Has Amazon Solved Its Private Cloud Dilemma?

Amazon Web Services (AWS) is great, but many of our enterprise clients want those cloud services and values delivered on premise, behind their firewall, which may feel more comfortable for protecting their intellectual property (even if it isn't). AWS isn't very interested in providing an on-premise version of its solution (and I don't blame them). Today's partnership announcement with Eucalyptus Systems doesn't address this customer demand but does give some degree of assurance that your private cloud can be AWS compatible.

This partnership is a key value for organizations who have already seen significant adoption of AWS by their developers, as those empowered employees have established programmatic best practices for using these cloud services — procedures that call AWS' APIs directly. Getting them to switch to your private cloud (or use both) would mean a significant change for them. And winning over your developers to use your cloud is key to a successful private cloud strategy. It also could double your work to design and deploy cloud management solutions that span the two environments. 

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Cloud's Impact On IT Operations: Don't Overlook Your Legacy

Cloud computing has provided opportunities for organizations of all kinds to reduce the risks associated with IT acquisition (software and hardware), expand in sync with business needs, and contain costs. Some have even evolved their internal IT department from a reactive cost center to a more proactive service delivery center. Over the past two or three years, the very same cloud computing model that has helped CIOs deliver these benefits has also resulted in many IT organizations becoming more focused on auditing, inspecting, reviewing, and modernizing their internal IT capabilities. Unfortunately, in the majority of cases, there has been little to no forethought about how internal IT can be extended to embrace public clouds. In effect, IT organizations have so far turned a blind eye to external cloud solutions and focused instead on delivering internal (or private) cloud functionality.

Increasingly, organizations will try to replicate the value of cloud by modernizing, restructuring, and reimplementing their existing IT architectures using cloud concepts such as self-provisioning, elasticity, multitenancy, service-oriented architecture (SOA), and virtualization. Their well-meaning intent is to convert their existing siloed, massive, and underutilized IT systems to a better and efficiently connected cloud (private) environment.

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