Funding For Your Customer Service Project." Forrester suggests to standardize the process and template for a business case. We use the discipline Total Economic Impact™ to calculate the ROI for an initiative. I’m hearing from a lot of my clients that in order to get their project approved, they need to justify it.

Today I had an inquiry call from a vendor that wanted to know how best to standardize the business justification process. They are finding that they can’t even get a meeting, or if they do, then one of the first sales objections of their clients is, “What is the ROI of this solution?"

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Making iPhone Work In The Enterprise

Ted Schadler

by Ted Schadler

If you had asked me three years ago whether the mobile industry would become a free-for-all of innovation and opportunity, I would have been forced to sigh and say, "can't see how -- the carriers don't seem interested in unlocking that potential."

I would certainly have been wrong as Apple has so impressively shown with its iPhone strategy (with first AT&T's and now 100s of carrier's support).

After 21 months in market, it's quite clear that Apple is redefining its third industry: first the computer industry, next the music industry, and now the mobile industry. With 25,000 applications (yes, mostly consumer applications today) available on Apple's private store and a reported 800,000,000 downloads, the iPhone has become a new platform for innovation.

At least one major enterprise vendor -- Cisco -- now treats the iPhone ahead of BlackBerry devices as a tier one device, at least as demonstrated by its WebEx and Cisco Call Manager applications.

But enterprises have been slow to adopt the product because of legitimate security and manageability concerns. Perhaps no longer. We found three enterprises willing to talk about their support of iPhone:

  1. Kraft Foods uses iPhone support to signal new suipport for employee culture change. Adding 400 more iPhones a month, on track for 4,000 iPhones by year end.

  2. Oracle Corporation responds to employee demand for iPhones. 4,000 iPhones globally and counting.

  3. An IT senior director at a California-based pharmaceutical company makes iPhone a priority. January 2009 launch, adding 100+ iPhones a month.

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When Were You (Happily) Surprised By Customer Service?

New Security and Risk Podcast - The GRC Technology Puzzle

Chris McClean

It’s bad enough when your boss puts you on the spot about a recent project you’ve finished...it’s even more interesting when that conversation is recorded for the general public.

Listen to Research Director Rob Whiteley interview me about one of my recent reports in our new podcast, The GRC Technology Puzzle: Getting All The Pieces To Fit.

For those of you interested in why analysts write the reports they do and how they might have done things differently, our podcasts provide a behind-the-scenes look at what customer conversations, market trends, and other issues motivate our research.

This report specifically tackles the increasingly complicated GRC technology landscape, a market segment that includes literally hundreds of vendors vying for their share of corporate budgets. The highlight is a graphic that illustrates the different categories of technology available on the market and the distinct role they play in a broad GRC program.

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Healthcare Industry BI Groundhog Day

Boris Evelson

Boris Evelson By Boris Evelson

I am writing this blog on my way back home from www.himss.org show in Chicago, while a tingly chill crawls down my back. It’s a creepy feeling of déjà vu. Even worse, it feels like the movie Groundhog Day where the main character keeps waking up on the same day, same date, never able to get to tomorrow. Everything he was able to achieve during the day is erased, and he has to do it over, and over, and over again. This was the feeling I got as I walked the show floor and kept asking myself questions such as:

  • Where are the open technology standards?
  • Where is the transparency?
  • Where is the common sense that business requirements, not vendors, dictate the rules?
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Is a CMDB even possible?

Glenn O'Donnell

Glenn O'Donnell This is one of the most frequently asked questions I get in my many interactions with people on the topic of CMDB. The short answer is, “A CMS is possible, but the common model of CMDB is not.” I have even been challenged on Twitter that CMDB is nothing more than an endless time sink (follow glennodonnell to see the threads). Sadly, this is a common perception that is fueled by the many failures resulting from an unrealistic view of CMDB as a monolithic database.

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Obama Gave The Queen An iPod — This Matters To HR, Why?

What would you do if you knew your network only had a week to live?

John Kindervag

Crank-defib 
 

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Green IT, ECM, And Natural Capitalism

Craig Le Clair

I recently gave a speech in late February on the above subject at the 14th AIIM ATM Executive Summit Agenda and have another one at a Department of Energy Conference April 9th. Two main themes hit home to me for how ECM can make us more green. Reducing paper in the office and increasing adoption of customer-facing transaction documents or E-transactions top my list. I will blog on E-transactions and our woeful adoption rates later — as the two subjects are quite different. Reducing paper in the office is being helped and will be led by the red-hot Managed Print Services (MPS) area. MPS finally made the mainstream press the other day as The Wall Street Journal article below will attest: Xerox Tries to Go Beyond Copiers’

If your organization is like most, printers, fax machines, and scanners seem to multiply magically without human intervention. Although companies often don't count the cost, the amount of money spent servicing such equipment that is aging or underutilized is astounding as well as environmentally taxing. By eliminating redundant or dated equipment, installing multifunction peripherals (MFPs) to replace single-purpose devices, and implementing central management and accountability, we all can become heroes, and help push green IT forward.

Office devices, for example, are quiet energy gluttons. A copier, two printers, and a fax machine consume 1,400 kWh of energy each year. But one MFP that performs all the same functions uses only 700 kWh annually. Multiply these savings across all of your company devices — assuming you know what that number is — and this is the energy you are wasting each year. More efficient MFPs should be a part of the plan.

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