RM Market Poised To Grow, But There Are Short-Term Inhibitors

by Barry Murphy.

While market drivers like compliance, eDiscovery, and risk management get a lot of press (and point to great opportunity for records management), the fact is that many organizations are not ready for full-blown RM programs. Why? Mostly due to organizational immaturity — not correctly aligning roles, responsibilities, and budget ownership (for more on this, click here). But there is also the problem of mutliple repositories containing records; organizations struggle with the question of moving records to a central repository or investigating federated RM.

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Autonomy Ushers In New Era Of Information Management With Purchase Of Zantaz

by Barry Murphy.

Today began with very interesting news — Autonomy entered into a definitive agreement to purchase message archiving and eDiscovery vendor Zantaz. This is a great purchase for Autonomy. They have already integrated IDOL server into Zantaz's archiving and eDiscovery applications, so they can capitalize on synergies immediately. eDiscovery is a hot market for both companies — the combined entities will have likely the best brand value in the eDiscovery space. With organizations truly called to action by the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCPs), Autonomy/Zantaz has the solution set to help implement a short-term solution that can evolve into longer-term information management strategies (see our eDiscovery market overview for more information on how the FRCPs have become an information management spending driver).

This also makes Autonomy more attractive to the larger vendors, and I would not be surprised at all to see a CA, EMC, IBM, or Oracle in turn acquire Autonomy. Oracle makes the most sense as it is the only of the big infrastructure vendors that lacks the message archiving capability that Zantaz could provide.

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IT Must Lead Legal To The eDiscovery Promised Land

by Barry Murphy.

I recently co-presented at a workshop on eDiscovery.  Before I spoke about what enterprises are doing about exploding discovery costs and the fragmented solutions landscape, a very experienced corporate general counsel spoke to the IT-heavy audience.  The theme of his presentation was "help a lawyer today."  That's right CIOs and IT project managers - your legal team is not going to tell you how to handle eDiscovery.  You are going to be responsible for effeciently and defensibly collecting information in response to regulatory and legal requests.  In fact, legal is relying on your expertise in technologies to better manage information.

The moral of the story is that IT must take the leadership role in creating a formal, cross-functional team and process for managing eDiscovery.  Don't fret - here's a few cheat sheets to get you started:

A list of the vendors to consider in any solution (http://www.forrester.com/rb/vpc/catalog.jsp?catalogID=24)

And the questions to ask those vendors (http://www.forrester.com/Research/Document/0,7211,40824,00.html)

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eDiscovery Roundtable Is Enlightening

by Barry Murphy.

At the AIIM show in mid April, Xerox Global Services gathered a number of information management industry pundits to talk about issues related to eDiscovery. The conversation shed light on myriad issues that organizations face to meet the requirements of the newly amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP). You can listen to a podcast of the discussion here.  The major points of note:

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Retention Management Best Practices – Hard To Find

by Barry Murphy.

Last spring, Forrester introduced the concept of retention management, which extends records management to all content from creation through long-term retention and destruction (check out the Retention Management document).  Seems simple enough, but with so many repositories of information (hard drives, network file shares, SharePoint sites, email servers and archives, and any number of managed repositories) extending retention policies to all of it is all but impossible.

To get a sense of how organizations address retention management, I reached out to approximately 300 companies for a research interview, figuring maybe 10 would be willing to speak about what they are doing.  In an indication of how hot the topic is, over 30 companies wanted to speak further.  Having conducted about half the interviews so far, it’s clear we are at the very beginning of the learning curve for retention management. 

Some emerging hypotheses to date:

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