Google Chrome Browser Gets Street Cred From Sony

Sheri-McLeish by Sheri McLeish

Today’s news that Sony’s Vaio-brand computers are coming installed with the Google Web browser Chrome for users in the U.S. and Europe provides immediate legitimacy. The computers will also have Microsoft’s IE8 installed, but it makes Sony the first PC maker to sell computers with Chrome pre-installed. This opens the door for Google to rapidly boost consumer market share for its browser and signals that:

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Microsoft Office 2010: The Odyssey Continues

Microsoft Office Still Owns The Desktop, Future of StarOffice Unclear

Sheri-McLeish By Sheri McLeish

Since the Oracle acquisition of Sun, there’s been no official word yet on the road map for Star Office. Oracle says it’s vision is to deliver an integrated system from applications to disk, ostensibly a commitment to an OpenOffice.org productivity suite. Yet, that’s not a foregone conclusion. Star Office was just part of the package Oracle got in its acquisition of Sun. Its relative value is to give Oracle a starting point to compete with Microsoft Office, but more likely Star Office’s journey with Oracle will take one of two paths:

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Free And Freer: Lotus Symphony Could Be Your Unsung Hero, But Only If You Hear About It

Sherimcleish By Sheri McLeish

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Better Latte Than Never: Microsoft Office Web Apps Percolating

Sherimcleish By Sheri McLeish

When Microsoft announced this week that its next version of Office will include web apps there was no real surprise. But it reminded me of Steven Wright on Dr. Katz when he acknowledged that he usually had four or five cups of coffee before his first cup of coffee. Knowledge workers have started drinking at the web apps cafe, but are just getting warmed up for the real thing. It’s when Microsoft’s brew is ready that it starts to count.

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Adobe CS4: How Suite It Is

SherimcleishBy Sheri McLeish

Adobe launched Creative Suite 4 today, which was billed as, "the most compelling release in Adobe’s history." But does the product live up to the hype? Absolutely. This release of CS4 solidifies Adobe's uniquely dominant position in the creative design tools world as the single greatest suite of tools and technology to enable the creation of print, web, and interactive content. With hundreds and hundreds of new features, this release will save your people time and effort to create high quality content, which in the big-budget creative field translates directly into money.

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Chrome: Google’s Shiny New Browser Doesn’t Dull IE’s Dominance

SherimcleishBy Sheri McLeish

Google's beta launch today of its own open source browser, Chrome, is an unsurprising step that complements Google's ongoing efforts to own the desktop and take market share away from Microsoft. While others have tried to and failed to chip away at Microsoft's desktop browser IE, Google has good reason to think it can go head-to-head with MS — it has the eyes of consumers in North America and Western Europe, and access to millions of people and resources to further own the desktop experience building upon search, email, and calendaring. This isn't simply a play for the browser market; it's a component of a larger, long-term strategy to take over the desktop.

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Quark Making A Dynamic Comeback?

SherimcleishBy Sheri McLeish

Quark, Inc. has been undergoing a major strategic overhaul in the past two years. With its acquisition this month of In.Vision, the leading add-in to Microsoft Word for XML authoring, it appears poised to be taken seriously for enterprises wanting to empower their business units and be able to reuse content dynamically through a variety of channels.

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Pitney Bowes Picks The Right Path By Reaffirming Its Managed Services Business

CraigleclairSherimcleishBy Craig Le Clair and Sheri McLeish

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Microsoft Crashing The Party: Announces Intent To Support ODF And Join Standards Boards

SherimcleishBy Sheri McLeish

Wow. Microsoft opened up today, taking a nearly 180-degree turn to announce its intent to support ODF, PDF, and XPS. Overall, this is a great, positive move. While unexpected, it's not surprising. Microsoft has been moving towards more open standards, like with its recent DAISY XML initiative. But it's also a no-brainer. Sticking exclusively with its competing Open XML was divisive, complicating IT's efforts to leverage the benefits that open source XML provides.

But before we get too warm and fuzzy about this change of heart, remember: It's only an announcement of intent. The relationships with the OASIS Technical Committee and the ISO/IEC are not official and confirmed. The success of this strategy will only be realized if there are no hard feelings, and Microsoft doesn't try to bully into the committees' efforts. I suspect that Microsoft will be welcomed aboard, however. Certainly because the resources will be welcomed, but also because these organizations would be hard-pressed to deny Microsoft a seat at the table without looking divisive themselves.

There are three major components to today's announcement:

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