Daily Fantasy Sports Sites’ Emerging Identity Management & Verification Challenges

Merritt Maxim

Recent business and sports headlines in the US have been dominated by state and federal government efforts to assess whether daily fantasy sports (DFS) sites, such as FanDuel and DraftKings, should be treated and regulated like gambling. The New York State Attorney General recently issued cease-and-desist letters against DraftKings and FanDuel to stop accepting bets in the state, stating that DFS operations are illegal gambling.  

Last week, Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey announced a plan to allow DFS providers to operate in Massachusetts under certain provisions, such as:

·         Prohibiting anyone under 21 participating in DFS.

·         Prohibiting professional athletes and other employees of pro teams from participating in DFS.

·         Prohibiting employees of DFS providers from participating in games

·         Requiring DFS providers to identify ‘‘highly experienced’’ players on all contest platforms and offer ‘‘beginner’’ games that would be off limits to the more experienced players.

These provisions present a range of identity management and identity verification challenges and questions, such as:

·         How will sites verify the ages of online participants?

·         How will systems detect DFS employees?

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Knowledge Management Delivers Real Results For Customer Service

Kate Leggett

Why the continued focus on knowledge management? It’s because customers increasingly leverage web self-service as a first point of contact with a company. In 2014, web self-service was the most commonly used communication channel for customer service, exceeding phone use.  And good web self-service relies on a solid foundation on knowledge management. Companies are also investing  in knowledge management solutions to add order and easy access to content for customer service agents.

Knowledge delivered to the customer or the customer-facing employee at the right time in the customer engagement process is critical to a successful interaction. When done correctly, knowledge delivers real, quantifiable results like:

Reducing customer service costs: For example,  Dignity Health, a California medical group  relies on a knowledge base to help them maintain a 73% call resolution rate and has resulted in a $580,000 annual savings. 

Increasing customer satisfaction: For example, Zuora, a US-based subscription billing provider, uses web self-service to deliver knowledge relevant to the stage in the customer journey — including sales and onboarding — to drive product adoption and decrease churn. Zuora structures knowledge to encourage customers to learn how to use the product, instead of simply providing a fix. Increased customer engagement moved Zuora's NPS by 20 points, increased site traffic by nearly 100% year-over-year, with 55% of traffic driven by their self-service site.

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CA Technologies Dials Up Its Efforts In The “Better Software, Faster” Game

Diego Lo Giudice

I am just back from the CA World 2015 in Las Vegas, where everything was cool: from the weather, with unexpected but welcomed temperatures in the low 50s; to the event theme, with a strong focus on Agile, DevOps, APIs, and security; to Fall Out Boys and Sheryl Crow’s concerts. 

As digital pervades all industries, and software becomes the brand, CA Technologies, which has traditionally had a stronger focus in the IT operations or “Ops” world, is making huge efforts to conquer the hearts and minds of the developers of large-scale development shops, or the “Dev”world. No doubt CA has been building a stronger DevOps in the last few years. Its goal is to partner in a larger industry ecosystem and be better positioned to serve the many organizations that are struggling to scale Agile and consistently build better applications faster. To make a stronger play in the Agile and Dev side of DevOps, CA made two brilliant acquisitions in 2015 which CEO Mike Gregoire highlighted in opening session of CA World: Rally Software, a leader in Agile project management at Scale, and Grid-Tools, a leader in Agile test data management and test optimization and automation.

With its revamped Dev strategy, CA aims to enter the Olympus of those large software and enterprise companies that have moved thousands of internal developers, testers, operations pros, and even managers to Agile and DevOps. With this transformation, CA will position itself to better serve current and future clients’ new needs to develop more software at speed. While CA started this transition much later than its competitors like IBM, Microsoft, HP, and other large software players (and even traditional end user enterprises), we recognize it’s still in time!

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What’s New With I&O: November 2015

Eveline Oehrlich

This season, our research challenges you to push your understanding of the I&O role outside of the traditional responsibilities. We examined opportunities for cross-team collaboration, adopting knowledge from distinctive sources, and areas that require a fresh outlook.


