Visionary companies are driving next generation enterprise architecture in China – are you ready?

For the past ten years, the major IT initiative within Chinese organizations has been service oriented and/or process driven architecture.  The pace of change has been slow for two reasons: 1) From an end user perspective, related business requirements are not clear or of high priority; 2) more importantly,  solutions providers have not been ready to embrace  technology innovation and  meet emerging technology requirements through new business models.

Times are changing. IBM and other major ISV/SI in China (as well as end users) are driving momentum around emerging technology, such as cloud and enterprise mobility.  I recently attended the IBM Technical Summit 2013 in Beijing from July 11 to 12.  Here’s what I learned:

  • Telecom carriers supported by technology vendors will accelerate cloud adoption by SME.  Contributing to more than 60% of total GDP in China, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) have always sought to simplify their IT operation as much as possible, and at the same time scale it up when business expands as quickly as possible. IaaS solutions appear to be a perfect match for SMEs; however IT professionals have concerns about the security and data privacy over the operations by other companies.
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Digital Customer Experiences: Integration Opens A World Of Optimization Possibilities

What if you could look over the shoulder of every one of your customers as they used your mobile apps, web pages, kiosks, and other digital channels? What could you learn? How might you use what you learn to dynamically adjust your digital experiences?

In the days when web applications were king, this type of insight was doable with simple web analytics and similar tools. Today, continual experience optimization is much more difficult because of:

  • Multiple interaction channels. You must collect, correlate, and analyze data in a coherent way across multiple channels of customer interaction. A single customer interaction may cross between channels or even use more than one channel at the same time.
  • Many back end servers. You must integrate data from multiple back end servers including recommendation engines, commerce, mobile application servers, digital asset management, community, collaboration, messaging, and more.
  • The need for rapid change. You must quickly change any or all of your digital experiences and back end services based on what you’ve learned.
  • The need for contextual experiences. You must use each individual customer’s context to dynamically adjust experiences in real-time.
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Systems of Engagement vs Systems of Reference – Core Concept for Infrastructure Architecture

My Forrester colleagues Ted Schadler and John McCarthy have written about the differences between Systems of Reference (SoR) and Systems of Engagement (SoE) in the customer-facing systems and mobility, but after further conversations with some very smart people at IBM, I think there are also important reasons for infrastructure architects to understand this dichotomy. Scalable and flexible systems of engagement, engagement, built with the latest in dynamic web technology and the back-end systems of record, highly stateful usually transactional systems designed to keep track of the “true” state of corporate assets are very different animals from an infrastructure standpoint in two fundamental areas:

Suitability to cloud (private or public) deployment – SoE environments, by their nature, are generally constructed using horizontally scalable technologies, generally based on some level of standards including web standards, Linux or Windows OS, and some scalalable middleware that hides the messy details of horizontally scaling a complex application. In addition, the workloads are generally highly parallel, with each individual interaction being of low value. This characteristic leads to very different demands on the necessity for consistency and resiliency.

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