Government CIOs and CMOs Unite! Governments Must Embrace The "Marketing" Function

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Here at Forrester we are busy planning our upcoming Forum for CIOs and CMOs.  With a theme of “Building A Customer-Obsessed Enterprise” the event explores the partnership between marketing and technology leaders. But what about our government clients?  The role of marketing is associated with the private sector. Companies employ marketers to identify their target markets and the opportunities for providing goods and services to them. Public-sector organizations don't typically have the luxury of  choosing their target market or their products and services. Or at least that’s what most organizations think. But even if that is the case, it doesn't mean that these organizations shouldn't get to know their "customers" and understand how best to meet their needs. While the service might be prescribed by legislation or regulation, public organizations can influence the customer experience, and the rising focus on citizen engagement mandates they do so.

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Analyst Spotlight Podcast With Renee Murphy

Stephanie Balaouras

Each month we use our newsletter and a podcast to highlight one of the many talented and hardworking analysts and researchers on Forrester's Security & Risk team. If you're not signed up for our newsletters, I highly encourage you to do so; please email srfl@forrester.com for additional details. In the meantime, click below to listen to our analyst spotlight on senior analyst Renee Murphy, one of our leading analysts on governance, risk, and compliance. You'll hear some great insights from Renee on clients' top challenges and requirements, surprising research findings, and upcoming research and vendors to watch. To download the MP3 version of the podcast, please click here

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From Intel Developer Forum – New Xeon E5 v3 Promises A Respite For Capacity Planners

Richard Fichera

I'm at IDF, a major geekfest for the people interested in the guts of today’s computing infrastructure, and will be immersing myself in the flow for a couple of days. Before going completely off the deep end, I wanted to call out the announcement of the new Xeon E5. While I’ve discussed it in more depth in an accompanying Quick Take just published on our main website, I wanted to add some additional comments on its implications for data center operations, particularly in the areas of capacity planning and long-term capital budgeting.

For many years, each successive iteration of Intel’s and partners’ roadmaps has been quietly delivering a major benefit that seldom gets top billing – additional capacity within the same power and physical footprint, and the resulting ability for users from small enterprises to mega-scale service providers, to defer additional data spending capital expense.

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WLAN Vendors Differentiate By Business Value And Market Focus, Not Technology

Andre Kindness

Forrester brought the wireless Forrester Wave™ back from the grave after an end-of-life announcement of it in 2007. Too many wireless innovations and changes in the vendor landscape have emerged not to dig it up and examine today’s solutions. The Forrester Wave: Wireless Local Area Network Solutions evaluated 10 wireless systems — Aerohive Solution, Aruba Mobility-Defined Networks, Cisco Aironet, Cisco Meraki, Fortinet Secure Wireless LAN, HP FlexNetwork WLAN, Meru Networks WLAN, Motorola Solutions WLAN,Ruckus Smart Wi-Fi products, and Xirrus Wireless— using 300 criteria asked in 58 questions . Besides the photo finish at the top, the wireless Forrester Wave reinforced what we were seeing and the reasons why the Forrester Wave needed to be resurrected:

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Quality, Trusted, Fit for Purpose Data?

Michele Goetz

Often lagging in priorities when it comes to data strategy, it appears that data quality is coming back in favor. As organizations expand beyond data exploration and discovery to putting real action in place organization wide based on these insights, the risk of getting the answer wrong or having dirty data is higher.  

But, this may be anecdotal supposition, even in light of the wide conversations I've had with clients.   What we do know quantitatively is:

1) Data quality is the most important topic for information governance according to our recent Business Technographics research for data and analytics.  In fact,

2) We see an uptick in data quality inquiries from last year.  

3) Vendors are introducing data preparation tools that infuse data quality and governance into analytic and BI processes

Anecdotal evidence and quantiative evidence leads me to the thought that there is a bigger shift happening in how we think about data quality, how we act upon it, and what doing so does for our buisnesses.  When things are a-changing it always make my brain itch to get more data, more stories, and more evidence.  And, while I'm curious, I'm assuming you are too. It is great to see that something in influencing change - and we want to know what that is in order to determine if we too need to change.  However, what is more important is what are organizations doing and which are standing out in terms of success and improved ways of thinking and execution?  In the end, do we need to write a new playbook* for data quality?  Has the bar been reset and we need to rebenchmark?

