Salesforce.com’s Private AppExchange Can Streamline Multi-SaaS Sourcing

salesforce.com’s 100,000+ customers now have a new option for streamlining SaaS sourcing across the enterprise: Private AppExchange. And, the price is right at $0. Free? Yes, free(!) but, don't assume this won't impact your costs.

Last week at salesforce.com's massive Dreamforce event, Forrester had the opportunity to learn more about some of salesforce.com's recent announcements -- including the Private AppExchange. This free add-on feature for salesforce.com users lets companies set up an AppStore that is private, personalized, and custom populated for their own company. The Private AppExchange lets organizations “distribute any app, to any user on any device through a central, secure store, using Salesforce Identity to grant employees instant access to the apps they need. Organizations can customize the store with own categories and branding.”

The Private AppExchange could help sourcing executives address goals for enabling SaaS sourcing that we frequently hear about, such as:

  • Lets users quickly discover and deploy solutions that meet their business needs
  • Supports collaboration and idea-sharing across all users at all levels of the company
  • Adheres to corporate standards (integration, data rules, security, contracting, and more)
  • Ensures favorable pricing based on overall corporate relationships and usage
  • Showcases the specific SaaS solutions already in use within the company
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Use Caution When Considering RDS Services For SAP Implementations

I’ve just returned from SAP’s 2013 SAPPhire China user conference; with more than 17,000 attendees, it’s still the largest SAP event on the planet. The vendor has recently launched new offerings, like HANA enterprise cloud and extended ERP solutions for new industries; it has also extended its China strategy by announcing SAP Anywhere, a bundle of cloud-enabled mobile CRM services, which it has just begun piloting here.

At the event, clients presented their feedback on SAP services, particularly rapid deployment solution (RDS) services. Ever since their launch two years ago, SAP has extended RDS services to more than 150 software applications. The RDS concept aims to provide everything out of one box; clients buy a bundle of application and implementation services. RDS services have brought tangible benefits to clients that want to quickly start their SAP journey or begin with pilot implementations before going for a full-scale rollout.

However, RDS does not apply to all SAP application implementations; it primarily depends on the client usage scenario. Forrester believes that RDS will not be an attractive choice in a few instances:

  • Large enterprises using SAP core ERP systems as a mission-critical application. Large enterprises normally make huge investments in these projects. Their primary focus is not on saving time or money; instead, their top priority is ensuring that the project is a complete success and that all functionality is rock-solid: well-developed and thoroughly tested. RDS services, which can cover up to 80% of ERP system functionality, may not be the best choice in this scenario. We’ve seen this happen in China and Southeast Asia time and time again over the past two years.
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Manufacturers In China Should Change Their Sourcing Strategy To Improve Business Competence

Chinese manufacturers are repositioning. They’re willing to invest more in improving their core competencies, like R&D and design capabilities, by using outsourcing providers that have successfully served foreign peer companies in the same industry. They must dedicate all their resources — including internal IT systems and solutions like ERP — to meeting this goal.

We recently published a case study on Tagal, a joint venture of ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe and Angang Steel in China. The company was finding it difficult to face up to new business challenges; not only was its infrastructure aging, but its original outsourcing services agreement was constraining business development.

To solve these problems, Tagal changed its sourcing strategy and successfully migrated its ERP system to an Itanium x86 platform to accelerate business processes. The resulting ERP efficiencies enabled employees to process orders and reports twice as fast as before. This has improved Tagal’s relationships with its customers, which are some of the world’s largest automakers. Tagal also reduced its total cost of ownership by 20% in the first nine months alone, primarily due to the simplified sourcing strategy.

