Questions From The Next-Gen EA Teleconference On October 23, 2009

Gene Leganza

Questions From The Next-Gen EA Teleconference On October 23, 2009

Jeff Scott and I presented a teleconference entitled “Next-Generation Enterprise Architecture” last week. It was a lively session with a lot of material on our side and a lot of questions from attendees. We focused on the questions over the phone in the live session and decided it was best to handle the written questions that came in via the Webex chat in a blog post.

Two closely related questions kick things off:

Read more

Boomer Retirement And IT - Are You An Ostrich, Chicken-little, Or an Owl?

Phil Murphy

The rock-band R.E.M. sang a song about the "end of the world as we know it" and to hear some people talk - the end is near! 

The Chicken-littles of the world would have us believe that retiring Baby Boomers will wreak untold havoc. Half the world's population will suddenly disappear from the workforce - collapsing world markets, straining national pension systems to the breaking point, and burdening younger generations with unmanageable national debt.

Other folks are at the opposite end of the spectrum - they're in denial, like ostriches with their heads deep in the sand - if they don't look at how bad the problem is, it can't hurt them, right? No staffing problems here - look we can still hire people, let's deal with today's problems and not go looking for tomorrow's troubles!

Read more

Telepresence Jumpstarts Video Collaboration

Claire Schooley

Claire-Schooley By Claire Schooley

Telepresence is the life-size, true color, no latency video meeting technology that creates a “wow” reaction from participants, especially those who have experienced some traditional videoconferencing that gave poor picture quality, out-of synch audio/video, and added no sense of presence to a meeting.  Here are some factors that make telepresence different:

  • Video provides high quality 1080p pictures with hidden cameras placed to achieve eye contact no matter where people are seated around the conference table.
  • Audio is full duplex with microphones and speakers that allow sound to come from the direction of the speaker.
  • The environment is purpose-built with lighting arrays, speakers, and cameras all configured for the optimum experience.  Conference tables, chairs, and even the wall paint are the same at all sites to convey a uniform sense of presence.
  • Managed service and support assure that this expensive system is going to work. Many organizations buy a concierge-type service model so participants just need to push a button to start the videoconference.
Read more

Telepresence Jumpstarts Video Collaboration

Claire Schooley

Claire-SchooleyBy Claire Schooley

Telepresence is the life-size, true color, no latency video meeting technology that creates a “wow” reaction from participants, especially those who have experienced some traditional videoconferencing that gave poor picture quality, out-of synch audio/video, and added no sense of presence to a meeting.  Here are some factors that make telepresence different:

• Video provides high quality 1080p pictures with hidden cameras placed to achieve eye contact no matter where people are seated around the conference table.
• Audio is full duplex with microphones and speakers that allow sound to come from the direction of the speaker.
• The environment is purpose-built with lighting arrays, speakers, and cameras all configured for the optimum experience.  Conference tables, chairs, and even the wall paint are the same at all sites to convey a uniform sense of presence. Managed service and support assure that this expensive system is going to work. Many organizations buy a concierge-type service model so participants just need to push a button to start the videoconference.

Read more

Categories:

Is application consolidation keeping you up at night?

Phil Murphy

Murphy_p_small I've written a lot of research around the topic of application portfolio management (APM), and how the tools are slowly maturing from their application mining roots. Although the process of APM applies equally across packaged and custom-appls, the mining tools, until recently anyway, have excluded packaged applications.

Our application development team recently expanded with some new colleagues, and one of the topics a new colleague - George Lawrie - and I intend to take on as a joint effort is application consolidation across custom and packaged applications.

We'd like to know - how important is this topic to you - what are the nuances of it that keep you awake at night, or is it a non-issue? If it is a non-issue, why? Have you done such a good job of staving off redundant and obsolete technology, or is it someone else's responsibility? Please chime in, we'd love to hear about your application environments.

What recent acquisitions mean to SAP?

Holger Kisker

Dali-elephantsHow Many Legs Does An Elephant Need?

 

While Oracle’s acquisition of Sun Microsystems is still pending there has been a lot of speculation about which IT giant will take the next big acquisition step in response.

 

Is there a rule of cause & effect that fuels the spiral of acquisitions?

 

·         Know your enemy and know yourself

Read more

Are big companies in big cities different in emerging markets?

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Jennifer Bélissent [Posted by Jennifer Bélissent]

In a recent discussion with execs at Intel about how to position netbooks into emerging market, someone raised the question about how different technology buyers in metro areas in emerging markets are from those in mature markets.  Are tech buyers in the Tier 1 cities in China — Shanghai, for example — any different from those in New York, London, or Paris?  I was reminded of this discussion when reading one of Mark Beckford’s Disruptive Leadership blog entries, “10 Things You Must Do To Win in Emerging Markets”.

Mark looks at Shanghai and says that it is more like New York and Paris than like rural parts of China.  In my new blog entry at B2B Beyond Borders, I examine this claim and the how different economic drivers influence purchases in different markets and regions.  I encourage you to give it a read.

Business Rules Technology Belongs In Your Architecture

Mike Gualtieri

Mike_Gualtieri_ForresterCheckmate! You're Toast.

Those are words you don't want to hear when playing chess. Similarly, you don't want to be checkmated in the rough and tumble of the business real world.

To win at chess and in business to you have to make smart decisions constantly and consistently - decisions that are guided by a carefully crafted strategy designed to checkmate your opponent or, at a minimum, to stay in the game. Deciding what moves to make in chess is hard enough even though it is just you and your opponent. The decisions businesses have to make everyday can be much more complicated and the stakes are much higher.

Read more

Categories:

Videoconferencing Heats Up

Claire Schooley

by Claire Schooley and Ted Schadler

This podcast cover's Cisco's recent acquisition of Tandberg and what it means for Cisco moving forward. The podcast also covers different forms of Web conferencing from Telepresence to single computer HD conferencing. The podcast concludes with expectations for the market and advice for companies who are considering video conferencing.

http://a964.g.akamaitech.net/f/964/714/1h/www.forrester.com/role_based/images/author/imported/forresterDotCom/Podcasts/IKM/Claire%20Schooley_Ted%20Schadler_Videoconferencing_Heats_Up.mp3

Categories:

2009-2010 Forrester And Disaster Recovery Journal Survey

Stephanie Balaouras

Stephanie Balaouras

Two years ago, Forrester and the Disaster Recovery Journal partnered together to field surveys on a pair of pressing topics in Risk Management: Business Continuity (BC) and Disaster Recovery (DR). The surveys help highlight trends in the industry and to provide organizations with some statistical data for peer comparison. The partnership has been a huge success. In 2007, we examined the state of disaster recovery preparedness, in 2008, we examined the state of business continuity preparedness and this year, we examine the state of crisis communications and the interplay between enterprise risk management and business continuity.

We decided to focus on crisis communications because as last year’s study revealed, one of the lessons learned from organizations who had invoked a business continuity plan (BCP) was that they had greatly underestimated the importance and difficulty of communication and collaboration within and without the organization. In any situation, a natural disaster, a power outage, a security incident or even a corporate scandal, crisis communication is critical to responding quickly, managing the response and returning to normal operations.

Organizations approach crisis communication differently. In some organizations, crisis communications is a separate team that works together with BC/DR planning teams to embed communication strategies into BCPs/DRPs and in other companies, BC/DR planning teams do its best to address crisis communication.

Read more