The Consumerization Conundrum: Why Virtual Machines Won't Work On Mobile Devices

In Forrester’s Forrsights Workforce Employee Survey, Q4 2011, we learned that 60% of information workers use their devices for work and personal tasks. This dual use of PCs, smartphones, and tablets is a growing concern. One common idea is to create a virtual machine on mobile devices, in the same way that Citrix, Microsoft, and VMware products enable hosted virtual desktops on PCs. But this idea of having a “virtual smartphone for work” within your personal smartphone simply won’t work; it’s just as bad and impractical an idea as having two separate physical smartphones! Both approaches create separate spheres of work and personal that simply don’t reflect the seamless way that many people have to switch back and forth between work and personal tasks (excluding top-secret government work, of course).

I heard about a better idea this week. What if mobile device OSes enabled separate containers or sandboxes, under the covers, for enterprise applications and their data?

The idea is to have low-level separation in the OS architecture, supported and controlled by enteprise policy and certificates, that is transparent to the user. So the screen full of icons would allow us to mix work and personal icons any way we please, but they’d be separate under the covers. So the experience would be like that of looking at the overall address book on your smartphone, which on iOS, Android, and Windows Phone all integrate your contacts from different sources into one seamless list — even though they are separate on the back end.

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Defining IT Service Management – Or Is That “Service Management”?

IT service management (ITSM) has a number of definitions from a variety of sources. Starting with the ITIL (the ITSM best practice framework)-espoused definition:

“The implementation and management of quality IT services that meet the needs of the business. IT service management is performed by IT service providers through an appropriate mix of people, process and information technology. See also service management.” Source: ITIL 2011 Glossary http://www.best-management-practice.com/officialsite.asp?DI=575004. Where service management is defined as: “A set of specialized organizational capabilities for providing value to customers in the form of services.”

A more “directly customer-focused” definition is provided on Wikipedia:

“A discipline for managing information technology (IT) systems, philosophically centered on the customer's perspective of IT's contribution to the business. ITSM stands in deliberate contrast to technology-centered approaches to IT management and business interaction.” Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IT_service_management

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Managing A Portfolio Of Innovations

CIOs consistently tell us that they want to exploit new technologies to drive innovation in the business. While many CIOs have groups chartered with R&D or new technology research, and most organizations have defined processes to “commercialize” those technology innovations that appear promising in their pilots, the middle period – between ideation and commercialization – is one with fewer management models and methods. During this time, there may be good ideas funded for prototyping, a number of projects funded for further study, and a number of prototypes waiting for the time to be ripe for commercialization.

So, how do we manage these mid-stage ideas and prototypes? Here are some ideas we’ve seen work that you might be able to use in your organization:

  • Track the prototypes. Just because an innovation process may be outside of the standard governance and management structure, it doesn’t mean we can’t share the same tools. Register your “innovation” projects in the same database as other projects. Link them all to a single “innovation” program to keep it easy to manage this group as a whole – and segregate them from your ongoing application or improvement initiatives and new project implementations.
  • Give someone overall responsibility for the innovation portfolio. If dispersed, initiatives can be “lost.” Centralized oversight of the portfolio will give it visibility.
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Now That We Have Tablets And Smartphones Here, How Do We Get Our Apps and Enterprise Data On Them?

According to Forrester surveys, 27% of companies support the iPad today, while another 31% plan to support it in the future. As organizations begin to support connected smart devices such as iPads and smartphones, they also want to connect them to their enterprise data and applications. Companies are turning to desktop virtualization (DV) as a solution to make that happen. DV is a consideration because:

  1. It facilitates employee access to enterprise data and applications from any platform-neutral device.
  2. Certain solutions allow you to convert your existing laptops/desktops into thin clients, enabling you to lengthen the life cycles of the equipment.
  3. Patch management and updates are controlled more effectively, potentially lowering internal management costs.
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Deloitte To Acquire Workday Implementation Specialist Aggressor

Deloitte continues to ramp up its software-as-a-service (SaaS) consulting practice, both through organic growth as well as acquisition. Today, Deloitte announced plans to acquire Workday implementation specialist Aggressor. Aggressor has been one of a very small set of Workday integrators (along with Deloitte), which means Deloitte now further boosts its already-impressive Workday practice.

This move furthers Deloitte’s Workday practice, as well as Deloitte’s overall practice in SaaS implementation and integration work. Deloitte also has strategic partnerships with other leading SaaS vendors, most notably salesforce.com.

For buyers, this means a stronger and deeper bench of consultants at Deloitte. But, on the downside, it removes a boutique/specialist option from the market, which appealed to some because of its laser focus, smaller size, and (perceived or real) ability to be more nimble, flexible, and price competitive.

Are you an Aggressor or Deloitte client or prospect? We would love to hear your thoughts!

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Global Optimization: Gaia Revisited

Analytics are the steering wheel that humanity uses to drive the world — or at least that portion of the planet over which we have some influence. Without the sensors, the correlators, the aggregators, the visualizers, the solvers, and the rest of what analytic applications depend on, we would be only a passenger, not a copilot, on this, our only home.