Good I&O practices don’t just mean back-room productivity – your employees need to be satisfied with what you do in order to be deemed successful. However, if you’re not meeting their basic needs for effectiveness, ease, and pleasant interaction, chances are they’ll turn to self-service rather than to you. Elinor Klavens offers up five strategies in her “Five Key Initiatives To Wow Your Workforce With Your Service Desk” report that will help you craft a service desk that is both effective for your employees and fosters your good reputation.


Have you ever thought of expanding your DevOps practices to include your security team? If not, you’re long overdue for doing so. DevOps can only improve and deliver so much without getting input from security professionals. If you want to include effective and necessary security practices and fend off known problems, you won’t be able to do it alone. Enter Rugged DevOps. Amy DeMartine describes what rugged DevOps is and what the main principles are so that I&O pros can work cohesively with security professionals to achieve faster releases with stronger application security in her report, “The Seven Habits Of Rugged DevOps.”


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Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) Companies Continue to be Attractive Acquisition Targets

Merritt Maxim

Last week, Courion announced its acquisition of Nova Scotia-based SecureReset, which, through its QuickFactor product, provides mobile-based two-factor authentication (2FA). This is the fourth acquisition of a 2FA startup by an enterprise software vendor in 2015:

·         Twilio acquired Authy, February 2015 (purchase price N/A).

·         Salesforce acquired Toopher, April 2015 (purchase price N/A).

·         Micro Focus acquired Authasas, July 2015 (purchase price N/A).

·         Courion acquired SecureReset, November 2015 (purchase price N/A).

These acquisitions reflect ongoing enterprise demand for 2FA solutions as an alternative to passwords. By now, the problems with passwords are well-known: They are easy for hackers to steal in bulk, and ongoing advances in computing processing power have eroded password security.

Since a password-free world is still somewhere off in the future, two-factor authentication provides a compelling password alternative that can help mitigate security risks. The evolution toward software-based 2FA form factors running on smartphones instead of dedicated single-purpose hardware tokens has eased deployment and training costs; it has also enabled large-scale consumer deployments of two-factor authentication as a password replacement alternative. These 2015 acquisitions demonstrate the continued interest in two-factor authentication.

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Your Business Is Already A Multicloud Business

Paul Miller

For all sorts of reasons, CIOs increasingly find themselves trying to introduce (or impose, resurrect, or enforce) governance, compliance, audit and oversight across a dizzying array of cloud solutions. Some may have been introduced by themselves or their predecessors, but most have entered the business by other means.

image of clouds in the desert

Multiple clouds, in the Nevada desert (Source: Paul Miller)

Perhaps they've been procured, properly, by departments from Sales and Marketing to Logistics and Customer Support. Or perhaps it's a lone developer or a small team, with a company credit card and a problem to solve.

However it happened, your business is already a multicloud business, and the CIO is — increasingly — expected to answer for inefficiencies, regulatory lapses, poor financial controls, and more, wherever they crop up in a sprawling and confused IT estate.

The easy solution might be, at first glance, to assert control. To select a single provider, and to enforce that selection. To prowl the corridors of the business, plucking public cloud credentials and SaaS admin accounts from the unwilling fingers of employees. 

But the braver CIO is the CIO who embraces their multicloud reality, who works to understand how and why committed and engaged employees felt it necessary to seek out their own solutions, and who learns lessons from the failures of the recent past.

And it's this CIO who is the champion of my latest report, published today: A Clear Multicloud Strategy Delivers Business Value.

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Oracle Delivers “Software on Silicon” – Doubles Down on Optimizing its Own Software with Latest Hardware

Richard Fichera

What’s new?

