Dear Marketer: The Oval Office Called. It Wants Its Privacy Back.

 Yesterday, the White House released a long-awaited set of recommendations that are focused on helping individuals take greater control of how their data is collected and used for online marketing purposes. It includes what's being referred to as a "Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights."

The language is vague. The timeline to completion is long. The guidelines, for now, are "opt-in" for organizations. All true.

But folks? The glory days of scraping and selling and repurposing customer data are over. The Oval Office has spoken on the issue of privacy and personal data, and its bill of rights is crystal clear: Tell me what you’re collecting, how you’re using it, protect it well, give me a copy, and give me a chance to correct it, delete it, or opt out entirely.

Sound familiar? It should.  

We've written about personal identity management because we recognize that:

  1. Individuals want relevant offers and content, along with all the other great stuff that comes with sharing personal data.
  2. But, they are worried about privacy, security, and identity on the Web — and these concerns are only increasing.
  3. So, Do Not Track, the Privacy Bill of Rights, and similar guidelines will gain widespread approval and adoption . . .
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Data Privacy Heat Map highlights challenges of navigating global privacy legislations

Guest post from Researcher Chris Sherman.

Data privacy laws are the champions of citizens' rights in the digital age. However, multi-national  organizations often find these laws challenging to navigate given the complex framework of global legal requirements. To help our clients address these challenges, Forrester developed a research and planning tool called the Data Privacy Heat Map (try the demo version here). Leveraging in-depth analyses on the privacy legislation of 54 countries around the world, this product is aimed at helping our clients better strategize their own global privacy and data protection approaches.

Using the tool, one can quickly determine how various countries stack up against each another in terms of their data privacy standards. Each country has been rated across seven key criteria, covering the breadth of law, EU adequacy, data transfer limitations, government surveillance activities, etc. Leveraging this data, our clients will be able to establish their own data privacy “high watermarks”, ensuring compliance in all locales in which their organization operates. One such application is in the use of cloud computing. Since the cloud is borderless, jurisdictional-based privacy laws are often a mismatch when applied to clouds. When considering outsourcing to a cloud service, companies should consult Forrester’s Privacy Heat Map to determine, for example, whether their data will be at risk of residing in a country with questionable governance surveillance practices.

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Why Google's Privacy Changes (And The 'Data Tidy Up') Moves Everything Forward

Google has handled its privacy debate by being disarmingly clear with a little note left on the fridge the other week.

We’re tidying up and love data too much to not want to connect it better.

Like it or lump it.

Love Google.

It’s their right - they are after all a private company and not the public service we somehow feel them to be. Google wants to “create a beautifully simple, intuitive user experience” and its data consolidation is what will help it do this. Facebook makes one product called Facebook while Google up until now has chosen to run many nom de plumes, betas, and side initiatives. I’d like to see a more capable ‘joined up’ Google sparring with Apple and Facebook on who can do the coolest and most useful things for people using data. In truth, the Google engineering team must be relieved to ditch the sticking plasters and chewing gum connecting the hitherto disparate data sets they manage.

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