Singapore CIOs Look Beyond IT To Enable Digital Transformation

Fred Giron

I cannot believe it’s been a month already since the Forrester CIO Summit took place in Singapore. As usual, it was a great forum to exchange views with you, Singapore-based and other regional technology management leaders, on what is keeping CIOs busy these days: the digital transformation of their enterprises. Following these exchanges and my recent discussions with CIOs in Singapore and beyond, it is clear you understand that:

  • The power has shifted into the hands of your customers. Dane Anderson kicked off the Summit by making the case that the balance of power has shifted from institutions to always connected and technology empowered customers. To remain relevant as CIOs to your business stakeholders, you must shift your focus from the design and deployment of internal systems focused on process control to enabling digital products and services for more effectively engaging your customers.
  • The future of business is digital. My colleague John Brand then explained what makes a digital business. Companies like Alibaba and Burberry are digital businesses because they excel at integrating the two sides of digital strategy: creating leading digital customer experiences AND agile digital operations in service of customers.
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The US Federal Digital Services Playbook

Nigel Fenwick

Last month I wrote a short blog post introducing the new US Digital Services Playbook. I'm happy to announce that we're going to be publishing a series of short reports that take a closer look at the CIO's role in implementing the plays in the playbook.

The first of these client briefs, published today, summarizes why we believe CIOs should study the playbook and incorporate its plays into their team's standard operating practices.

The remaining briefs will take each of the four play categories and drill down into the implications for the CIO and their teams.

The US digital services playbook's thirteen plays

Windows Server 2003 – A Very Unglamorous But Really Important Problem, Waiting To Bite

Richard Fichera

Very much in the shadows of all the press coverage and hysteria attendant on emerging cloud architectures and customer-facing systems of engagement are the nitty-gritty operational details that lurk like monsters in the swamp of legacy infrastructure, and some of them have teeth. And sometimes these teeth can really take a bite out of the posterior of an unprepared organization.

One of those toothy animals that I&O groups are increasingly encountering in their landscapes is the problem of what to do with Windows Server 2003 (WS2003). It turns out there are still approximately 11 million WS2003 systems running today, with another 10+ million instances running as VM guests. Overall, possibly more than 22 million OS images and a ton of hardware that will need replacing and upgrading. And increasing numbers of organizations have finally begun to take seriously the fact that Microsoft is really going to end support and updates as of July 2015.

Based on the conversations I have been having with our clients, the typical I&O group that is now scrambling to come up with a plan has not been willfully negligent, nor are they stupid. Usually WS2003 servers are legacy servers, quietly running some mature piece of code, often in satellite locations or in the shops of acquired companies. The workloads are a mix of ISV and bespoke code, but it is often a LOB-specific application, with the run-of-the-mill collaboration, infrastructure servers and, etc. having long since migrated to newer platforms. A surprising number of clients have told me that they have identified the servers, but not always the applications or the business owners – often a complex task for an old resource in a large company.

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2014 Enterprise Architecture Award Winners – Wow!

Alex Cullen

I have never put ‘Wow’ into the title of a blog before – but for this one it’s fully justified. 

This is the fifth year InfoWorld, Penn State University Center for EA, and Forrester have run the annual Enterprise Architecture Awards. When I compare the winners of five years ago – all excellent EA programs, with this year’s winners and the runner-ups, all I can say is ‘Wow – EA is really advancing’. 

I am pleased to announce the winners of the 2014 Enterprise Architecture Awards.  This year, we have six winning programs – all of which demonstrate leading edge thinking on how they engage with their business, how they provide value, and how they help their business achieve its strategic goals. Here are the winners, selected by a panel of leading EA practitioners drawn previous years’ winners and other excellent programs.  (For a more extensive write-up, see the InfoWorld report)

Allstate Insurance

Driving Innovation with Enterprise Architecture

The best way to succeed in Property and Casualty insurance in the US market is to create innovative products and services for unique customer segments, each with a customized customer value proposition. This is the need that Doug Safford, Vice President and Chief Architect pivoted his EA program towards. 

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Consumer Engagement Is Shifting Toward Micro Moments

Jeffrey Hammond

Happy iPhone 6 day. If you're reading this you're proabably not standing in line hoping to get your hands on Apple's latest devices. My colleague Mike Facemire drove past the local Apple store in Back Bay last night at 1 A.M. on the way home from Logan airport and described the scene as "nuts". The line was completely around the block, in 40 degree weather no less.

Developers should pay attention, as there's more going on here than hipsters queuing for the latest shiny. Today Mike, Julie Ask, and yours truly published a research note for eBusiness professionals detailing the top ten ways to leverage Apple’s new tech. Central to our argument is that iOS 8 takes many steps to break down the barriers between custom 3rd party apps and Apple's mobile platform. Mobile developers used to be constrained to their own secure, sand-boxed containers with minimal access to sensors on the device and local storage, but separated from other custom apps. As a result, we saw development teams gradually move toward "least common denomiator" apps that saved money by using a common code base.

