Microsoft and Dell Change the Private/Hybrid Cloud Game with On-Premise Azure

Richard Fichera

What was announced?

On October 20 at TechEd, Microsoft quietly slipped in what looks like a potential game-changing announcement in the private/hybrid cloud world when they rolled out Microsoft Cloud Platform System (CPS), an integrated hardware/software system that combines an Azure-consistent on premise cloud with an optimized hardware stack from Dell.

Why does it matter?

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Salesforce.com And Risk Analytics – They May Soon Be A Vendor To Watch?

Nick Hayes

Last week Salesforce.com (SFDC) hosted its annual Dreamforce Conference in San Francisco, and for the first time, the cloud giant’s products could soon have some major implications in the governance, risk, and compliance (GRC) market.

Amidst the chaos of keynotes, partner sessions, guest speakers like Hilary Clinton, wil.i.am, Al Gore, and our very own George Colony, two of SFDC’s major announcements demonstrated how its new offerings and future strategy will position the company to compete in the very big business intelligence market:

  1. SFDC plans to grow from $5.4 billion to $20 billion by competing more directly with BI vendors like SAP
  2. SFDC announced its "Wave" Analytics Cloud offering, which helps deliver dashboards and analytics from any data source in its platform.
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Right Size Your CRM To Your Needs

Kate Leggett

CRM solutions have been on the market for a long time. The first products were introduced over two decades ago, and many features are commoditized. New vendors are continually pushing the envelope on CRM capabilities and exploring the “white space” of capabilities that are not necessarily core to CRM. Old stalwarts are working on capabilities that differentiate them from others - like verticalized offerings, offerings tuned to to mobile user, offerings tuned to a certain size or complexity of organization.

CRM buyers need to remember that more capabilities these days is not better; more is simply more. In fact, when you don't need — or perhaps can't use — extra functionality, more is sometimes worse. Small businesses — and small customer-facing teams in larger enterprises — need to carefully evaluate vendors that they are evaluating in order to pick a solution that is right-sized for their needs. Categories and criteria that should be closely evaluated include:

  • Ease of use. Our research finds that 58% of employees interface directly or indirectly with customers. Small customer-facing teams don't have the luxury of deeply configuring or customizing CRM user experiences. Make sure the user experiences that come "out-of'the-box" from your CRM vendor are highly intuitive; that they work on the devices and platforms that your team use; and that they don't impede your productivity in any way.  
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Grading Our 2014 Cloud Predictions

James Staten

This time last year, we published our predictions of what would be the major events and changes in enterprise cloud adoption in 2014. In this post, we look back on these prognostications to see which came true, which are still pending and which missed the mark. Look for our 2015 Cloud Predictions in the next few weeks. Thanks to Dave Bartoletti, Ed Ferrara and the rest of the Cloud Playbook team for their contributions.

So how did we do on our predictions in fall 2013:

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Amazon Web Services Announces Cloud Active Directory

Andras Cser

As we predicted in May 2012, user directories are moving into the cloud. Cloud workloads require that users who are authorized to access them are stored near the cloud workload and not just on-premises. While this offering announced now by AWS is not necessary technically groundbreaking (Cloud IAM vendors and Microsoft Azure have been offering AD integration for a relatively long time), obviously this announcement is relevant because of AWS's broad presence in IaaS. We urge Forrester's clients that plan to use AWS AD service to ask AWS the following questions:

1. What safeguards are there to protect information (user, computer, etc.) in AWS AD?

2. How does AWS integrate in real time with on-premises AD and shared folder infrastructures?

3. What types of true identity management (access governance and provisioning) services does AWS offer to complement this new AD service?

 

Check AWS's blog entry at http://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/new-aws-directory-service/ for more details.

Docker Will Live Up To The Hype And Containers Will Rule The Cloud. Here's What You Need To Know.

Dave Bartoletti

I've been on the road all month talking about business technology speed. The age of the customer is all about speed. Faster time to market, more frequent software releases, automated server deployments, instant cloud scaling…anything that removes friction from the app dev process is hot as we move into 2015.

Docker, the container management juggernaut, has generated some of the most breathless buzz in cloud-land this year. And for once, all the buzz is justified, for a few reasons. Docker's new, but containers are not. Docker makes containers easier to use, so more companies can get the benefits some of the big cloud providers already enjoy. Those include near-instantaneous app launch, rapid scale-out, and server efficiencies much better than traditional virtualization. 

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Why Did HP Buy Eucalyptus?

Dave Bartoletti

Were you surprised by HP's decision to acquire Eucalyptus last month? You weren't alone. HP's move to snap up one of the first open source cloud platform projects left many scratching their heads, especially since Eucalyptus had lost much of its momentum in the last 5 years. 

Now that OpenStack has effectively won the battle to be the open source alternative to Amazon Web Services, why would HP, already a major contributor to and vendor of a public cloud platform built on OpenStack, want Eucalyptus? It's not the technology. We think the value lies in the company's AWS API experience, Marten Mickos' open source credibility, and the depth of engineering skill.

Check out Lauren Nelson's, James Staten's, and my take on what this acquisition means for both HP and Eucalyptus -- and what it means for their mutual customers and potential customers.

Benchmark Your Cloud Adoption Today. Don't Fall Behind Your Peers.

Dave Bartoletti

Are you ahead of the cloud curve or falling behind your peers?

We are definitely in the hypergrowth phase of cloud computing, and 2015 will be a critical year: spending will jump, platforms will mature and consolidate, and cloud will enter the formal IT portfolio, whether IT likes it or not. Where are you on your journey to cloud?

Check out our Benchmark Your Enterprise Cloud Adoption report, published by my colleague Sophia Vargas and me a few weeks ago. Inside, you'll find selected data from Forrester's Business Technographics surveys that shine light on:

  • The rate of growth for the public cloud market;
  • Where cloud is on enterprise CIO priority lists;
  • How much spending is shifting to cloud, and for which workloads;
  • Which cloud types - public, private, hosted private - are preferred by which buyers;
  • The rate of SaaS solution uptake;
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2014 US Colocation Market: Mature, Competitive, Expanding

Sophia Vargas

Over the last decade, the colocation market has expanded and flourished – with more customers looking to outsource new facilities and more vendors emerging and expanding to meet this demand.

Colocation providers now offer a myriad of services beyond the expected physical space. Infrastructure is now table stakes, including enhanced power efficiency and physical security. The more impressive solutions offer a full portfolio of managed services to cloud, or host and steward a marketplace of third party services, offering close proximity to business partners and primary communications services. By “close” we mean VERY close, as in the same building, sometimes only meters away. Depending on the use case, proximity like this can make the difference between success or failure of a business function – financial trading is an obvious example but there are many more.

To get better acquainted with this ever expanding landscape of vendors and solutions, about this time last year I began a lengthy exercise to investigate and analyze the US colocation market.  After three months, I identified 430 organizations through search engines and public profile sites. I then weeded out 112 firms that had inactive websites, were acquired, or did not clearly provide retail or wholesale colocation. Over the subsequent 3 months, I attempted to quantify the footprint of all qualifying facilities. Some key findings from this research include:

  • There are over 1430 data center facilities in more than 330 cities across the US, but53% of vendors surveyed operated only 1 facility.
  • There is over 68 million square feet of reported data center space, and an estimated 90-120 million square feet in total. This projection includes a fair amount of assumptions as many vendors did not provide facility sizes.
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US Tech Market Will Rise By Around 6% In 2014 And 2015, Led By Software And Services In Support Of The BT Agenda