How did Tagal achieve these tangible outcomes? It redesigned its service contract and employed three key principles when re-evaluating vendors:

  • Modifying sourcing governance. Tagal drew on lessons that it learned from 10 years of outsourcing. Its new service provider contract contains more penalty terms; for instance, the provider now must refund the outsourcing fee in any month in which it does not fix two system errors within an agreed time period.
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Vodafone Demonstrates Its Determination To Boost Its Enterprise Activities At Its Global Analyst Event

Dan Bieler, Henry Dewing, Henning Dransfeld, Katyayan Gupta, Brownlee Thomas, and Michele Pelino

Vodafone hosted its annual global analyst event in London recently, and it was a good event. Vodafone’s CEO Vittorio Colao kicked it off with a passionate endorsement of Vodafone’s enterprise ambitions. But will Vodafone’s market position as a leading mobile telco give it a tangible advantage in the broader enterprise global telecoms marketplace? We believe there is a good chance it will because:

  • Vodafone’s integrated pitch is credible. Vodafone comes up in nearly every conversation with Forrester enterprise clients that want to consolidate vendors for multicountry or “global” mobility services. Increasingly, our clients also are asking about Vodafone’s wired services. And those based in the UK and Germany are the most interested in learning about what’s available and what’s coming with respect to fixed-mobile bundling. Vodafone made a big play on fixed-mobile integration, most notably with the acquisitions of Cable & Wireless and Kabel Deutschland. Its network now covers 140 countries, 28 of which support MPLS networks for mobile backhaul. Vodafone also has big plans for refreshing and expanding its international IP backbone network to more than 60 countries.
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Luxoft’s Strong Start As A Public Company Reflects Growing Interest In Tech Services In Eastern Europe

Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) continues to garner interest from services buyers. Earlier this year, I wrote a report called “A New Dawn For Tech Services In Central And Eastern Europe” that highlighted how the region will become increasingly attractive to companies, as the skills and capabilities to be found there will be ever more important for the next generation of technology engagements. Such engagements will focus on developing software that will empower customers, partners, and employees with context-rich apps, helping them take action in their moment of need — what Forrester calls "systems of engagement."

Six months ago, Luxoft, one of the key providers in the region, announced its IPO. Last week, it released its first half-year results, and so it seemed an opportune time to reflect on both the region and the progress made by Luxoft so far. The highlights of Luxoft’s results are:
 
  • Revenues of $181.4 million for six months to September 30, 2013 (up 25% year-over-year).
  • Second-quarter revenues of $97.7 million compared with $74.1 million for the same period a year earlier.
  • Increased guidance for fiscal year 2014 to $384 million.
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Despite challenges, distributed Agile is possible

As we move to what Forrester calls ‘The Age Of The Customer,’ enterprises will need to reinvent themselves to systematically understand and serve increasingly powerful customers, we are seeing a notable shift in what the business expects from IT. IT requirements are increasingly being influenced by the business leader who wants technology to not just enable efficiencies but to also provide an edge over competition by helping to develop things like new marketing and sales channels, and applications that provide greater insights on buyer behavior and what influences them.

By 2020, we anticipate that evolving customer expectations will open up tremendous opportunities for businesses, but at the same time, they will evolve so rapidly that businesses that are unable to keep pace will face the threat of extinction. Therefore, the need of the hour is for speed. Getting software products and services to market quickly, cutting product development costs, while continuing to maintain high standards for flexibility, nimbleness, and time-to-market – this is leading to a tremendous increase in interest around Agile development.

Many organizations have already adopted Agile to some extent within their organizations. According to Forrester’s Forrsights Developer Survey Q1, 2013, 19% of developers stated they use Agile (Kanban, Scrum, TDD, XP). However, most of these initiatives are primarily in-house – Forrester’s Agile Survey Q3 2013 showed that the majority of organizations continue to use Agile more widely in-house, than with systems integrators.