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The CIO, CMO, And Digital Leadership

Nigel Fenwick

digital business demands a healthy CMO CIO partnershipThe 2014 CMO/CIO Survey in conjunction with Forbes offers an opportunity for your voice to be heard in our research.

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The Great Race to Develop a Digital Experience Delivery Backbone

Stephen Powers

“A unified platform for content, community and commerce.”

“A complete set of integrated solutions helps you maximize and measure your impact in more ways than ever before.”

“Everything you need to deliver unique and personal customer experiences.”

Unified. Complete. Everything you need. These quotes are pulled directly from the marketing materials of some of the biggest players in the digital experience delivery space. One piece of software that addresses all of your company’s needs in delivering top-of-the-line customer experience. Sound too good to be true?

Yeah. We thought so too.

Vendors are piecing together discrete capabilities to form what we at Forrester call digital experience delivery platforms, which aim to manage, deliver, measure, and optimize experiences consistently across every digital touchpoint. Vendors from content, commerce, and marketing backgrounds are playing in this space, and Forrester clients increasingly mention them together when considering a vendor to act as their delivery backbone (a year ago, we certainly wouldn’t have heard IBM and hybris mentioned in the same inquiry for non-transactional needs, as we did recently).

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Global Vendors Should Accelerate Their Partnerships In China

Charlie Dai

It's never been as challenging for global companies in China as it is right now. First, we've seen a continuous stream of news about the Chinese government requiring greater regulatory governance, starting with the cybersecurity vetting of IT products that relate to national security and public interests in May. Second, leading Chinese Internet companies equipped with emerging technology, such as Alibaba, Baidu, and Tencent, are engaging consumers with enriched products and services, expanding into the enterprise business via innovative business models, and extending their reach from tier-one and tier-two cities to tier-three to tier-six ones.

To gain extensive geographic and vertical coverage in the huge market that is China, vendors have had to engage with partner ecosystems for business operations. Now, it’s even more critical for multinational corporations to enable their local alliances to overcome these disruptions and achieve mutually beneficial strategic business growth. Some vendors have already started doing so, with IBM being a leading example. Its initiatives include:

  • Launching a strategic partnership with Yonyou. On September 13, 2014, IBM announced the start of its strategic cooperation with Yonyou during the latter's 2014 user conference. IBM will optimize DB2 with BLU Acceleration for various Yonyou products, such as NC (Yonyou’s ERP offering) and its supply chain management, customer relationship management, and human resources management products. In return, Yonyou will offer NC on top of DB2 with BLU acceleration to its customers, based on its evaluation of IBM’s product in June 2013.
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Sitecore v.8’s Walls Are Being Built On v.7.5’s Data Foundation

Mark Grannan

At Sitecore’s annual Symposium event last week, CEO Michael Seifert opened the show with a story about a splash of paint and small town in Tuscany -- a Jackson Pollock splash of paint and the town where he proposed to his wife to be exact.  Fast-forward a few minutes and Seifert revealed the plot: tying his knowledge of his future wife’s love of Jackson Pollock with the context of how he fumbled (and then recovered) his marriage proposal, she agreed to marry him.  He told this story to deliver his message of ‘experience marketing’: the more you know about someone and the context they’re in, the better your chances to dynamically respond to and refine the experiences that will resonate with them. 

While nay-sayers might comment that this strategy feels like a ‘me too’ to Adobe’s Marketing Cloud announcements from the past few years, the specific features were getting a healthy amount of excitement from the audience because they saw momentum.  Specifically, momentum built on v.7.5’s  MongoDB "Experience Database" foundations released in July.  These foundations will be put to good use to help v.8 deliver new features later this year or early 2015 around customer data and content testing/ optimization:

  • Unified experience profile includes visualization across the customer’s interactions over their entire relationship timeline.  All data in profile is (or will be) fully extensible and you can personalize against it.
  • Federated Experience Manager' tracks data on non-Sitecore sites via a JavaScript layer -- and can inject personalized content there too.
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Not “Smart” But Efficient: Schneider Electric Helps Cities Achieve Realistic Goals

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

My sister used to tell me that I wasn’t smart I was just organized.  I’m not here to argue (anymore) but I have never forgotten her claim. In fact, it’s true for more than just me.  It’s really what is at the heart of smart cities. It’s not about what you know but what you can do with it. The industry has been pushing “smart” on cities for a half a decade.  But the most successful stories about cities cutting their cost of operations and improving the lives of their citizens are about being better organized or more efficient. 

At the Schneider Electric Influencer Summit in Boston this week, Schneider execs and customers focused their smart city story on just that – getting more efficient. We all have heard the numbers: cities take up only 2% of the world’s surface but they consume 75% of the world’s energy and account for 80% of the world’s carbon emissions.  As the Schneider CMO cited, “If left unchecked, our appetite for energy will grow 50% by 2040.” And there is significant room for greater efficiency. The sweet spot for Schneider in this Next Age of Change is in helping cities control their public energy consumption.  While their vision  – and “marketecture stack”  – extends into water and other domains, they plan to establish their footprint with energy efficiency.  Phew! That’s a refreshing change from vendors who want to do it all.

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