Let Big Data Predictive Analytics Rock Your World

I love predictive analytics. I mean, who wouldn't want to develop an application that could help you make smart business decisions, sell more stuff, make customers happy, and avert disasters. Predictive analytics can do all that, but it is not easy. In fact, it can range from being impossible to hard depending on:

  • Causative data. The lifeblood of predictive analytics is data. Data can come from internal systems such as customer transactions or manufacturing defect data. It is often appropriate to include data from external sources such as industry market data, social networks, or statistics. Contrary to popular technology beliefs, it does not always need to be big data. It is far more important that the data contain variables that can be used to predict an effect. Having said that, the more data you have, the better chance you have of finding cause and effect. Big data no guarantee of success.
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Dell Joins The ARMs Race, Announces ARM-Based 'Copper' Server

Earlier this week Dell joined arch-competitor HP in endorsing ARM as a potential platform for scale-out workloads by announcing “Copper,” an ARM-based version of its PowerEdge-C dense server product line. Dell’s announcement and positioning, while a little less high-profile than HP’s February announcement, is intended to serve the same purpose — to enable an ARM ecosystem by providing a platform for exploring ARM workloads and to gain a visible presence in the event that it begins to take off.

Dell’s platform is based on a four-core Marvell ARM V7 SOC implementation, which it claims is somewhat higher performance than the Calxeda part, although drawing more power, at 15W per node (including RAM and local disk). The server uses the PowerEdge-C form factor of 12 vertically mounted server modules in a 3U enclosure, each with four server nodes on them for a total of 48 servers/192 cores in a 3U enclosure. In a departure from other PowerEdge-C products, the Copper server has integrated L2 network connectivity spanning all servers, so that the unit will be able to serve as a low-cost test bed for clustered applications without external switches.

Dell is offering this server to selected customers, not as a GA product, along with open source versions of the LAMP stack, Crowbar, and Hadoop. Currently Cannonical is supplying Ubuntu for ARM servers, and Dell is actively working with other partners. Dell expects to see OpenStack available for demos in May, and there is an active Fedora project underway as well.

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