Your Chance To Contribute: What Does Every Exec Need To Know About The Future Of eCommerce Technology?

I am busy polishing up my content for the Internet Retailer Conference in Chicago next week. My topic is a great one which I love to talk about: “What Does Every Exec Need To Know About The Future of eCommerce Technology”. In many ways this is an evolution of a piece of research I published last year which thankfully still enjoys some great readership: “The Future Of The eCommerce Platform”. I think this research is still very relevant today, and I would be just as pleased with it if we hit “publish” on it today. But of course many things have changed too; our industry does not stand still for a second.

So as I work on my presentation, I am thinking maybe I should cast a net and see what you, our well-informed and highly experienced readers, have to say about the future of eCommerce technology.

What do you wish your senior management knew? What do you wish your clients knew?

I look forward to hearing from you below, via email, or Twitter works too (if you think you can get this great idea of yours under 140 characters -- sounds like a challenge). I can be found @bkwalker. Ideas big and small are welcome, and I will be citing these great examples and ideas if I use them.

I look forward to seeing many of you in Chicago next week.

Thanks, Brian

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Comments

it's anywhere, it's everywhere

Best of luck tackling a great topic at the show, Brian.

I suppose simply put, the customer is more in charge than ever before, likely more than anyone ever dreamed possible. And that notion will only continue to expand. As you well know, e-tailers will need to plan and react to this reality more and more. No more silos - and this time we mean it. They - your customers - mean it! Retailers will need to totally and completely integrate the management of merchandising, promotions, products, and customers and serve consumers via the channel of *their* choice, including the web, mobile devices, the call center, and social networks. Every place, every channel, everywhere.

Tucker
ATG

If they come by Fridge, will it feel like our Brand?

Thanks Brian. I think one of the most powerful messages being addresses here is the "new age" of multi-channel commerce (or all channels) across "splintered" mediums, devices, etc. and that the experience (in the broadest sense) for each channel needs to be highly optimized and in-line with the retailer’s brand.

Today, most retailers and platform technology providers are really only thinking about the browser (hopefully multiple browsers), in-store integration, external channels like Amazon, Sears, etc., and a basic level of “mobile” commerce. As you suggest, many retailers struggle to understand the impact of the tactics they implement online and are often balancing their brand with sales growth through these channels. Many are not even aware. This was best described in the example you gave of a shopper returning a product to a retail store that was bought online and the customer was denied.

Going forward, as retailers and technology vendors examine usability for "commerce channels", it is important to "zero-in" on commerce essentials "find, research, checkout, service, improve" and how these principals should influence internal policies and ultimately how they deploy tactics that are in-line with their brand.

In the new world (which we’re entering at light speed) knowing your customers and being aware of the customer experience (like the return example) across channels, will be even more critical (and challenging) to preserving and growing a retailer’s brand.

If they come by Fridge, will it feel like our Brand?

Thanks Brian. I think one of the most powerful messages being addresses here is the "new age" of multi-channel commerce (or all channels) across "splintered" mediums, devices, etc. and that the experience (in the broadest sense) for each channel needs to be highly optimized and in-line with the retailer’s brand.

Today, most retailers and platform technology providers are really only thinking about the browser (hopefully multiple browsers), in-store integration, external channels like Amazon, Sears, etc., and a basic level of “mobile” commerce. As you suggest, many retailers struggle to understand the impact of the tactics they implement online and are often balancing their brand with sales growth through these channels. Many are not even aware. This was best described in the example you gave of a shopper returning a product to a retail store that was bought online and the customer was denied.

Going forward, as retailers and technology vendors examine usability for "commerce channels", it is important to "zero-in" on commerce essentials "find, research, checkout, service, improve" and how these principals should influence internal policies and ultimately how they deploy tactics that are in-line with their brand.

In the new world (which we’re entering at light speed) knowing your customers and being aware of the customer experience (like the return example) across channels, will be even more critical (and challenging) to preserving and growing a retailer’s brand.

Michael T
OrderDynamics

Michael, In my talk I spoke

Michael, In my talk I spoke to these various touch points you highlight here and the fast evolution of eCommerce into a a "dropping of the e", and the implications for technology and operations. I will be releasing a report soon covering these themes. I look forward to your feedback on that. Thanks, Brian