Looking at Oracle’s latest iteration of its SPARC processor technology, the new M7 CPU, it is at first blush an excellent implementation of SPARC, with 32 cores with 8 threads each implemented in an aggressive 20 nm process and promising a well-deserved performance bump for legacy SPARC/Solaris users. But the impact of the M7 goes beyond simple comparisons to previous generations of SPARC and competing products such as Intel’s Xeon E7 and IBM POWER 8. The M7 is Oracle’s first tangible delivery of its “Software on Silicon” promise, with significant acceleration of key software operations enabled in the M7 hardware.[i]

Oracle took aim at selected performance bottlenecks and security exposures, some specific to Oracle software, and some generic in nature but of great importance. Among the major enhancements in the M7 are:[ii]

  • Cryptography – While many CPUs now include some form of acceleration for cryptography, Oracle claims the M7 includes a wider variety and deeper support, resulting in almost indistinguishable performance across a range of benchmarks with SSL and other cryptographic protocols enabled. Oracle claims that the M7 is the first CPU architecture that does not present users with the choice of secure or fast, but allows both simultaneously.
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Mobile Becomes A Key Success Imperative For CIOs

Dan Bieler

Forrester survey data highlights the urgency for the CIO to complete the mobile mind shift. In the age of the customer, great mobile solutions are the basis for catering to clients, empowering employees, and optimizing supplier and partner relationships. Yet, the mobile mind shift has its roots in the consumer environment. Most of us have gone “mobile native” over the last few years, having grown accustomed to using apps on our smartphones and tablets at home. This has changed the way we think, look for information, communicate with others, and conduct transactions.

Mobile is now a vital part of the CIO’s business technology agenda to help enhance customer experience, employee productivity, and new revenue channels. Every CIO will need to provide his organization with mobile solutions that support these business requirements. The lack of a comprehensive mobile approach with dedicated interdisciplinary teams for mobile and digital initiatives will translate into lower revenues and many business failures in the years ahead. The most visionary and forward-looking CIOs, meanwhile, are using mobile to build the steppingstones for their digital transformation:

  • Businesses that are most mature in mobile also have the fastest revenue growth rates. Forrester survey data highlights that the most “mobile-mature” organizations also have higher revenue growth rates than the mobile laggards. Mobility is thus an important revenue driver.
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Telstra Shows Promise For European CIOs As A Network Solutions Provider In Asia

Dan Bieler

At a recent event in Sydney, Telstra, Australia’s incumbent network solutions provider, provided new insights into its strategic activities under its new CEO Andrew Penn. Overall, Telstra’s strategy remains in line with that communicated last year; we suggested then that for European CIOs and technology managers, Telstra represents an attractive network solutions provider for their organizations’ activities in Asia. But Telstra has evolved since then. Discussions with Telstra executives have provided us with new information and have led us to several new observations:

  • Telstra’s digital strategy is beginning to take shape but remains fragmented. Like many other telcos, Telstra has created a digital division to develop digital retail offerings for SMBs and consumers. In its current shape, this approach carries some risks, as Telstra’s Global Enterprise Services and Software divisions are also pursuing separate digital activities. As a result, duplicate and potentially contradictory digital offerings could emerge. Although Telstra claims that it is coordinating these activities, the current set-up underlines the fact that Telstra doesn’t yet have a digitized strategy; it is instead pursuing several digital strategies. This could cause confusion for customers, inefficiencies for Telstra, and flawed end-to-end customer journey mapping, thus undermining the value that Telstra can deliver to CIOs as a business enabler.
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The Broken Promise of IoT -- And What To Do About It

JP Gownder

My colleague Michele Pelino and I have just published a major new report, Bridge The Broken Internet Of Things Promise. At its best, the Internet of Things (IoT) -- a catch-all term for technologies that enable objects and infrastructure to interact with monitoring, analytics, and control systems over Internet-style networks -- has the potential to reshape customer experiences. 

In the report, we cover the example of Royal Caribbean's Quantum of the Seas, undoubtedly one of the more impressive examples of how IoT and wearables can redefine digital customer experience (DCX) while also employing digital operational excellence (DOX) in service of customers. In one of several DCX examples, Royal Caribbean has made the Quantum a wallet-free zone using wearable bands that act as everything from the key to your quarters to purchases at the bar. For DOX, the Quantum solves a perpetual pain point for both customers and crew: Did a particular piece of luggage make it onboard and, if so, where is it? RFID tagging and a mobile app solve this operational problem nicely. (See Figure for a screen shot of the mobile app).

As we detail in the report, RFID tracking has revolutionzed the check-in process, improving the speed of the process, lowering errors, and giving customers peace-of-mind.

So IoT sounds like a panacea for retailers, hospitality firms, travel vendors, and similar firms -- right?

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