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S&R Pros: Use The Mobile Mind Shift And Consumer Tools To Drive The Privacy Discussion

Heidi Shey

The mobile mind shift: what is it? Forrester defines the mobile mind shift as the expectation that any desired information or service is available, on any appropriate device, in context, at a person's moment of need. It’s the reality that your customers (and employees!) live in today, where mobility isn’t just about devices or apps anymore but more about a change in attitude (e.g., individuals don’t just expect the availability of information/services, they demand it). With this mind shift comes a few other attitude shifts, notably around privacy and security of personal information and devices. In our 2013 surveys, Forrester saw that:

  • Given a choice of how to address security concerns on the devices they use for work, 38% of North American and European information workers prefer to do it themselves, while 20% would take action based on guidance from their employer.
  • When doing things online, 59% of US consumers are concerned about identity theft, 33% do not want their information permanently recorded and accessible to others, and 22% are concerned that their data will be sold to another company. 
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What Qualities Do Great Enterprise Application Developers Possess?

Mike Gualtieri

What are you doing on October 16th and 17th? That's when Forrester's Forum for Application Development & Delivery Professionals will be held in Chicago. Join us this year for lively session, networking, and discussions about building software that powers your business. The agenda is hot including a session from me on The Unstoppable Momentum Of Hadoop and guest speaker from McDonald's on How McDonald's Plans To Leverage Its New Digital Platform To Revolutionaize Customer Experiences.

We have lots of fun at these events too. Check out this video of last year's event where we grabbed both clients and analysts and asked them an important, and to some, philosophical question: What Makes A Great Application Developer? See if you'd answer the same way.

E-Delivery Adoption Despite Mobile Mind Shift Is Still Abysmal

Craig Le Clair

 

During the internet bubble of 2000, many of us predicted E-delivery of business content would reach a 40% to 50% adoption within a few years. Here we are now almost 15 years later and it still hovers around 20%. How can this still be true in 2014? Enterprises want print to become a secondary channel because it's less expensive. They form committees to ensure output from core systems is consistent, compliant, and adds to the customer experience. Stymied by low adoption rates — except in specific demographics, such as online brokerage and banking — many enterprises have lost enthusiasm for aggressively prioritizing digital adoption. And it's hard to blame them.

Unfortunately, we are the problem. We do not link paper usage with carbon contribution, don't trust our institutions, or are just are afraid of missing a payment unless the bill lands in the mailbox. Despite the plethora of smart devices, pervasive video, and social media that allow us to interact easily with customer service agents, pass information digitally, and complete business transactions on-the-run, we still hold on to paper delivery. I discuss the reasons for this here and what firms can do about it.

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Apple's iWatch Will Impact Workforce Enablement And Customer Interactions

JP Gownder

Tomorrow, Apple will reportedly unveil its wearable device, widely dubbed "iWatch" (though we don't yet know for certain what Apple will actually call the device). I'll be at the event in person along with a number of Forrester analysts. In advance of the event, my colleague James McQuivey and I have released two new reports -- one targeted at CMOs and one targeted at I&O professionals -- to preview what we think this release will mean. 

We've been thinking about the ramifications for several months, though we held the report until right before the event. I've been writing about wearables for well over a year, and back in February I authored a column for ComputerWorld in which I laid out what we would hope to see in the perfect smartwatch. Some of the elements of a perfect smartwatch I emphasized then were:

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Five Insights From Digital Business Leaders In Asia Pacific

Dane Anderson

I had the good fortune of moderating a panel on the state of digital business at the Chief Digital Officer Global Forum in Singapore yesterday morning. The event showcased a who’s who of digital business leadership in the region, including my panelists Veena Ramesh of Johnson & Johnson, Jerry Blanton of Citi, and Veronique Meffert of Great Eastern Life.

The event paralleled many of the themes my colleague Clement Teo highlighted in his recent report on the State of Digital Business in Asia Pacific. Five key themes that I believe provide important insights on the pulse of digital business regionally:

  • Organizational issues are the greatest hurdle. There was not a single dissenting voice on the fact that organizational challenges represent the biggest impediment to digital business progress. The greatest organizational challenges are functional silos, business unit resistance, a lack of clear guidance from the CEO, rigid backward-looking mindsets, and a shortage of the skills needed to drive change. One approach — shared by Rahul Welde of Unilever — is to drive “digital experimentation funds” and “foundries” to drive co-creation innovation.
  • Media command centers are becoming critical marketing assets. Both representatives from Unilever and Philips spoke of the critical role that media command centers now play in their marketing campaigns. In the case of Philips, I was surprised to learn that its social media command center in Singapore employs 200 people — and that it is planning for expansion!
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