Collaboration Technology Should Be Part Of Your Customer Experience Tool Kit

Businesses invest considerable sums of money with vendors like Box, Cisco, Google and Microsoft for a collection a technology we call collaboration tools. As an analyst, though, the question that has dogged me in watching this space is "why?" As in "what is the actual value a business gets from investing in collaboration technology?" The vendors' rationale for acquiring collaboration tools has shifted in emphasis over time, going from a conversation on cost savings to one on productivity gains. However, cost savings is an undifferentiated and limited message while "increasing productivity" can feel ephemeral because it is difficult to measure. Yet my inquiry queue remains full of companies trying to figure out how best to deploy these technologies and my briefings calendar is filled with startups and incumbents pitching new offerings in this space. This brings me back to my original question: Why?

Read more

A Mobile Mind Shift Infographic To Celebrate Our Publication

We published The Mobile Mind Shift this week! You can buy it herehere, or at your favorite bookstore. 

Read more

Q&A With Jeroen Tas, Chief Executive Officer, Informatics Solutions and Services, Philips Healthcare

Our Forum For Technology Management Leaders in London starts tomorrow and I'm very excited about the program that we have been able to put together across the two days. On day one, we will be hearing from Jeroen Tas, Chief Executive Officer, Informatics Solutions and Services, Philips Healthcare, about how he and his team have evolved IT to become a fundamental enabler of growth for Philips as a real-time, connected company. Jeroen has over 30 years of global experience as an entrepreneur and senior executive in the financial services, healthcare, and information technology industries. Before taking on his current position, Jeroen was the Group Chief Information Officer of Royal Philips, leading IT worldwide. 

In the run-up to the Forum, I asked Jeroen to answer a number of questions on Philips Healthcare's digital business journey. Jeroen's answers are a must-read for healthcare- and other technology management leaders about to embark on the same journey, and provide great insight into the challenges of making connected healthcare a reality. I look forward to hearing Jeroen speak on the main stage tomorrow!

Q: You have been a driving force behind Philips Healthcare’s strategy to create a connected healthcare world. Can you explain your approach?

Read more

Apple Extensibility And Powerful Network Effects

Apple’s new "Extensibility" feature took somewhat of a backseat to a host of exciting new developer tools announced at Apple’s developer conference a week ago. I’d like to briefly highlight its importance to the enterprise. 

In short, Extensibility makes it easy for apps to talk to each other, facilitating more complex mobile workflows and easy access to data stored in personal cloud services. It will spur app developers work together to speed the advancement of what employees will be able to accomplish on mobile. 

 To elaborate, Extensibility will enable:

  • Complex inter-app workflows for mobile employees. More advanced content creation apps have been slow to develop on mobile platforms, in part due to lack of app interoperability. Think of the multiple software tools we use to pull a contract from email, sign it, and send it back on a PC. Data must similarly flow across a variety of apps to accomplish this on mobile. Apple has done little to address this, until now.
  • Access to the personal cloud in enterprise apps. Employees rely on personal cloud services like Dropbox and Evernote to manage an expanding array of digital content online. But these repositories don’t integrate with the enterprise off the bat. Extensibility can act as a router to connect personal data with the apps your employees use every day on the job. 
Read more

Q&A With Oliver Bussmann, Group Chief Information Officer, Group Managing Director, UBS AG

In advance of next week’s Forrester’s European Forum For Technology Management Leaders in London (June 12-13), we had an opportunity to speak with Oliver Bussmann, one of our industry keynote speakers, about digital business and how UBS is responding to the challenges of digital disruption and to rising customer expectations.

Oliver Bussmann joined UBS in June 2013 as Group Chief Information Officer (CIO), responsible for the Group Technology organization. As Oliver will explain in his presentation on day 2 of the Forum, digital business transformation success in his view hinges on three key factors: A joint and strong partnership of IT and the business working together; creating a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship; consistent and authentic support of senior leadership to demonstrate by example that this transformation is real, necessary and appreciated.

I hope you enjoy Oliver's responses as much as I did, and do join us on June 12-13 to hear the full story!

Q: What is your agenda as CIO at UBS?  

As CIO my job is to position IT as a business enabler, this involves understanding the firm's strategic priorities, and ensuring we strike the right balance between (1) managing the traditional IT functions to ensure a cost-effective, reliable and secure infrastructure and (2) focusing on strategic IT, driving transformational change through innovation, to increase revenue opportunities and deliver real value to our business.

Read more

Apple's iOS 8 Focuses On Developers Building New Mobile Moments

Yesterday in San Francisco, Apple showed once again that it cares about developers. And well it should. With Flurry reporting consumers spending 86% of their smartphone time in apps, not Web sites, the 1.14 million apps in the US App Store are just a drop in the bucket. We expect to see that number swell to 10 million apps by 2020. But that will only happen if Apple and the rest of the mobile industry focus relentlessly on developers.

Apple's goal is winning all the mobile moments. [See our new book, The Mobile Mind Shift, for much more on this important way of looking at the mobile revolution.] Developers are key to reaching that goal. Here are the things that struck me from Apple's announcements yesterday:

  • More tools for developers. A new development language, "4,000" new APIs, a new testbed capability, and access to Touch ID, basic Siri language processing, and look-ahead typing are just the most obvious new capabilities that Apple is offering developers. To build innovative new apps, developers need all the tools and support they can get. These announcements reflect Apple's paced but steady rollout of things developers care about.
  • More access to more sensors, hence context. Though Apple downplayed the healthcare opportunities a bit, it knows that developers need access to all the sensors on the devices in order to build interesting mobile moments in health, fitness, and location-based applications. These applications need to take advantage of all the context of that moment. 
Read more