Aetna's CarePass Saga Presents Valuable Lessons To The Healthcare Industry

Last week, Aetna decided to decommission CarePass, its consumer data aggregation platform. It was initially much heralded; however, this development highlights some of the fundamental problems with the health plan’s early forays into this space. I have outlined these issues in my new report, “The Unfulfilled Promise of Plan-Owned Digital Health and Wellness Platforms.” The report went to publication before the CarePass development was announced, but this decision is not at all surprising and validates many of the fundamental challenges with early platforms identified in the report.

The decision to unplug CarePass underscores the fact that there are lots of hurdles for enterprises when it comes to growing digital health as a business. What’s interesting about CarePass is it actually cycled through several different business models during the course of its evolution – ultimately repositioning the business model late last year to go directly after employers. With this pivot, CarePass essentially became a “bring your own” wellness tool servicing the traditional book of health plan business. This may have been the best approach for CarePass, but it came late in the game. Insurance, as a whole, is going to change dramatically over the next three years — with exchanges, defined contribution, etc. Given the competing priorities and the struggles to gain adoption, CarePass may have been doomed before the final pivot back to the employer. However, CarePass did a lot of things right and the CarePass team should be congratulated for their forward approach to the market.

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Starting A Mobile Banking Project? There's A Checklist For That

In his excellent book, The Checklist Manifesto, Atul Gawande makes a compelling case for the power of simple checklists to avoid issues and mistakes during the decisioning process. Gawande's thesis is essentially this: A consistently applied, step-by-step checklist can be enormously valuable for a range of professionals from doctors to software designers to executives at major companies.

Add to this group the lowly mobile banking strategist.

So Forrester built a checklist for anyone leading a mobile banking project. I encourage you to download it today. (It also conveniently prints out as a two-page physical checklist for those who still love paper!) Our checklist provides 20 key questions you and your team should ask and answer. These checklist items are divided into five key areas (see image below).

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Where’s Your Next $Bn In Growth Coming From? Your Home Market? I Don’t Think So…

Depending on the viewpoint of your favorite economist, the recession may be over. But retail growth is far from buoyant in many markets. The UK retail sector shows healthy signs of recovery, while US consumers seem be less confident. There are numerable success stories; John Lewis passed the £1bn online revenue mark this year, while Macys is in its fifth year of double-digit online growth, in spite of a slightly shaky offline performance. But as an eBusiness leader, no matter what your local market conditions, I’m willing to bet one thing.

Your growth targets haven’t gone down.

For many years, growing online revenues has been a core strategy for most B2C firms, and many B2B firms are also riding the eCommerce wave. But as markets become crowded and competition becomes tighter, globalization is an increasingly attractive option for eBusiness professionals. With southern European markets seeing online growth rates in the high teens and even bigger opportunities like Russia and China on the global horizon, it’s no surprise that an international strategy is high on the agenda for many eBusiness leaders.

But going global is complex.

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Can Gamification Boost Digital Bill Pay?

[Quick note: If you read my old blog post about gamification, you may hope to earn more Peter Wannemacher Points. Well congrats! You just earned 150 more Peter Wannemacher Points! Plus, you can collect a digital badge if you read to the end of this post and send me an email!]

Forrester has outlined how and why digital teams at banks should employ gamification - defined as the insertion of game dynamics and mechanics into non-game activities to drive a desired behavior - to engage customers and employees. Banks like BBVA have used gamification in online banking. But what role can tech solutions vendors play in helping banks better employ gamification techniques?

Fiserv’s current version of CheckFree RXP uses gamification to increase digital bill pay adoption among its bank clients - our research shows online bill pay is a critical secure site feature on banks' websites. So I spoke with Justin Jackson, senior product manager at Fiserv, about the company’s use of gamification. Right away, he made it clear that gamification is not just “building an online game for people to play” but the process of “taking cues from game design to better engage users.”

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Manhattan Associates Acquires GlobalBay: Legacy POS gets another competitor

 

Yesterday Manhattan Associates announced the acquisition of mobile point of service (mPOS) provider GlobalBay Technologies.  A few years ago, it might seem odd that a warehouse and order management company would be interested in playing a significant role in the experience of customers and associates on the sales floor. However as we recently covered in our Omnichannel Order Management Wave, the role of distributed order management has been elevated and is now key to meeting customer’s rising expectations. Along with orchestrating orders across all inventory locations, omnichannel order management systems (OMS) are already taking orders in the call center, handling fraud management, and providing mobile utilities for associates to fulfill orders from stores. Moving into the point of service (POS) space with an mPOS solution is a logical evolution for Manhattan Associates since it combines enterprise inventory visibility, order management, and order capture all under one roof. In addition this acquisition provides a stronger differentiator from their largest competitor IBM, who exited the legacy POS market in 2012.