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SAP Taps The Cloud To Grow In Asia Pacific

By Clement Teo, Fred Giron, Gene Cao, and Tirthankar Sen

SAP is betting that its future lies in the cloud. While the company still books just 5% of its global revenue from cloud services, SAP is putting the cloud at the center of its growth strategy, unveiling new business models and initiatives aimed at increasing the cloud consumption of its applications. To facilitate this, SAP is making it easier for clients and partners to embrace the cloud. For example, its cloud extension policy allows customers to reallocate existing license seats to a cloud subscription. Clients can unlock the stored value of unused licences and put it to work, giving end users access to meaningful applications in the cloud.

What It Means

SAP has a number of cloud services on offer, and the changes the company is making to pursue its high-growth strategy in Asia will not only transform SAP’s business model, it will also change how its partners do business. Client organizations in Asia will also have to adapt and:

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Brazil’s IT industry refines its value proposition

Although Brazil’s IT sector has frequently been compared as an up and coming challenger for India’s share of the offshore pie, Brazilian vendors are keener to position themselves as potential local partners rather than as nearshore alternatives. The reasoning is simple - with tremendous opportunity for growth existing locally, there is less motivation to pursue growth in untested and unknown markets. According to statistics provided by Brasscom, the domestic market for ICT is pegged around $123 billion in 2012 with a growth rate of about 10% year-on-year[i]. Moreover, the vendors lack serious muscle in terms of scale, and factors like limited availability of resources and an inability to differentiate on cost adds to this reluctance to compete with Indian offshorers.

Brazilian vendors differentiate on expertise in local market

The raison d'être of the Brazilian IT sector is quite different from that of India and is heavily focused on providing solutions and services to the huge domestic market that exists both within the country and in the rest of Latin America (Latam). Some key features of Brazilian vendors are:

  • Strong focus on local business’ needs. Most of the businesses in Brazil fall in the small and medium enterprise (SME) category and require a high level of customization of solutions and services to meet requirements, especially around local language interfaces and support. Most Brazilian vendors are very flexible and accommodative of these small clients’ needs for customization and for individually tailored pricing and delivery models.
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Telstra Analyst Event 2013: Many Rivers To Cross

Telstra hosted its annual analyst event in Sydney on October 23 and 24. In his keynote address, CEO David Thodey compared Telstra’s customer advocacy journey to a triathlon that the firm has just begun, which we believe it a fitting analogy for Telstra’s progress on the path it has set for itself. The company is clearly in the race and making progress, but still has many miles to go.

While the company shared a broad spectrum of initiatives, our main observations are that Telstra:

  • Has made clear progress since our check-in last year, but its transformation remains a work in progress. Telstra is no different than other incumbent telcos working to transform beyond traditional — and declining — sources of revenue. Its dominant position in Australia is secure, but its prospects in new market categories inside and outside of Australia are less certain. We do not believe that Telstra is particularly innovative compared with service providers in the US or Europe, but we do believe that it has a viable transformation strategy and is making progress. Its progress in the Australian media and entertainment industry, including its Foxtel investments, is impressive — it has built a large IP-based digital media file exchange platform to serve global broadcasters and content providers.
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An Asia Pacific First — The Forrester Wave: Asia Pacific Carrier Ethernet Services, Q4 2013

Carrier Ethernet aims to provide users with a wide-area service to connect sites, in the same way that asynchronous transfer mode (ATM), Frame Relay, and X.25 services from carriers have done in the past. While end user demand for carrier Ethernet services in Asia is relatively small, it’s growing year over year and is having an impact on service providers’ bottom lines: Carrier Ethernet services currently account for 8% to 10% of service providers’ total connectivity revenues in the region.

For The Forrester Wave™: Asia Pacific Carrier Ethernet Services, Q4 2013, we identified, qualified, and evaluated seven global and regional service providers that offer unmanaged site-to-site carrier Ethernet services to multinational companies in Asia Pacific: BT, Orange Business Services, Pacnet, SingTel, Tata Communications, Telstra Global, and Verizon. Key differentiators include the services that each vendor has on offer, such as flexibility in bandwidth bursting, granularity of access speeds, operational metrics and reporting, network coverage, and service-level agreements.

What It Means

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