Is your data working for you?

 

Every company generates data that would be of significant value to its customers, partners and potential partners; information that could be combined with insights from this ecosystem, public data and other sources to generate significant new discoveries, products and business values. But making our data available, easily consumable and getting payback for sharing it are significant hurdles.

Over many years we have built up an ever-more complex web of security, legal and data management practices that make it nearly impossible to share valuable info between companies in an open marketplace style – which is exactly what is needed to open up this value.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. There is a new approach that leading enterprises and governments are taking today that is significantly simpler, more manageable and empowers companies to share their key data more freely, opening up massive new market opportunities for all. Here's how a few Forrester clients are taking advantage of this new model:

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Big Data: The Big Divide Between IT and Business

 

I met with a group of clients recently on the evolution of data management and big data.  One retailer asked, “Are you seeing the business going to external sources to do Big Data?”

My first reaction was, “NO!” Yet, as I thought about it more and went back to my own roots as an analyst, the answer is most likely, “YES!”

Ignoring nomenclature, the reality is that the business is not only going to external sources for big data, but they have been doing it for years.  Think about it; organizations that have considered data a strategic tool have invested heavily in big data going back to when mainframes came into vogue.  More recently, banking, retail, consumer packaged goods, and logistics have marquis case studies on what sophisticated data use can do. 

Before Hadoop, before massive parallel processing, where did the business turn?  Many have had relationships with market research organizations, consultancies, and agencies to get them the sophisticated analysis that they need. 

Think about the fact, too, that at the beginning of social media, it was PR agencies that developed the first big data analysis and visualization of Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook influence.  In a past life, I worked at ComScore Networks, an aggregator and market research firm analyzing and trending online behavior.  When I joined, they had the largest and fastest growing private cloud to collect web traffic globally. Now, that was big data.

Today, the data paints a split picture.  When surveying IT across various surveys, social media and online analysis is a small percentage of business intelligence and analytics that is supported.  However, when we look to the marketing and strategy clients at Forrester, there is a completely opposite picture. 

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The Battle For The Indian Banking Industry Will Soon Intensify, And Big Data Will Decide Who Wins

 

On February 22, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), an institution that supervises and regulates India’s financial sector, announced guidelines allowing corporations to enter the banking sector. Private companies, public-sector groups, and nonbanking financial firms will all be eligible to apply for a banking license. We expect RBI to start issuing new bank licenses by early 2014.

RBI guidelines state that companies receiving a banking license must open at least 25% of their branches in rural areas. Despite this guideline, I believe that new entrants will primarily target the same urban and semi-urban customers that existing banks target. The reason is simple: These are the most profitable customers. This helps explain why 85% of rural bank branches in India belong to public banks; it’s simply not an attractive market for private banks.

What it means for current Indian banking CIOs: Leverage big data to grow your business or prepare to be left behind.

As competition increases, businesses will expect new IT capabilities to understand and respond to customer needs better, faster, and cheaper. Banking CIOs who embrace this change will adopt big data technologies and become true business partners. The ones who don’t will be bypassed by new entrants (when they come to play) using big data approaches and internal data from whatever market they’re currently in to analyze the banking market. These new entrants will likely influence customer preferences, question existing assumptions, and look for ways to disrupt the market. I recommend that current Indian banking CIOs:

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Ways To Address BI Skills Shortage

Whether you are just starting on your BI journey or are continuing to improve on past successes, a shortage of skilled and experienced BI resources is going to be one of your top challenges. You are definitely not alone in this quest. Here are some scary statistics:
  • “By 2018, the United States alone could face a shortage of 140,000 to 190,000 people with deep analytical skills, as well as 1.5 million managers and analysts with the know-how to use the analysis of big data to make effective decisions.” (Source: May 2012 McKinsey Global Institute report on Big Data)
  • “… trigger a talent shortage, with up to 190,000 skilled professionals needed to cope with demand in the US alone over the next five years.” (Source: 2012 Deloitte report on technology trends)
  • “Fewer than 25% of the survey respondents worldwide said they have the skills and resources to analyze unstructured data, such as text, voice, and sensor data.” (Source: 2012 research report by IBM and the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford)
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