Getting The Right Digital Leadership

It's clear that digital leadership is needed to achieve the transformation to a digital business. But does a company need a single digital leader, or do all executives need to become digital leaders?

Last month I published a report on digital leadership that examined the DNA of early digital executives. From this research, we learned that all digital leaders must be able to deliver on digital competencies across three dimensions: strategic, transformational, and operational. The degree to which digital leaders need to emphasize each depends upon the organization's digital maturity (see figure).

What is clear from our research into digital business is that your business needs both the CIO and the CMO to join forces to enable the transformation to a digital business. In conjunction with Forrester's Forum For Technology Management Leaders, we'll be revealing a new piece of research on digital business in 2014. This research digs into the data to reveal that state of digital business across a range of industries — identifying who is currently leading digital initiatives. As well as delivering a keynote at the Forum based on "Unleash Your Digital Business," I'll also be presenting a track session that gets deeper into the question of digital leadership to help you answer the question of who should really lead digital business transformation.

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In Spite Of Similar Business Priorities, CIO-CMO Collaboration Is A Long Way Off In India

I’ve just published a report on CMO tech spending trends in India and what these trends mean for CIOs in the country. We found that Indian CMOs’ top two business priorities are addressing the rising expectations of customers and acquiring and retaining customers; 87% and 85%, respectively, of those we surveyed indicated that these are a critical or high priority. Interestingly, Indian CMOs’ business priorities echo those of Indian CIOs: 87% of Indian CIOs previously surveyed by Forrester cited addressing rising customer expectations as their organization’s top business priority (figure below).

                                 

Despite these common goals, our findings reveal that Indian CMOs are driving their own tech agendas by:

  • Accelerating the growth of their tech budgets. 62% of the Indian CMOs we surveyed plan to increase their technology budget in 2014, whereas just 41% of them actually managed to do so in 2013.
  • Establishing their own technology departments. Forrester estimates that 30% to 40% of CMOs in India have no working relationship with their CIOs. About 40% of marketing leaders are gravitating toward establishing a technology department within marketing.
  • Getting more involved in planning sourcing strategy and selecting marketing technology vendors. About half of the surveyed CMOs get involved in setting the overall sourcing strategy, aggregating demand for technology products or services, and selecting vendors to meet their requirements.
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62% Of Indian CMOs Will Increase Their Tech Budget In 2014

I just published a report on CMO tech spending trends in India and what these trends mean for CIOs in the country. For this report, we surveyed 101 CMOs in India to understand business and marketing priorities, marketing spending on technology, key tech management challenges, and how digital engagement is shaping marketing technology trends in the country. Key highlights from the report:

  • The age of the customer demands that CMOs become customer-obsessed leaders. Indian CMOs’ top two business priorities are addressing the rising expectations of customers and acquiring and retaining customers; 87% and 85%, respectively, of those we surveyed indicated that these are a critical or high priority. Focusing on customers is not new for CMOs; what has changed is the pace at which customer expectations are rising.
  • CMOs are responding by driving their own tech agendas. Today’s customers want faster and better service — and CMOs are looking to technology to make that possible. Sixty-two percent of the Indian CMOs we surveyed plan to increase their technology budget in 2014, whereas just 41% of them actually managed to do so in 2013. About 30% of marketing leaders are gravitating toward establishing a technology department within marketing in order to become self-sufficient. They’re investing in mobile apps, customer analytics, and are looking for new suppliers in winning digital engagement strategy.
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Wendy's, Mobile Payment Moments Need To Be One-Touch Easy

I love Wendy's Dave's Hot 'n Juicy 3/4 lb Triple burger as much as the next Neanderthal, especially after riding 50 miles in the rain. And I love mobile payments because while I often leave my wallet at home, I'm Strava-ing the ride so I always have my phone.

Now while Wendy's mobile payments app has the potential to make it easier to eat burgers on the road, it's getting bashed in the app store. And it has one more annoying problem that I'd like to focus on here: I have to read off a six-digit code for a counter clerk to enter to make it work. While reading off a code to inhale a burger when starving may not sound like much, it's harder than swiping a debit card, so it ain't easy enough.

In our research for The Mobile Mind Shift, we found that what matters most is delivering a great mobile moment -- a point in time and space when someone pulls out a mobile device to get something they want in their immediate context. Getting the mobile moment right is critical to being present in the small and important moments in your customers' lives. Two principles define a great mobile moment:

  1. Deliver huge customer benefit and value to the firm. If the moment isn't hugely beneficial to a consumer, then the mobile moment won't exist at all. The app must do something truly useful it won't earn a place on the screen.
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Dropbox For Business Pursues A Sensible Consumerization Path Into The Enterprise

Dropbox has 275 million users. It's steadily improving the business capability of its Internet file system. That makes it important to understand what Dropbox is doing and why it matters to business. Here's what they are doing:

  • Last week, Dropbox secured a $500 million line of credit. My take is that Dropbox will use this money to build datacenters as well as global business capacity. Today, the company uses cheap storage from Amazon S3, but it keeps all the juice (like user permissions, search metadata, and application data) in its own data centers. This cheap funding (debt is much cheaper than equity) gives it a reasonable capital structure to buy lots of servers to build global applications.
  • Yesterday, Dropbox made its new Dropbox for Business "linked folders" generally available. This feature lets technology managers give employees a business Dropbox that it can secure and own. Employees can link the business Dropbox to their personal Dropbox so they see all their files in a consistent way. When an employee leavers the firm, the business Dropbox disappears from personal devices (if it works as designed). Customers like Facebook are using this product and seeing a big shift in its employees moving business files from a personal Dropbox to the new business Dropbox.
  • Dropbox has attracted 100,000 disrupters -- many of which are targeting mobile moments. Mobile moments open up a universe of new personal and business applications to get things done in a small moments of need. This level of partner investment is a huge deal because it signals that Dropbox is becoming a file system for the Internet era. Using Dropbox, these innovators can simply inherit the entire file management and storage sub-system they need.
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