Content Marketing Fortnight IV: Some content marketing insecurity

What's happening (that's important) in the world of content marketing? This is your fortnightly round-up of the best of the best stuff online for marketers who think about content; for the previous "Fortnights", go to the bottom of the post. (And for more information about what the Content Marketing Fortnight is, see my intro from the first one. Get this curated newsletter in your inbox every other week? Send me a mail.)

Stealing content is in fact a crime
Blogger Mark Schaefer caught Verizon brazenly stealing his content (reprinting in full with no attribution, compensation or permission). It’s one of only instances of content theft he’s seen. Go ahead and curate content, but – by all means – attribute the source and don’t plagiarize it.

Content distribution space gets reaffirmation
OneSpot announced a recent $5+ million funding round to fund its mission to help businesses with a real, and common, problem: Getting their content in front of prospective customers. This is just the latest harbinger of a growing market for content distribution. Watch this space.

B2B buyers actually have emotions

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Are Your Social Marketing Efforts Competitive In China?

Too often, marketers wonder whether their social marketing efforts are keeping pace with those of their peers. Marketers in China are no exception. My most recent report, Benchmarking Social Marketing Efforts In China, will help them find the answer and optimize their social marketing strategies.

Overall, marketers in China show lots of faith in social media. Thirteen of 22 marketers we surveyed say they will increase their social media budget more than 25% in 2013 compared with 2012, and seven of them will increase it more than 50%.

However, they report only moderate satisfaction — on a scale of 1 (very dissatisfied) to 5 (very satisfied), we found an average satisfaction rating of 3.4 with the social tactics they are using and an average rating of 3.27 with social platforms. Based on these adoption and satisfaction ratings, we have categorized the social tactics and platforms that marketers use in China into four groups:

  • Essential: high adoption and satisfaction. These social tactics and platforms, such as branded social profiles and Sina Weibo, are marketers’ ideal choices.
  • Promising: low adoption but high satisfaction. These social tactics and platforms, such as Douban and reviews on companies’ own websites, are emerging, and their marketing value is not yet proven, but satisfaction among marketers now using them bodes well.
  • Overvalued: high adoption but low satisfaction. These social tactics and platforms, such as Renren, while widely used, fall short of marketers’ expectations.
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Rise of the Content Distribution Space

This morning’s announcement by OneSpot – a company that helps marketers place their content in front of relevant buyers through display advertising – of series A financing to the tune of $5.3 million may pale next to recent multibillion IPOs and valuations, but it says a lot about a new space opening up: content distribution.

While OneSpot and Resonance HQ (which offers a similar service) drive content engagement through banner ads, native advertising or sponsored content puts branded content straight into digital publishers’ editorial mix (often with “sponsored by” or “sponsor content” next to it). Vendors like Outbrain, Taboola, AdBlade, Sharethrough, LinkSmart, Nativo, Media Voice and AdsNative are vying for a $2 billion per year native advertising market that’s growing by as much as 20% year on year.

Add to this the plays by Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter that allow marketers to purchase visibility for their content in certain users’ timelines. For both Facebook and twitter, this is their only source of revenue for a growing proportion of mobile users, and it looks like Wall Street may be rewarding them for this mobile-driven success.

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Winners of the 2013 Forrester Groundswell Awards

Today at the Forrester eBusiness Forum in Chicago, I had the pleasure of announcing the winners of the 2013 Forrester Groundswell Awards. For the seventh edition of our awards we introduced all new categories, based on Forrester’s Marketing RaDaR model, and the way social programs can support the Marketing RaDaR. So our awards this year included the following categories:

  • Social reach marketing. This category recognizes social programs that effectively delivered marketing messages to new audiences — whether by word of mouth or by using paid social ads.
  • Social depth marketing. This category recognizes social programs that helped prospects explore products in detail and make a purchase decision — such as corporate blogs and communities, and marketers’ on-site ratings and reviews.
  • Social relationship marketing. This category recognizes social programs that engaged existing fans and customers in order to increase their loyalty and lifetime value — something that most commonly happens through branded profiles on social networks like Facebook and Twitter.
  • Mobile. Okay, we admit it: This one’s not necessarily social. But this category recognizes the great use of mobile tools and programs to reach business or marketing goals.
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How To Get Your C-Suite To Say "Yes!" To Your Social Marketing Proposal

Like many marketing leaders, you may find it challenging to accelerate the advancement of your social marketing initiative(s) because you are at a point where you need to articulate how your social marketing program(s) contributes value to your brand's business objectives. Whether you are launching a pilot social marketing program or a long-term corporate initiative, eventually you will need to get in front of your CMO and state your case for getting more budget and headcount to support your programs. Easier said than done? Well according to many marketers, it is. In fact, marketers tell us that ROI and measurement are the top two roadblocks they face when trying to advance their social marketing efforts — the very two things that the C-suite often demands when it';s time to allocate marketing resources. It's the ultimate marketer conundrum!

What are your top 3 challenges with social marketing

 

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Twitter Marketers Are Still Looking For Answers

Most of the large marketers we survey tell us their companies are active on Twitter. But just as marketers say they’re not getting enough value from Facebook, Twitter marketers are still looking for greater value as well. In fact, our new report today reveals that only 55% of companies that market on Twitter say they’re satisfied with the business value they achieve:

Why are Twitter marketers still looking for greater value?

  1. Marketers are using Twitter for the wrong objective. Marketers’ most common objective on Twitter is to build brand awareness. But consumers are most likely to become a fan or follower of a company in social media after they’ve already bought from that company. This means that marketers would have more luck using Twitter to engage their existing customers than to find new ones.
  2. Twitter must do more to support marketers. Twitter’s marketing business is still relatively young — its ads have been generally available for only about 3 years — but that business must mature quickly. Marketers say they need more guidance, education, service, and support if they’re going to use Twitter successfully. And just 44% of marketers say they’re satisfied with Twitter as a marketing partner today.
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Move Beyond Awareness With Interactive Video

Our advertising forecast shows that online video for marketing is big business and is only going to get bigger. In Europe, the CAGR for total ad spend from 2013 to 2018 is 2.19%, but for online video ad spend, it is a staggering 18.83%. The US shows a similar (albeit smaller) skew, with total ad spend CAGR of 4.49% and video at 22.39%. 

Video, then, is a big deal, but most marketers aren't realizing the full potential of the medium. Approaches to video online are broader than simply grabbing 30 seconds from your TV commercial and sticking it on an online display network. Broadly speaking, there are three approaches to video:

  1. Linear video — static. Pre-rendered content, where the video plays from beginning to end. It's just like TV adverts or the majority of video content marketing on the Web.
  2. Linear video — dynamic. Where video content is customized per user or segment, often at run time. This approach interacts with consumers' data (e.g., social profile information) and/or context (e.g., location) but does not allow users to directly interact with the material when playing. A great example of this is one directed by Jason Zada and Jason Nickel from production company Tool and is called “Lost In The Echo,” which pulls in pictures from a user’s Facebook page, superimposing those snaps with photos that characters in the video mourn over. 
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