So what does this mean for POS moving forward?  Three distinct solutions are now possible, including:

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Chinese eCommerce Giant JD.com Develops Its Territory Further

JD.com is the second largest B2C online retailer in China. Through 10 years of development, it has become the largest direct sales eCommerce company in China. It now has 46% of the total direct sales eCommerce market share and 47.4 million active users. Further cementing its market-leading position, JD.com successfully listed on Nasdaq in May 2014, with a market value of US$39.3 billion by August 12.

In the past few years, JD.com has made enormous investments in its logistics service to provide fast delivery and a competitive customer experience, including same-day delivery and half-day delivery in selected top tier cities. Recently, it launched a pilot project of mobile self-pickup van in Beijing and Chengdu, giving its delivery service more extensive coverage. When consumers shop on JD.com, they can choose the “self-pickup” option, select their location, and then choose the new “mobile self-pickup” option. By clicking the map under this option, shoppers can see the detailed location and operating time of the mobile self-pickup van. 

Figure 1: JD.com’s mobile self-pickup van

The mobile self-pickup van meets the needs of customers who can’t receive their goods at home or at a place of work, such as a factory district or school campus, which the delivery service can’t enter. This service gives customers more choices.

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Citi Expands Pre-Login Info For Mobile Bankers

More than two years ago, Westpac – a bank in New Zealand – rolled out its “Cash Tank” feature for mobile bankers. Suddenly, customers could view key information like account balances without needing to log in (needless to say, it was and is opt-in-only). This new mobile banking feature immediately made a splash and was hailed as a small-but-impressive innovation. Other banks – such as Société Générale in France and Bank of the West in the US – offer similar pre-login information features.

This led folks like me to wonder: How might digital teams at banks take pre-login information further or make it even better?

Great digital strategy is often about pushing the limits – and not just in big ways. So Citi’s recent update to its smartphone apps is noteworthy for the bank’s decision to push the idea of pre-login information even further with Citi Mobile Snapshot. Citi customers who bank via their mobile phones can view not only balances but recent transactions without the hassle of logging in.

We spoke with Andres Wolberg-Stok, Global Head of Emerging Platforms and Services who shared with us a diagram that demonstrates the evolution of its mobile banking effort before and after Citi Mobile Snapshot (see below).

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Not Your Parent's Order Management System

Last week Peter Sheldon and I published The Forrester Wave TM: Omnichannel Order Management, Q3 2014 report, assessing order management vendors targeting omnichannel businesses.  Compared to our 2010 Forrester Wave on order management hubs, this new stream of research addresses the heightened requirements that order management systems (OMS)  must now help broker and fulfill orders across all distribution centers as well as physical stores. Based on our research many retailers are seeing a significant lift in online sales by enabling all inventory in the enterprise to be sold.  The omnichannel OMS applications evaluated in this Wave differ from our 2010 evaluation because:

  • Inventory transparency is a priority. In a world where digitally enabled customers expect to find and purchase products from any touchpoint, inventory visibility is now a requirement for OMS applications. The OMS today is responsible for consolidating and maintaining inventory positions from various systems including WMS, eCommerce and even from the supply chain. This consolidated, enterprise view of inventory is made available to customers in near-real time, affording shoppers the best opportunity to have their needs met regardless of the whereabouts of the product.  
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Digital Disruption Is Happening In Financial Services, You Get It. Now What?

Over the past year, we’ve told banks that some of them would become custodians. We’ve told insurers that many of them would be forced to specialise. We’ve told wealth management firms that many would shrink. We’ve done this to show them how digital disruption could savage retail financial services, just as it has done with the music and publishing industries.

But we don’t want to be just the bearers of bad news: We want to help you deal with new players like peer-to-peer lending platforms and even Google entering retail financial services. And to be fair, it’s not all bad news. There are plenty of companies out there using digital innovation to meet their customers’ financial needs in new and better ways. Take for example BBVA which has brought its customers the virtual assistant Lola, video banking, and the crowdfunding platform called Suma. And BBVA hasn’t stopped here. The Bank is currently running the sixth edition of its Open Talent competition for start-ups most likely to affect financial services.

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The Digital Money Management The People Want

We at Forrester believe Digital Money Management, often referred to as Personal Financial Management (PFM), is the future of digital banking. But as we find in our new report, The State Of Digital Money Management 2014, available here, it doesn't appear to be the present. Fewer than 22% of customers in the US and Europe have used a single money management feature in the last 90 days.

Why? It's simple: most people just don’t want to manage their money. They don’t want to budget, as in doing any work. They don’t want insight, beyond one or two bite size chunks. And they don’t want to save. They may think they want to, so they’ll set up a savings goal, but most won’t stick with it. Even if they do, it's not about the saving. It’s the buying – that’s the thing they actually want to do. 

Even with today's money management, I suspect many of the best users actually spend more, not less, as a result. Few banks measure this - and that's another blog - but it's an instinct I know some clients share. When customers have more transparency around their options, they feel empowered to buy more.  

Those users who have no choice but to save often find money management too depressing and give up. Efforts to gamify money management, to make it social, or send “you should save” reminders just alienates them further - the digital equivalent of that unopened bill reminder in the post. 

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