Financial Services eBusiness Teams Need A Tablet Strategy

Tablets are cool! The intuitive design and the standard features of tablets make it possible for digital financial services teams to create compelling customer experiences and support bank advisors and insurance agents in an effective and efficient way. Forrester forecasts that by 2016, 106 million people in the seven major Western European countries will own a tablet, while more than 112 million people will own one in the US. The rapid adoption of tablets means executives should make them an important part of their digital strategy. A tablet is a distinct touchpoint that needs a distinct strategy -- particularly banks that want to promote online banking or agent-based insurers -- and tablets can effectively support your multichannel strategy. Here are a couple of reasons why you should put a tablet strategy in place in the near future.

Tablets are a great device to promote self-service.

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Tectonic Shift In The ARM Ecosystem — AMD Announces ARM Intentions

Earlier this week, in conjunction with ARM Holdings plc’s announcement of the upcoming Cortex A53 and A57, full 64-bit CPU implementations based on the ARM V8 specification, AMD also announced that it would be designing and selling SOC (System On a Chip) products based on this technology in 2014, roughly coinciding with availability of 64-bit parts from ARM and other partners.

This is a major event in the ARM ecosystem. AMD, while much smaller than Intel, is still a multi-billion-dollar enterprise, and for the second largest vendor of x86 chips to also throw its hat into the ARM ecosystem and potentially compete with its own mainstream server and desktop CPU business is an aggressive move on the part of AMD management that carries some risk and much potential advantage.

Reduced to its essentials, what AMD announced (and in some cases hinted at):

  • Intention to produce A53/A57 SOC modules for multiple server segments. There was no formal statement of intentions regarding tablet/mobile devices, but it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that AMD wants a piece of this market, and ARM is a way to participate.
  • The announcement is wider that just the SOC silicon. AMD also hinted at making a range of IP, including its fabric architecture from the SeaMicro architecture, available in the form of “reusable IP blocks.” My interpretation is that it intends to make the fabric, reference architectures, and various SOCs available to its hardware system partners.
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