Pricing Can Make Or Break The Customer Experience: Find The Issues That Drive Away Your Customers!

Pricing matters when it comes to your customers' experiences and loyalty! You are not quite sure? Let's do a short quiz:

Have you ever:

  • Left a rental car counter flabbergasted by the final price?
  • Given up on finding a new mobile phone plan when the sheer number of options obscured the best choice?
  • Checked your latest bank statement only to find an unexpected new fee?
  • Squeezed into a middle airplane seat because the alternative meant shelling out $20 for a preferred seat assignment?
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You Cannot MANAGE Customer Experience If You Cannot MEASURE It! Join The Workshop "Customer Experience Measurement Essentials"

Are you trying to take your current customer experience measurement to the next level?

Many of the customer experience professionals we talk to regularly are working on improving their customer experience measurement. You are probably one of them. You might be working on picking the right metrics, on connecting customer experience to business outcomes or to operational variables, on using data to improve the customer experience, or on getting traction for CX measurement in your organization. To conquer any or all of these challenges, you need a solid and well-founded customer experience measurement framework. 

In Forrester's workshop Customer Experience Measurement Essentials, you will:

  • Learn the fundamentals of measuring customer experience in both a business-to-consumer and business-to-business world.
  • Get to know Forrester's framework for how to identify, organize, present, and get buy-in for customer experience metrics across the enterprise.
  • Discuss your approach and challenges with your CX peers and see what other companies are doing.
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How Marshalls, Courtyard By Marriott, And Lowe’s Meet Customer Needs

Earlier this week, someone asked me which firms in the CXi do the best job at meeting customer needs. The three top scorers on that criterion were:

  • Marshalls (93%)
  • Courtyard by Marriott (92%)
  • Lowe's (92%)
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The Top 10 Pieces Of Advice From Voice Of The Customer Leaders

I was flipping through the 2012 Forrester Voice of the Customer Award nomination forms the other day, and I realized that I’ve been unwittingly holding on to an valuable resource — all the advice that we asked nominees to impart on other voice of the customer programs. The very last of the six questions on our nomination form is, “What advice would you give to other organizations to make their programs successful?” We got some great answers from the 40 or so nominated companies, so I pulled together the top 10 pieces of advice. If you’re looking for some inspiration for your own VoC program, look no further than the advice of your peers.

1. Build executive support. The majority of nominees offered this advice, and it’s consistent with Forrester’s own research showing that executive support builds a foundation for VoC success. Executive support helps CX pros put key building blocks in place, such as adequate tools to collect and analyze data and processes to systematically act on it. How do you build support? Prove the value of the program by demonstrating tangible business value. Track the results of service recovery efforts to save unhappy customers and aggregate the results of improvement projects initiated by VoC-collected data.

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How To Co-Create Your Customer Experience: Sweat The Details

It’s Valentine’s Day, so shout it as loud as you can: “I love my customers!” Now, prove it by designing products, services, and experiences that actually meet their needs. How are you going to do that? By involving actual customers (as well as employees and partners) in the design process.

This collaborative activity, called co-creation, might ring a bell — two of my recent blog posts addressed what co-creation means and what the benefits are. Co-creation is a versatile and valuable methodology. And while it might seem effortless, it usually doesn’t happen on the fly — which is why Amelia Sizemore and I wrote our latest report, tackling the logistics behind planning a stress-free and productive co-creation workshop.

Newbies often assume that the workshop itself will be the most challenging part of a co-creation initiative, but most of the heavy lifting actually occurs before participants ever show up. Advanced preparation — and lots of it — ensures a smooth and productive workshop that feels like it runs itself. For example, you need to:

  • Hook participants with the right incentives. T. Rowe Price asked a lot of its participants — in addition to a full-day co-creation workshop, participants completed a 30-day diary study and a phone interview. In exchange, the company rewarded each person with an iPad.
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Q&A From Last Week's Customer Experience Index Webinar

Last week, I did a webinar on Forrester’s Customer Experience Index, 2013. We didn’t have time to answer everyone’s questions, so I thought I’d post answers to those we didn't get to.  

"Can consumers respond to having an experience with multiple companies?"

In some cases, yes, and in some cases, no. In the bank, credit card provider, insurance, consumer electronics manufacturer, airline, hotel, and rental car categories, they can pick up to two brands they’ve done business with most in the past 90 days. For retailers, they can pick up to four. For the other six industries, they are limited to one.

"What is the threshold to determine if the person is a customer? Interactions one time, over time? A recent experience?"

We don’t strictly require the person to be a customer. The person could be a prospect or a former customer. All we ask is that this person has done business with the company in the past 90 days.

"Why don't you track high tech?"

We do, actually. Two years ago, we added the consumer electronics manufacturer industry, which covers most of the latest high-tech gadgetry. We don’t include software in part because there are just so many types of software and so many brands. It would be hard to narrow them down to something manageable.

"How does CXi map to NPS?"

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Take Our Survey About Your Digital Experience Improvement Projects Planned For 2013

It’s time again for our annual survey about all of the digital customer experience improvements, redesigns, and new digital experiences you’re working on this year. Please consider taking the survey, where we’ll ask you about:

  • What projects, if any, you have planned for this year.
  • Details about those projects, like budgets, staffing, and research tools.
  • Incremental improvements you’re working on in addition to — or instead of — the big projects.
  • To what extent all those projects and improvements are integrated.

Not planning anything? That’s okay — we still want to hear from you! 

The info you provide will help shape an upcoming report. And good news: To thank you for your time, we’ll send you a copy of that report when we publish it.

So what are you waiting for? Take the survey!

Thanks so much.

(Agency folks and consultants, sorry — this survey isn't for you, unless you’re planning projects for your own digital properties.)

Why Should You Co-Create Your Customer Experience?

Despite professed customer centricity, many firms don’t think to involve customers, employees, or key partners in the experience design process. That’s unfortunate, because this activity — called co-creation — can help companies understand what types of interactions will best meet people’s needs and then figure out how to implement those interactions the right way.

Co-creation might sound familiar. Some people use the term to refer to Facebook ideation contents or crowdsourcing websites like mystarbucksidea.com. But in the experience design world, co-creation isn’t about soliciting hundreds or thousands of ideas through an online community. It’s the process of face-to-face active collaboration for the improvement and/or innovation of mutually beneficial products, services, or experiences. During co-creation workshops, teams focus on eliciting deep insights from participants — and translating those insights into tangible prototypes that can be evaluated in real time.

Co-creation is an extremely versatile tool, one that can inform the design of discrete touchpoints, complex customer journeys, emotionally resonant experiences, and just about anything else you can think of — even the employee experience. But pulling off an effective co-creation session requires extensive planning, preparation, and willingness to let a few customers behind the scenes.

So what’s the payoff? In our recent report, Amelia Sizemore and I outline several of the benefits co-creation provides, including:

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