If you’ve spent any time around advanced mathematics and analytics, you’re bound to run into the phrase “global optimization.” All in all, this has little to do with optimizing the globe we live on; instead, it refers to techniques for solving a set of equations under various constraints. Nevertheless, I love the phrase’s evocative ring, in that it suggests the Gaia Hypothesis, a controversial conjecture that the Earth is a sort of super-organism. Specifically, it models the Earth as a closed, self-regulating, virtuous feedback loop of organic and inorganic processes that, considered holistically, maintains life-sustaining homeostasis. This hypothesis suggests that the planet as a whole is continuously optimizing the conditions for our ongoing existence — and that the biosphere may perish, just like any organism, if it falls into a vicious feedback loop of its own undoing.

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Don’t Forbid Employees From Using The Escalator, Give Them Reasons To Use The Stairs

Guest post from Researcher Nick Hayes.

If you had to go up one level in a train station, would you take the stairs or use the escalator? Most people would choose the escalator. But what if the staircase played musical notes like an interactive piano? This may change things, right? A couple of years ago, Volkswagen began sponsoring an initiative called The Fun Theory that tested the degree to which they could change people’s behavior for the better by introducing an element of fun. In one example, they found that by adding a unique element to the stairs – transforming it into an interactive piano – they were able to increase staircase use by 66%. You can watch the short video here.

You can apply this same principle to your training and awareness programs -- find your own piano staircase, and use it to begin guiding people to choose the right thing on their own. Chris and I have been working on a report that stresses the importance of organizational culture in the development of risk and compliance programs. Throughout the research process, we asked risk and compliance professionals and vendors in the space the same question: “How are you influencing and promoting positive behavior?”

You can create new technical controls and policies, and you can require employees to sign attestations all day, but these efforts have minimal value (or worse) when there’s no positive reinforcement. When compliance and risk management are considered obligatory tasks, rather than meaningful efforts that the company values, it diminishes the perceived importance of ethical behavior.

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Organizations Creating An Information Governance Program Are Often Entering Virgin Territory

Creating governance programs that separately address structured (data) or unstructured (content) can be a daunting task for any organization. Most organizations are just now addressing the governance issues that help ensure that their information, both data and content, is trustworthy and reliable. If creating separate governance programs is such a challenge, then why I am advocating the creation of a combined program for information governance? The challenges of governing structured data differ from the problems governing unstructured content, due to different goals, stakeholders, roles, and processes. The result is that governance of these areas involves completely separate endeavors.

But must they be wholly separate? Isn't there enough common ground? Creating an information governance framework that will address both their structured and unstructured information requires that the appropriate IT and business roles and responsibilities are clearly defined and that stakeholders from both IT and business are in agreement with the design and implementation efforts for an effective information governance strategy. Is this task too daunting for an organization to overcome? As more decisions are made using both data and content, it becomes increasingly important that all information used in the decision process is trustworthy and reliable. Agility in decision-making is dependent upon the right information at the right time. So my contention is that we should not wait for our data and content governance program to mature before implementing an overall information governance program. We should look at the similarities in the two governance programs to create a common framework that can be leveraged to create commonality and consistency in the information architecture.

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End Users: Should We Put Them In Padded Cells?

If you're an I&O professional, what comes to mind when you say "end user"? If you're like most of us, your mind has a conjured-up impression of a cosmically clueless person who actually gave you a hard time once, and the picture is now your mind's own avatar for everyone you support. It's not usually a positive image, is it? I used to picture a middle-aged, BMW-driving executive with his hair parted on one side wearing an LL Bean sweater, probably an Ivy-league grad, who couldn't be bothered to actually take responsibility for his own personal computing destiny…he always had servants to take care of trivialities…and hence he was ruining my day with his incompetence. Let's call him Ascot Rothschild III.

An image like that is a powerful thing, and the painful memory of this individual's willful, arrogant ignorance then pervades our future thinking about what we're up against when we set IT policy like BYOC. Ascot becomes the poster child - in our minds anyway - for every garden-variety corporate doofus that we'll have to deal with if we give people any more rope than we already do. They also give us plenty of reasons to take more rope away. In my case, I used to sit on a helpdesk for Remedy customers, and my team had a collection of "special" customers we wondered how they managed to get dressed and find their car keys in the morning. As I later designed Remedy and Peregrine applications, I did so with these "edge cases" in mind.

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Assessing Mobile Engagement Maturity: Is It A Useful Exercise?

As I mentioned in my last blog post, Ted Schadler and I are working on mobile strategy research for Forrester's CIO clients, and Ted's recent report Mobile Is The New Face of Engagement is the foundation for much of our research effort this year. One area that we are currently exploring for a new report is mobile engagement maturity, an assessment framework that will help our clients develop a strategy over time that leverages their strengths and addresses their weaknesses to continuously improve.

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